Harvard Professor, Author Keynote at Hugo L. Black Lecture

Laurence H. Tribe, the Carl M. Loeb University Professor at Harvard Law School, was the keynote speaker at the 18th Annual Hugo L. Black Lecture

Laurence H. Tribe, the Carl M. Loeb University Professor at Harvard Law School, was the keynote speaker at the 18th Annual Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression held Oct. 22 in Memorial Chapel.

Tribe's talk was titled "Life Unedited." Tribe clerked for the California and U.S. Supreme Courts (1966-68); was voted a tenured professorship at 29; helped write constitutions for South Africa, the Czech Republic, and the Marshall Islands; has prevailed in three-fifths of the many appellate cases, most of them pro bono, that he has argued (including 34 in the U.S. Supreme Court); and has written 115 books and articles, including <i>American Constitutional Law</i>, cited more often than any other legal text since 1950.

Tribe's talk was titled "Life Unedited." Tribe clerked for the California and U.S. Supreme Courts (1966-68); was voted a tenured professorship at 29; helped write constitutions for South Africa, the Czech Republic, and the Marshall Islands; has prevailed in three-fifths of the many appellate cases, most of them pro bono, that he has argued (including 34 in the U.S. Supreme Court); and has written 115 books and articles, including American Constitutional Law, cited more often than any other legal text since 1950.

 

The Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression, endowed by a gift from Leonard S. Halpert, Esq., Class of 1944, and named in honor of the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice, was inaugurated in 1991–92. (Photos by Intisar Abioto '09)

The Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression was attended by more than 160 guests. The annual lecture is endowed by a gift from Leonard S. Halpert, Esq., Class of 1944, and named in honor of the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice, was inaugurated in 1991–92. (Photos by Intisar Abioto '09)