Angle, Gallarotti, Gottschalk Promoted, Willis Appointed to Endowed Professorship

Wesleyan University has announced the promotion to full professor, effective July 1, 2009, of the following members of the faculty.

Stephen Angle

Stephen Angle

Stephen Angle, professor of philosophy, came to Wesleyan in 1994. He has served as director of the Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies, co-directed the NEH summer seminar “Traditions into Dialogue: Confucianism and Contemporary Virtue Ethics” at Wesleyan in 2008, was a Fulbright Research Scholar at Beijing University in 2006-2007, and was awarded Wesleyan’s Binswanger prize for excellence in teaching in 2006. His research focuses on neo-Confucian philosophy, and his books include Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy (forthcoming from Oxford University Press) and Human Rights and Chinese Thought: A Cross-Cultural Inquiry (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002).

He holds a B.A. in East Asian Studies from Yale University, and a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Michigan.

Giulio Gallarotti

Giulio Gallarotti

Giulio Gallarotti, professor of government, came to Wesleyan in 1987. His research and teaching focus on international relations, political economy, international organization, and diplomacy. He is author of numerous articles; his most recent book, The Power Curse: Real Influence and Illusion in International Relations, on “hard power,” is forthcoming from Lynne Rienner Press; and his book, The Power Balance, on “soft power” is in progress. He is also author of The Anatomy of an International Monetary Regime: The Classical Gold Standard 1880-1914 (Oxford University Press, 1995) as well as numerous articles and essays.

He earned his B.A., Phi Beta Kappa, from Hunter College; his M.I.A. and Ph.D. are from Columbia University.

Peter Gottschalk

Peter Gottschalk

Peter Gottschalk, professor of religion, has taught at Wesleyan since 2002. He was awarded the Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellowship grant in 2004, and the Mellon New Initiative grant for 2004-2006. His books include: Classifying Religion: British Scientism and the Discovery of Hindu and Muslim Indias (forthcoming from Oxford University Press), Islamophobia: Making Muslims the Enemy, co-authored with Gabriel Greenberg (Rowen & Littlefield, 2007), and Beyond Hindu and Muslim: Multiple Identity in Narratives from Village India (New York and Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2000 and 2001).

He earned his B.A. in history, cum laude with honors, from College of the Holy Cross, his M.A. in South Asian Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and his Ph.D. in history of religions from the University of Chicago.
Wesleyan also has announced an appointment to an endowed professorship.

Elizabeth Willis

Elizabeth Willis

Elizabeth Willis, associate professor of English, has been appointed Shapiro-Silverberg Associate Professor of Creative Writing. Her books of poetry include Meteoric Flowers (Wesleyan 2006), Turneresque (Burning Deck, 2003), and The Human Abstract (Penguin 1995). Her most recent collection was released this spring in French translation. Her work has received awards and fellowships from the National Poetry Series, the Walter Thayer Foundation, the Howard Foundation, and the California Council for the Arts, along with residencies at Brown University, the MacDowell Colony, and the Centre Internationale de Poesie in Marseille. Her work appears in numerous anthologies, most recently American Hybrid: A Norton Anthology (2009). Her critical writing on poetry and visual culture focuses on the intersections of public and private life, the effects of political and technological developments on aesthetic production, and the relation of poets to their sources. An edited volume of essays titled Radical Vernacular: Lorine Niedecker and the Poetics of Place was published last year by University of Iowa Press. Before coming to Wesleyan in 2002, she was Distinguished Writer in Residence in the MFA program at Mills College. This summer she is completing her fifth book of poems.

The Shapiro-Silverberg Chair in Creative Writing was endowed by John Shapiro ’74 and Shonni Silverberg ’76.