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Monthly Archive for December, 2009

The 35-minute film, Songs of a Sorrowful Man, explores the life of a painter, composer and singer living in West Bengal, India.

The 35-minute film, Songs of a Sorrowful Man, explores the life of a painter, composer and singer living in West Bengal, India.

The new film, Songs of a Sorrowful Man, directed by Ákos Östör, professor of anthropology, emeritus, and edited by film major Joe Sousa ’03, began its journey debuting at the biennial Royal Anthropological Film Festival, held at Leeds University in July.

The film was then shown at the the American Anthropological Association meeting in Philadelphia, Pa. Dec. 2-6. It also was screened recently at at Brown where it was featured as the lead event in Brown’s “Year of India” celebrations (2009-10).

The “sorrowful man,” Dukhushyam Chitrakar is a charismatic figure who encourages women to take up the traditional craft of scroll painting and musical composition pursued almost exclusively by men before.

In a series of edited sequences, the film chronicles Dukhushyam’s vision of the decline and rebirth of his art; his tolerant Sufi Muslim spirituality; his engagement with Hindus, Muslims and the modern world; his encyclopedic knowledge of changing musical and painting histories and techniques; the influence of his beliefs on his way of life, and his teachings for future generations of painters and singers in his community.

Read more about the film in an Oct. 27, 2009 Wesleyan Connection article.

Karen Collins, chair and professor of mathematics, served as a judge in the Siemens Competition in Math, Science and Technology that awarded $100,000 to high school students. In a Dec. 7 New York Times article, Collins said, ”We never expected high school students to achieve such success in examining this upper-bound aspect of graph theory.”

Gary Yohe, Woodhouse/Sysco Professor of Economics, and senior member of the United Nations’ International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), discusses in a Dec. 6 issue of  The Los Angeles Times the possibilities at the U.N.’s Climate Change Conference In Copenhagen, Denmark.

In the article, Yohe says that “many nations would like to see a definitive agreement come out of the Copenhagen conference. But in the absence of climate legislation passed by the U.S. Congress, it is unlikely we will see anything like a binding treaty. Still, significant progress is possible.

Copenhagen offers the prospect of agreement on a number of structural issues. First would be establishing ways to facilitate technology transfer while preserving intellectual property rights. Another possibility is agreement on ways of integrating nationally specific climate policies into future global programs. The conference could also put in place funding mechanisms for developed countries to aid developing countries in finding methods of mitigating and adapting to the consequences of climate change.

These more technical areas offer many opportunities through which the United States can begin to be seen as part of the solution.”

QAC Hosts Poster Session

I-Hui Chow '12 explains his research titled "Is adolescent smoking associated with lust and romantic commitment?" during the Quantitative Analysis Center's Poster Session Dec. 17 in Beckham Hall. More than 70 students presented posters at the event.  All students are enrolled in the course QAC 201, Applied Data Analysis.

I-Hui Chow '12 explains his research titled "Is adolescent smoking associated with lust and romantic commitment?" during the Quantitative Analysis Center's Poster Session Dec. 17 in Beckham Hall. More than 70 students presented posters at the event. All students are enrolled in the course QAC 201, Applied Data Analysis.

College of Social Studies major Chelsea Sprayregen '10 shared her poster titled "What is the relationship between education and attitudes toward homosexuality?"

College of Social Studies major Chelsea Sprayregen '10 shared her poster titled "What is the relationship between education and attitudes toward homosexuality?"

Biology graduate student Christian Skorik's project is titled "Parasitism in forest caterpillars: complex ecology in a tritrophic system." Skorik's advisor is Michael Singer, assistant professor of biology.

Biology graduate student Christian Skorik's project is titled "Parasitism in forest caterpillars: complex ecology in a tritrophic system." Skorik's advisor is Michael Singer, assistant professor of biology.

Manju Hingorani, associate professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, is the author of “S. cerevisiae Msh2-Msh6 DNA binding kinetics reveal a mechanism of targeting sites for DNA mismatch repair,” published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ” Early Edition,” December 2009.

Dana Royer, assistant professor of earth and environmental sciences, is the author of “Fossil soils constrain ancient climate sensitivity,” published in the same journal.

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