Artwork from Weimar Republic Era Exhibited at Davison Art Center

The exhibit, Changing Visions: Prints, Drawings, and Photographs During the Weimar Republic and After, opened in the Davison Art Gallery on Feb. 10.

The exhibit, Changing Visions: Prints, Drawings, and Photographs During the Weimar Republic and After, opened in the Davison Art Gallery on Feb. 10.

On Feb. 15, Curator Clare Rogan led a gallery talk. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

On Feb. 15, Curator Clare Rogan led a gallery talk. The exhibit is free and open to the public through March 9.

The exhibition "Changing Visions" is drawn from the Davison Art Center collection, and explores the creative ferment during the Weimar Republic, and the travels of artists who fled after 1933 and brought new artistic ideas to audiences in Europe and the Americas.

The exhibition is drawn from the Davison Art Center collection, and explores the creative ferment during the Weimar Republic, and the travels of artists who fled after 1933 and brought new artistic ideas to audiences in Europe and the Americas.

The Weimar Republic in Germany lasted only 14 years, from 1919 until the seizure of power by Adolf Hitler and the establishment of the Third Reich in 1933. Yet from 1919 to 1933, artists thrived in an atmosphere of radical change. Otto Dix and George Grosz created biting social satire. Käthe Kollwitz advocated for the poor. Josef Albers, Lyonel Feininger, and Wassily Kandinsky promoted new design principles at the Bauhaus School. August Sander and Ilse Bing expanded the possibilities for photography.

The Weimar Republic in Germany lasted only 14 years, from 1919 until the seizure of power by Adolf Hitler and the establishment of the Third Reich in 1933. Yet from 1919 to 1933, artists thrived in an atmosphere of radical change. Otto Dix and George Grosz created biting social satire. Käthe Kollwitz advocated for the poor. Josef Albers, Lyonel Feininger, and Wassily Kandinsky promoted new design principles at the Bauhaus School. August Sander and Ilse Bing expanded the possibilities for photography.

While Russian artist Wassily (Vasily) Kandinsky was teaching at the Bauhaus in 1922, he created a series of etchings, woodcuts and lithography as part of the “Small Worlds” series. Kandinsky moved to Germany in 1896 and left in 1914 when World War I began.

While Russian artist Wassily Kandinsky was teaching at the Bauhaus in 1922, he created a series of a series of drypoints, woodcuts, and lithographs as part of the Small Worlds series.

The DAC gallery is open noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. (Photos by Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19)

The DAC gallery is open noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. (Photos by Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19)