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Service with Smiles, and Maybe a Hug or Two


 
Lennie Sweeny, top, and Maureen Tosto, left, have worked for Wesleyan’s Campus Dining Services for more than 35 years combined. Sweeny works as a cook in Summerfields and Tosto is a cashier at the Davenport Campus Center.
 
Posted 11/16/05
Q: What is your job title?

Lennie Sweeny (LS): Second cook. I do the prep work for the first cooks. They’re the ones who are in charge of everything. You could call me the soup lady, because I make all the soups and chili.

Maureen Tosto (MT): I’m a cashier.

Q: How many years have you worked in food services?

LS: I’ve been working for Wesleyan for 20 years. Seventeen of those years I worked at the Campus Center as a cashier and in salad, deli and beverage stock. I’ve been here in Summerfields for the past three years.

MT: I came here in 1984, but I left because I was pregnant. I came back in 1989. I’m a cashier now in the Campus Center, but I’ve done everything here. I’ve been in beverage stock, and I worked at Summerfields briefly as a line server.

Q: What are your job duties?

LS: My job first and foremost is to make the soup, and then I help prep other foods. I make two soups a day. The most popular soup is my clam chowder. I cook it with bacon bits and put my heart into it. We’ll go through four pots of that, and only one pot of tomato soup. Students love the cream soups. Yesterday we had a cream soup and by 12 noon there was no more, period.

MT: I monitor the students’ meal points on their cards and let them know if they’re low. Some of them pay cash. At lunchtime it’s bang, bang, bang.

Q: What hours do you typically work?

LS: I work 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 6 to 11 a.m. Friday.

MT: I work 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. I love those hours.

Q: Is working in food service stressful?

LS: Not here in Summerfields. Absolutely not. We all get along and work together to get the job done. No one says, “That’s not my job.” Charlie Moorehead is our boss and we love him and he loves us.

MT: No, I thrive on this.

Q: What is the best part about working in dining services?

LS: I like the atmosphere of the job here. I like how we’re all so close.

MT: I love the students. I still get emails from some of them who wanted to stay in contact. I love that I have a birds-eye view of every thing that goes on in here. Always something interesting to look at.

Q: What is your interaction with the students?

LS: I am always in the kitchen. When I worked at the Campus Center, the students were the best part of the job. I’d give at least 500 hugs a day and tell them everything is going to be OK during their exams. These kids are away from home and not seeing their moms and they all can use a hug. Hugs are good for the soul.

MT: I’m constantly working with the students. I like to give them a question of the day, sort of like a David Letterman poll. Last week I was asking, “Did you get a flu shot?” We have some interesting conversations.

Q: How many students are served in the Campus Center a day?

MT: When Lennie worked here, we had about 900 go through the line a day. But now things are more spread out on campus so that number has dwindled.

Q: Do you eat meals prepared in Summerfields and Campus Center?

LS: Usually I don’t have time. I rather make it than eat it. But I am here to make the best food I can possibly make. If I won’t eat it, then you’re not going to eat it.

MT: Sometimes I’ll go upstairs to Stephanie’s and have organic food. I love beets. I also drink a lot of Starbucks Doubleshots. Have you ever had one? I usually have four of them a day.

Q: What are your favorite foods?

MT: I like seafood. I love shrimp.

LS: Of all the soups I make, my personal favorite is the chicken stew. Breakfast is my favorite meal to make.

Q: Do you cook at home?

MT: I love to cook. I cook like I’m Italian even though I’m Irish. Every Sunday I make two or three big dinners like roast beef or sausage and peppers and they last us throughout the week.

LS: I don’t. I spend enough time doing that here.

Q: Do you have families?

LS: I have two boys, Arnie, who is 24, and Randall, who is 22. Randall works at McConaughy Dining Hall. Everyone calls him “Oogie.” I also have a granddaughter named Amara. She’s 3, and we spend lots of time playing with Elmo and going to Chuck E. Cheese and the park. We all live here in Middletown.

MT: I have three girls. Melissa is 27 and she is a second grade teacher in Middletown. I’m going to repay her student loans the rest of my life. My daughter Katie turned 21 last week and she had a big party with 300 guests, but I pulled through. Amy is my youngest. She is 19. We also live in Middletown.

Q: How far back do you two go?

MT: We go way back, some 20-something years. Her boys used to come over and play Atari, and that’s just when it came out.

Q: Tell me about your hobbies and interests outside of work.

LS: I like to support people. If I wake up and I am alive, I think, ‘I was given a chance to do something today’ and how dare we complain about anything. I like to give hugs and help others. I’m always willing to help people who are struggling. That is my hobby.

MT: I stay home on Friday nights and wait for my girls to come home safely.
 

By Olivia Drake, The Wesleyan Connection editor

Recasting Human Resources, Payroll will Improve Service and Access


Dan Michaud has been appointed as the interim associate vice president for Human Resources to manage a new department including Payroll, Benefits and Human Resources.
Posted 11/16/05
A recent reorganization of services has combined the Human Resources Department with the Payroll and Benefits Offices. The reorganization became effective on Wednesday, Nov. 9 and was announced by John C. Meerts, interim vice president for finance and treasurer and vice president for Information Technology Services. The intent is to create a single, one-stop office that handles compensation, benefits, personnel information, transactions and recruitment.

“By merging the two areas we’ve created a more efficient, more accessible service for faculty and staff,” says Meerts. “Bringing these areas together in a single department will provide better overall service in these areas and eliminate confusion about who to contact for any of these issues.”

Meerts adds that the offices will eventually be combined physically at a single location to provide additional convenience for faculty and staff.

Dan Michaud has been appointed as the interim associate vice president for human resources to manage the new expanded department. Michaud comes to Wesleyan from Caritas Christi Health Care in Boston, Mass.

“We’re very excited about Dan coming to Wesleyan,” Meerts says. “He has tremendous experience in managing these services in a nonprofit environment and we’ll be looking forward to his expertise and leadership, especially during this transitional period.”

Meerts and Michaud hope to finalize a new location for the department in the near future.

 
By David Pesci, director of Media Relations

Wesleyan Science Program Energizes Local Elementary School Class


At top, fifth grader Taylor Spencer learns about the hydrogen make-up of vinegar, club soda and ammonia with Manju Hingorani, assistant professor of molecular biology and biochemistry at Spencer Elementary School Nov. 10. (Photo by Olivia Drake)
Posted 11/16/05
When 18 fifth graders from the Spencer School in Middletown came home on Nov. 10 and were asked, ‘What did you do in school today?’ they had a few ready answers:

“We extracted DNA from wheat germ, checked hydrogen levels in household products and stripped-away pigments from M&M candies.”

Probably a little different from the responses parents had heard the day before.

The extracting, checking and stripping-away came courtesy of an all-female Wesleyan faculty and student organization called Action Science Kids (ASK), which is part of the Wesleyan Women in Science program (WesWIS). One of ASK’s goals is to generate interest in science among the elementary school-aged students, as well as to demonstrate to girls and boys that the sciences are not only accessible to men.

“The idea is to infuse a notion of intelligent, competent women in various scientific fields,” said Kate Longley, a ASK member and Wesleyan senior biology major from Delmar, N.Y.

The Nov. 10 demonstration in Mrs. Greenlaw’s homeroom class was ASK’s most recent effort. Students and volunteers were divided up into groups and participated in the three different science experiments.

Manju Hingorani, assistant professor of Molecular Biology & Biochemistry, led an experiment where she explained how common household products like vinegar, aspirin and ammonia, among others, contain different levels of hydrogen. When mixed with red cabbage juice, students determined that the pink mixtures, like vinegar, contained more hydrogen than the green mixtures like ammonia.

“Learning how to engage such a young audience in scientific discussions is quite an experience,” says Hingorani.

She adds that she enjoys the presentations and is hoping more Wesleyan students will get involved with the ASK program.

“It is very effective to show kids that, at any age, how much fun they and grown-ups can have with scientific experiments,” she explained.

Emily Alexy, a Wesleyan senior and math major from Ohio, worked on the experiment extracting DNA from wheat germ.

“Does anyone know what DNA does?” she asked. “It’s like a recipe for something and tells your body what you’re going to look like.”

Alexy discussed DNA and its functions, using common items, like soap, rubbing alcohol and water. In her experiment, DNA strands bubbled up to the top of the student’s test tubes when they mixed soap with wheat germ, warm water, meat tenderizer and baking soda.

One of the students, a 10-year-old named Eleanor, grew excited when her DNA strand fizzed to the top of her test tube.

“I like science because you get to learn about your world and earth you live in!” she exclaimed.

Samsun Nahar, a freshman from Manchester, Conn. presented an experiment called candy chromatography. She led students through rubbing coffee-filter paper across the candy coating of brown M&Ms, brown Reese’s Pieces candies and purple jellybeans to observe their different color coatings and dyes.

For more information about ASK contact Manju Hingorani at 860-685-2284 or mhingorani@wesleyan.edu.

 
By Laura Perillo, associate director of Media Relations

Physics Department Welcomes New Assistant Professor


Tsampikos Kottos, assistant professor of physics, teaches classical dynamics this fall.
 
Posted 11/16/05
Tsampikos Kottos’ research field is so narrow he often has to measure it in nanometers.

Kottos, who joined the Physics Department as an assistant professor in August, is an expert in mesoscopic physics, non-linear dynamics and theory of quantum chaos. Mesoscopic systems, such as semiconductors, metal wires, small metal grains or semiconductor quantum dots, can range in size from 1/1000 of a millimeter to one nanometer.

Kottos, who came to Wesleyan from Germany, has a bachelor’s of arts in physics, a master’s of arts in solid-state physics and a Ph.D from the University of Crete, Greece. His thesis was “Electron Dynamics and diffusion properties in 1D and quasi-1D random lattices.”

Recent studies on classical chaotic dynamics in quantum observables have a range of applicability covering areas from mesoscopic, atomic and molecular physics to acoustics and microwaves.

He has published more than 40 papers on mesoscopics, mathematical physics and computational modeling of complex systems. Topics include random matrix theory, semi-classics, and quantum graphs; theory of driven chaotic mesoscopic systems; computational foundations for modeling quantum transport in complex structures; and control of chaos through impurities. In April, he served as guest editor in a special issue of “Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and General” on the topic “Trends of Quantum Chaotic Scattering.”

Kottos has presented his research at more than 35 universities and international conferences.

Kottos received a United States European Office of Air Force Research and Development Fellowship in 1997, and was a Feinberg Fellow between 1997-99. Since 2000, Kottos has devoted his research time to developing a theory of driven chaotic mesoscopic systems and instability of quantum dynamics. As a result, he received a grant in 2002 from the German-Israeli Foundation for Scientific Research and Development.

Recently, Kottos received funding from the Max-Planck-Institut für Physik komplexer Systeme-Dresden to organize an international conference on “Aspects of Quantum Chaotic Scattering.”

This fall he is teaching a course on classical dynamics.

Kottos says teaching and research activities co-exist in a positive way at Wesleyan. He also admires the strong colleagueship at the university.

“For every problem that I had, there was at least one person to help me find a solution, and this is not only for work-related problems,” he explains. “Coming from Europe to the United States is a big step. People in the department and within Wesleyan have helped myself and my family to make the transition very smooth.”

Kottos lives in Middletown with his wife Mania and his two daughters, Rafaela and Eva-Maria.
 

By Olivia Drake, The Wesleyan Connection editor

Economics Professor Concerned with the Climate


Posted 11/02/05
Gary Yohe, the John E. Andrus Professor of Economics, wasn’t surprised to learn that Hurricanes Katrina and Wilma were churning in the Gulf of Mexico. But along with scientists across the globe, the economist was surprised by how quickly the storms intensified into catastrophic proportions.

The unpredictability of what these storms and global warming’s possible effect on their intensity and increased frequency is what Yohe, a climate change economist, has been studying along with scientists for nearly 25 years.

Climatologists, biologists, and climate modelers often collaborate with Yohe as they contemplate what could happen in certain scenarios.

“They take what economists like me give them and they produce climate scenarios and impact trajectories,” says Yohe. “Economists then take their products as ‘inputs’ for vulnerability assessments.”

Last fall, Yohe co-authored a paper in the journal Science outlining a possible deterrent to global warming. The paper suggested attaching a tax on the carbon content (which generates the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide) in fossil fuels of $10 per ton (or about 5 cents per gallon of gasoline) and gradually increasing it each year.

Yohe compares this possible tax increase to buying insurance against global warming. In economic terms it’s known as “hedging” – doing something that reduces the likelihood of an unpleasant outcome.

He says that hedging global warming is like diversifying governments’ policy portfolios just like individuals diversify their financial portfolios.

“In no case is buying insurance like paying premiums into a pot from which you collect payment to cover a climate induced loss,” he says. “Instead, investments in hedging strategies are designed to reduce the anticipated cost of climate impacts. We need to accept that the climate is changing, perhaps increasing the intensity of hurricanes, for example, and make complementary investments in our capacity to adapt.”

Yohe will be sharing his research on how scientists may adapt to the ever-changing climate when he presents his findings in January to the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change (IPCC) – the international gathering of natural and social scientists who routinely assess climate change. He and his fellow study authors hope to ultimately provide environmental policy-makers some insight into how they may intelligently voice their concerns about climate change.

Yohe also hopes that his upcoming journal article in Climatic Change will help magnify the importance of integrating climate into development plans. He is currently collecting contributions from scientists who participated in the Aspen Global Change Institute workshop of Abrupt Climate Change last summer for the article.

However, Yohe admits that it could be a while until we see any real action by policy-makers regarding global warming as the United States has withdrawn from discussions under the Kyoto Protocol. (An international agreement between more than 150 countries to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions that are suspected to be the cause of global warming). Still, Northeastern states have been joined by California and some Canadian provinces in an effort to reduce emissions in spite of Washington’s reluctance to proceed.

“Citizens of these states can work to support and to expand these efforts to manage climate risks in anticipation that, over the coming years, the threat of climate impacts, particularly abrupt impact of the sort observed in the Arctic over the past few years, becomes so clear that the federal government will follow their lead,” explains Yohe.

 
By  Laura Perillo, associate director of Media Relations

Retired Faculty Center Opens


The Susan B. and William K. Wasch Center for Retired Faculty opened Nov. 5 during an Open House.
Posted 11/02/05. Updated 11.06.05
The Susan B. and William K. Wasch Center for Retired Faculty at 51 Lawn Avenue held its Open House Nov. 5 during Homecoming/Family Weekend.

The Center is named for Susie and Bill Wasch ’52, P’84, who contributed their vision and support for the project.

This new center creates a shared intellectual and social community where retired faculty members can continue their scholarly activities and participation in university life.

Trustee Emeritus Bob McKelvey ’59 believes the Wasch Center for Retired Faculty will provide invaluable connections between different generations of Wesleyan faculty. In supporting this project, he honored former “first lady” Katharina “Kay” Butterfield with the naming of the “Butterfield Room”.

Professor Explores Stardom at Benefit Dinner


Posted 11/02/05. Updated 11.07.05
Several Hollywood female stars were introduced to Middlesex County women and girls during a benefit dinner Nov. 6, titled “Stardom Then and Now.”

The presentation, by Corwin-Fuller Professor of Film studies and chair of the Film Studies Department Jeanine Basinger, provided an insider’s look at the star system in Hollywood and how it has evolved through the years.

Basinger, who is also the curator of Wesleyan’s Cinema Archives, offered an exploration of the power and limitations female stars dealt with in the early Hollywood years and the influences that changed the nature of stardom into its present incarnation. She discussed the long road to creative independence in the 21st century that now sees successful female stars frequently running their own production companies, selecting their own directors and often having script approval.

“Stardom in the 30s, 40s and 50s projected glamour, fashion and sex to the public,” Basinger says. “Yet at the same time, the system often dictated the stars’ personal as well as professional lives.”

“Stardom Then & Now” benefited The Fund for Women & Girls, an endowed fund of the Middlesex County Community Foundation created by women to teach Middlesex County women and girls to be self-reliant and reach their potential.

The event was held at the Film Studies Center. For more information contact the Middlesex County Community Foundation at (860) 347-0025 or email info@MiddlesexCountyCF.org.

Working with Deans, Course Assistants and Teaching Apprentices


Lucy Diaz, administrative assistant to the academic deans, is co-chair to the Administrators and Faculty of Color Alliance (AFCA).
 
Posted 11/02/05
Q: When were you hired as the administrative assistant to the academic deans?

A: I started at Wesleyan in October 2001.

Q: What are some of your duties?

A: The majority of my day is spent on the phone responding to inquiries from faculty and staff, reconciling accounts, gathering financial data, and maintaining various files and databases.

Q: What goes on during a day in the Office of Academic Affairs?

A: My job is a little different each day and I really enjoy the variations. Some days I spend most of my time maintaining the deans’ calendars and discretionary accounts, or working with proposals for internal sources of funding such as pedagogical, fund for innovation and seed grants. I also spend a great deal of time providing administrative support to the Educational Policy Committee and managing the Course Assistant and Teaching Apprentice programs.

Q: What are the Course Assistant and Teaching Apprentice programs?

A: A Course Assistant helps a faculty member by preparing course materials, managing logistics of a course and working with technology. They can receive a $400 stipend for completing the work. Students in the Teaching Apprentice Program work closely with a faculty mentor to understand the pedagogical issues related to a particular course and discipline and to deepen the student’s understanding of the subject matter. They receive course credit.

Q: Do you interact much with the students?

A: Unfortunately, my job doesn’t provide me the opportunity to interact with students on a regular basis. When I do engage with students, it is through AFCA or as a result of my role in Wesleyan’s Course Assistant and Teaching Apprentice programs. I ensure the students who are involved in these programs are properly registered for the tutorials, receive course credit and issue their payroll.

Q: What are some of the challenges of your job?

A: One of the most recent was working with Jen Curran in Information Technology Services in developing an electronic application and registration process for Course Assistants and Teaching Apprentices. It was a lot of work to orchestrate but it has really paid off because what was once a process of shuffling 400 pieces of paper per semester is now wonderfully organized within electronic portfolio.

Q: Who are the key people you work with in the Academic Deans section of the Office of Academic Affairs?

A: I work closely with the deans of the three academic divisions, LiLy Milroy, Don Moon and Joe Bruno, as well as with Billy Weitzer, senior associate provost, and Joy Vodak, coordinator for the Dean of the College Office.

Q: Tell me about your role as co-chair to the Administrators and Faculty of Color Alliance (AFCA).

A
: I work closely with my co-chair and friend Andy McGadney of University Relations in planning and implementing current and future AFCA programming. I also work closely with members of the AFCA executive committee; Marina Melendez, Frank Kuan, Migdalia Pinkney, Lori Hunter, Ricardo Morris and Dianna Dozier. Being a part of AFCA has provided me the opportunity to give back to the Wesleyan community. It has also afforded me the opportunity to meet and interact with members of the Wesleyan community whom I ordinarily wouldn’t have met as part of my job in Academic Affairs.

Q: What is the purpose or goal of AFCA?

A: AFCA is a volunteer organization which seeks to strengthen and enhance the relationship between the Wesleyan community, its employees and students of color. Right now AFCA is going through a truly exciting period because we are currently working on creating a strategic plan which will help us to identify the organization’s key goals and objectives and to clearly articulate our mission, values and responsibilities. We really want the AFCA membership as well as the larger Wesleyan community to have a better understanding of our goals and priorities.

Q: Where did you receive your education and in what?

A: I received a bachelor’s in psychology from Quinnipiac University in 1998 and I recently completed my master’s of arts in liberal studies from Wesleyan in May 2005.

Q: What are your hobbies?

A: I am avid reader and I really love planning and hosting parties.

Q: Where do you live, and do you have children?

A: I live in Meriden with my 5-year-old son, Josiah. We spend a lot of time playing with our energetic dog, Sunny, and working on our soccer skills.

Q: What would you say is the most unique thing about you?

A: I guess one could say I have a passion for fashion.

Q: What’s your favorite thing about working here?

A: I love working at Wesleyan. I think it is great to work in an environment where learning is fundamental and ongoing, even among faculty and staff.
 

By Olivia Drake, The Wesleyan Connection editor

Class Dean Guides Students to Make Good Decisions


Lisa Gates, dean of the class of 2007, holds a photograph of her class inside her office in North College. Gates monitors the academic performance of 760 students.
 
Posted 11/02/05
Steering students toward success is Lisa Gates’ top priority. As dean of the class of 2007, she’s constantly helping students meet or exceed their academic goals on the way to graduation.

Gates meets with many of her 760 students during the academic year. As a class dean, she is responsible for monitoring the academic performance of her class and ensuring students are making appropriate progress toward earning their degrees. But she also helps students resolve academic or personal problems, including working with faculty and staff in many other departments to assist students.

“Sometimes they just need my signature for a form,” she says. “But sometimes they’re having difficulty in a particular class or there’s an urgent personal situation and a midterm looming the next day. You never know what you’re going to get.”

Gates says that one of the principal challenges in being a dean is helping students learn to make good decisions and take responsibility for their actions.

“We expect students to be capable, reasonably organized, and responsible,” she says. “But we forget that these are adult abilities have to be learned and developed with time and experience. It’s my job to both support them through a difficult situation but also push them to take something constructive away from the experience. You can be an extremely bright person, but if you aren’t getting to class and managing your time effectively for whatever reason, you’re going to run into trouble.”

She also serves as a general resource for students, discussing different academic directions, internships, leaves of absence and study abroad opportunities. For many students, making a connection to a particular faculty member or a specific program on campus can shape their undergraduate experience in a fundamental way, Gates says.

“That’s one of the most satisfying aspects of this position, when a student comes to me with a vague interest and I can give a few names of people that they might want to talk with,” she says. “It’s nice to have a role in that process.”

In 2004, the Dean of the College Office’s model for class management was revised. Deans who normally worked with just one class now follow the same group of students throughout their academic career.

“What’s good about this new model is that, students can easily remember who their dean is, and they can get to know us better,” Gates says. “By working with a student multiple years, we’ll be able to support them better.”

Gates usually splits her time between meeting with students and following up with student issues. Nishita Roy ’07, met with Dean Gates this semester to discuss a pressing problem.

“My first impression of Dean Gates was that she is extremely personable, but also very serious about her work,” Roy says. “She listened attentively to my problem and took notes when I was talking, which proved that she was intent on ensuring that she had all of the facts straight. I felt extremely comfortable talking with Dean Gates and confident in her desire to assist me to the best of her abilities.”

Roy says her interaction with Dean Gates reaffirms her opinion that the class deans are generally a valuable resource for students.

“They’re committed to improving students’ lives at Wesleyan,” she says.

Gates usually splits her time between meeting with students and following up with student issues. She holds daily open-office hours. Gates also serves on the International Student Coordinating Committee, coordinates the Beinecke Scholarship Committee and the Janina Montero prize, and participates in various other committees and Dean of the College Office initiatives.

Gates moved to Connecticut in 1996 with her husband, Michael Roy, director of academic computing in Information Technology Services. In 2001, she joined the Dean of the College Office as an associate dean and director of New Student Programs. In this position, she worked on redesigning the orientation program for new students and other student programs to help students transition into the university. In 2004, she became a class dean.

Gates holds a bachelor’s degree in German language and women studies from Dartmouth College and a Ph.D in Germanic languages and literatures from Harvard University. She studied abroad in Berlin, Germany and received a Fulbright scholarship to study at the University of Hamburg. Her dissertation focused on the representation of blackness in late-19th and 20th-century German culture, looking specifically at the way in which “racial otherness” served as a vehicle for exploring how Germans understood their own cultural identity.

“I’ve always been interested in the German culture. It is rich with literary history, and this was an interesting way of connecting my professional experiences on issues of race in American culture with my graduate work in German,” Gates says.

Prior to Wesleyan, she worked at Duke University as a project manager for the Black Periodical Literature Project, a collection of fiction, literary materials and poems produced by the African-American press between 1827 and 1940. She also taught German language and literature courses at Harvard and the University of Connecticut.

“Teaching is something I’d like to do again,” she says. “I would enjoy interacting with students in another setting. It’s a part of my former life that I miss.”

Gates and Roy live in Higganum with their three children, Ethan, 12; Anna, 9, and Julian, 3. In her spare time, she enjoys gardening herbs and flowers, cooking and writing. Her work is often published in Preview Connecticut’s art section.
 

By Olivia Drake, The Wesleyan Connection editor

Government Department Welcomes New Assistant Professor


Posted 11/02/05
Kelly Greenhill joined the Government Department as an assistant professor in July.

Greenhill’s current research focuses on non-traditional coercion, counterinsurgency operations and barriers to conflict resolution. Such research has appeared in a variety of books and journals, including Security Studies, International Migration, and Polity.

This semester, Greenhill is teaching a course on civil wars and international conflict management and another on geography and international conflict. In the spring, she will teach an introductory international relations course, as well as another that offers a more in-depth exploration of international relations theory.

“I was attracted to Wesleyan for myriad reasons, but was especially drawn by the high caliber of the student body and by the university’s clear commitment to cultivating amongst its faculty both strong teachers and scholars,” she says. “I very much look forward to becoming an integrated and engaged member of the Wesleyan community.”

Greenhill holds a bachelor’s of arts degree (double major) in political economy and Scandinavian studies from the University of California at Berkeley; a certificate of special studies in international management from Harvard University; and a master’s of science and doctorate in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

In addition to her appointment at Wesleyan, Greenhill is a research fellow in the International Security and Intrastate Conflict Programs at Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.

Her studies have been supported in part by the Social Science Research Council, the MacArthur Foundation, the Mellon Foundation and the Eisenhower Foundation.

Before coming to BCSIA, Greenhill held pre-doctoral fellowships at Harvard’s Olin Institute for Strategic Studies and Stanford’s Center for International Security and Cooperation. She served as a consultant to the Ford Foundation and to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees as a defense program analyst for the U.S. Department of Defense, and as an economic policy intern in the Office of Senator John F. Kerry.

Greenhill’s other interests include rock climbing, hiking, skiing and kayaking. She also enjoys cooking, watching films and “reading practically anything I can get my hands on.”
 

By Olivia Drake, The Wesleyan Connection editor

The Puck Stops Here


Donna Wright, women’s ice hockey head coach, learned to play hockey on a pond.
 
Posted 11/02/05
Q: How many years have you been the women’s ice hockey head coach?

A: I began my coaching career at Wesleyan in September 1995. I was hired as the head women’s hockey coach and assistant lacrosse coach. Because the position was not an adjunct faculty position at that time, I also took a part-time position in the Physical Plant as a network desktop support person. It enabled me to be at Wesleyan full-time.

Q: When does the season begin and end?

A: Our season officially begins each year on November 1. Our regular season games end in late February and then the playoff season begins. The New England Small College Athletic Conference playoffs are usually the last weekend of February and the National Collegiate Athletic Association Championships are the third weekend of March. The goal is to play into March!

Q: How difficult is it to find talented women’s ice hockey players among all the secondary schools?

A: Recruiting is a challenging task. Women’s ice hockey is a very regional sport with the majority of players coming from New England and Minnesota. More and more opportunities have been created in other Midwest states like Wisconsin and Illinois, as well as New York, New Jersey and Maryland. There are very few public high school varsity teams. Most of these are in Minnesota, Massachusetts and Connecticut, so many of the players still come from youth hockey programs and New England prep schools.

Q: How early are some of your players getting into their sport? Were they involved in other sports prior to hockey?

A: Many of my student-athletes currently play or have played other sports. Three of my current athletes are varsity field hockey players, one is a varsity soccer player and one is a rower. On average, the current student-athletes have been playing hockey more than 10 years.

Q: What are some of the skills and lessons that you stress year after year?

A: We will win as a team and lose as a team. I stress fundamentals, discipline and support. We will always work to continue to develop our individual skills, have the discipline to play as a team and always support each other on and off the ice.

Q: At what age did you take up the sport and why? What were some of the challenges of picking up what is thought of as a male-dominated sport?

A: I began hockey later than most of my players. I started when I was 14 years old. It began as an obsession on the pond with my male friends. Those were the days of playing on the pond from early morning until dark on Saturdays. I quickly developed a passion for the game and begged my parents to let me play. I grew up in Danbury, Conn. and the closest girls program was in West Haven, Conn. My parents were wonderfully supportive and not only allowed me to play but drove me several days a week to West Haven for practices and games. In the 80’s, there were limited opportunities for women to play in their own league. I always attended summer camps mainly for boys and played pickup games with boys. The biggest challenge was to get the boys to treat you as they treated the other boys.

Q: There’s a perception that it takes a certain emotional edge to play ice hockey. Is the perception true?

A: Hockey is a fast paced game that is best played with decisive players. The best players play with passion and determination. Sometimes relentless determination can decide a game or season. The Wesleyan 1997-98 team was such a team. With only 12 players that season, they ended their season by playing for the ECAC Alliance title against Middlebury. They finished with the best record in Wesleyan Women’s Hockey history of 17-8-1.

Q: Could you tell me a bit about your new assistant coach?

A: We are happy to have Heather Hoffay join our program. Heather has a lot of NESCAC playing and coaching experience. She is a 2003 Hamilton College graduate and spent the last two seasons assisting in the Trinity College women’s hockey program. She is passionate about the game and about coaching. She is a great addition!

Q: Briefly, where have you played and coached?

A: I was fortunate to play at Providence College. I learned a lot about the game during my time there. Soon after graduation, I began coaching youth hockey in South Windsor, Conn. It was an outlet for me to cultivate my love of hockey while working full-time at Pratt and Whitney as a systems analyst. Before long, I realized that coaching was my real passion and aggressively began coaching with the goal of coaching full time some day. Before coming to Wesleyan, I was an assistant for Manchester, Conn. boys’ varsity hockey, Brown University’s women’s hockey and Yale University’s women’s hockey.

Q: How would you compare the nature of women’s ice hockey at Wesleyan with your experience as a player at Providence and a coach in the Ivy League?

A: Women’s collegiate hockey has growth exponentially since my playing days and my Ivy coaching days. Since that time, Division III opportunities have been officially sanctioned and more than 50 collegiate teams, both Div I and Div III, have emerged. I find the student athletes here at Wesleyan are as committed and work just as hard as the Div I student athletes. We have a slightly shorter official season playing in the NESCAC conference, but these athletes train year round.

Q: How difficult is it to compete in the NESCAC with such national powers as Middlebury and Bowdoin to contend with every year?

A: It is a challenge to play in the NESCAC, but it is also great hockey! Our athletes are competitive and want to challenge themselves and the play best that Division III can offer. For most women, collegiate hockey is the most competitive hockey they will play in their careers.

Q: Do you root for any National Hockey League teams?

A: Coaching is not a career but a lifestyle. I watch a lot of hockey on all levels. Unfortunately, I don’t have much time to catch NHL games with my responsibilities here and raising a family. However, I am still a die-hard Ranger fan!

Q: Do you use tapes as a tool for the women?

A: We tape all home games and have tapes of all NESCAC away games. We do use the footage as a teaching tool for both players and coaches.

Q: I’ve heard rumors your husband, Bill, attends a lot of games with your boys, Nicholas and Kyle. Does he enjoy the sport as much as you, and what about the boys?

A: I am blessed with a great husband! Bill and the boys do come to all home games and some on the road. They are our biggest fans. Bill was not a hockey aficionado before we dated but has come to love the sport. He doesn’t even mind getting up at 5:30 a.m. to get Nicholas to the rink for practice on Saturday mornings. As for Nicholas and Kyle, they love coming to Wesleyan. They enjoy watching the team play as well as get on the ice themselves. Game day is just part of the Wright family life.

Q: When you’re not in the rink, what are you doing? What are your hobbies?

A: Bill and I spend a lot of time working on our home in Colchester. It is our hobby I guess. We have done everything from remodeling to landscaping. Besides that, we love to be outdoors as a family. As the boys are getting older, it is fun to ride bikes and play lots of sports.
 

By Olivia Drake, The Wesleyan Connection editor

The Wesleyan Connection: Campus Snapshot

A NEW OCTAVE: Bruce Harkness of the Verdin Bell Co. prepares to install a new bell into the South College belfry Oct. 3. Eight new bronze bells were hoisted to the top by a crane, adding a full octave to the instrument.

Harkness and Bill Burkhart, university photographer, discuss cable rack hardware for the new bells. Metal “tracker squares” connect the bells in the tower via the cable to the clavier — or keyboard — on a floor beneath the belfry.
Bell installer Don Swem performs the balancing act inside and outside the belfry dome.
Wesleyan Connection editor Olivia Bartlett and Lisa Dudley ’08 received a bellfry tour by the Verdin Bell Co. staff. To get into the cramped bell tower, they climbed scaffolding-steps, two ladders, crossed a wood plank and “limboed” under the bells’ frame.
Verdin Bell Co. installer Tina Harkness uses a ladder to climb through four tiers of bells. The original bells hang from the lower two levels, and the new bells hang from the top two levels.
Tina Harkness, Peter Frenzel professor emeritus of German Studies and Wesleyan chimemaster, Swem and Bruce Harkness gather around the clavier after installing the cables that lead to the bells above Oct. 10. Frenzel was the first to test-out the new bells. (Photos by Bill Burkhart, Olivia Bartlett and Don Swem)