Arts & Culture

Big Draw Unleashes the Artists Within

On April 25, the Friends of the Davison Art Center presented The Big Draw: Middletown, a community celebration of drawing and workshops for all skill levels, from beginning drawers to accomplished artists, at locations across Wesleyan. Facilitated by Wesleyan art professors and students, and sponsored by the Middletown Commission on the Arts and nine local businesses, the fourth annual free event attracted more than 300 participants from almost 40 towns. (Photos by Mariah Reisner ’04 MA ’07 and Tessa Houstoun ’17)

The Big Draw

Face painting was one of many activities offered at The Big Draw.

Longley ’82 Speaks at Friends of Wesleyan Library Event

Adobe Photoshop PDFOn April 21, Dione Longley ’82 spoke about her new book, Heroes for All Time: Connecticut Civil War Soldiers Tell Their Stories, co-authored by Buck Zaidel (Wesleyan University Press), in the Davison Rare Book Room at Olin Memorial Library as part of the 2015 Friends of the Wesleyan Library Annual Meeting Talk. The book uses soldiers’ letters and diaries, and written accounts by nurses, doctors, soldiers’ families, and volunteers on the home front to vividly portray the war. Hundreds of period photographs (most, previously unpublished) add to the narrative.

Longley was director of the Middlesex County Historical Society in Middletown for 20 years.  Now a public historian and writer, she lives in Higganum.

Dione Longley '82 spoke about "Heroes for All Time: Connecticut Civil War Soldiers Tell Their Stories," co-authored by Buck Zaidel,  on April 21 (Photo by Dat Vu '15.)

Dione Longley ’82 spoke about “Heroes for All Time: Connecticut Civil War Soldiers Tell Their Stories,” co-authored by Buck Zaidel, on April 21. (Photo by Dat Vu ’15.)

 

Winston Speaks at Retrospective for Günter Grass

Krishna Winston with Breon Mitchell, another translator of Günter Grass, at a retrospective for the writer at CUNY Graduate Center on April 28. (Photo by Iris Bork-Goldfield).

Krishna Winston with Breon Mitchell, another translator of Günter Grass, at a retrospective for the writer at CUNY Graduate Center on April 28. (Photo by Iris Bork-Goldfield).

On April 28, Krishna Winston, the Marcus L. Taft Professor of German Language and Literature, spoke on a panel at the CUNY Graduate Center on Nobel Prize–winner Günter Grass, one of Germany’s best-known contemporary writers, who died earlier this month.

Winston, Grass’s translator, is also professor of German Studies, professor of environmental studies, and coordinator of the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship. She spoke alongside Professor Friedrich Ulfers of New York University and Breon Mitchell, professor emeritus at Indiana University, Bloomington. The event, which was standing-room only, was moderated by Ralph Bunche Institute Director John Torpey, a professor at the CUNY Graduate Center.

 

McIntyre ’17 Brings “Before I Die” Public Art Project to Wes

Laura McIntyre '17 brought the "Before I Die" public art project to Wesleyan the week of April 20. Members of the Wesleyan community were asked to fill in their fears, ambitions and thoughts on a blackboard cube installed outside Usdan University Center.

Laura McIntyre ’17 brought the “Before I Die” public art project to Wesleyan the week of April 20. Members of the Wesleyan community were asked to fill in their fears, ambitions and thoughts on a blackboard cube installed outside Usdan University Center.

#THISISWHY

In this issue of News @ Wes, we speak to Laura McIntyre from the Class of 2017.

Q: Laura, please tell us where you’re from and what you’re majoring in.

A: I’m a sophomore here at Wes. I’m majoring in sociology and am thinking about the film minor. I’m from New York City.

Q: I understand the “Before I Die” public art project has been installed in locations all over the world. When and how did this project come to be?

A: The project was started by an artist named Candy Chang as a personal project after someone close to her died. She used the side of an abandoned building in her neighborhood in New Orleans, and covered it with the statement that’s now been used on all the walls following: “Before I die I want to _______.” To her surprise, people really jumped on the idea and started writing on it. That original wall was made in 2011 and, since then, there have been over 550 renditions.

Q: How did you first learn about the project? Why did you decide to bring it to Wesleyan?

Krishnan Receives Choreomundus Scholars in Residence Award

Professor Hari Krishnan recently received a prestigious award and residency at  the University of Roehampton.

Professor Hari Krishnan recently received a prestigious award and residency at the University of Roehampton.
(photo c/o Stephen De Las Heras)

Hari Krishnan, assistant professor of dance, recently received the Choreomundus Scholars in Residence Award, which will support a three-week residence at the University of Roehampton in London, beginning May 18. During his residency, Krishnan will teach and mentor Choreomundus students who are working on their final project.

(photo c/o Michael Slobodian)

(photo c/o Michael Slobodian)

Krishnan expressed excitement over his award: “I am delighted and honored to be one of two recipients of the prestigious Erasmus Mundus grant for visiting scholars to the “Choreomundus International Masters in Dance Knowledge, Practice and Heritage” at the University of Roehampton’s Department of Dance in London.”

ICPP Receives $100K Doris Duke Grant

Wesleyan's Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance (ICPP) has received a $100K grant from the Doris Duke Foundation.

Wesleyan’s Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance (ICPP) has received a $100K grant from the Doris Duke Foundation.

Wesleyan’s Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance (ICPP) has been awarded a four-year, $100,000 grant from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation to support the participation of low-income students and students of color in ICPP’s master’s and certificate programs through the ICPP Scholarship Fund.

Founded in 2010 and housed at Wesleyan’s Center for the Arts, ICPP is a center for the academic study of the presentation and contextualization of contemporary performance, and offers an interdisciplinary, graduate-level education in innovative and relevant curatorial approaches to developing and presenting time-based art. Starting in July 2015, the institute will offer a master’s degree in performance curation. ICPP’s ten-month, post-graduate certificate program is now in its fourth year.

“We are extremely grateful for the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation’s critical support for the Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance’s expanded offerings,” said ICPP Director Samuel A. Miller ’75. “These funds will allow us to significantly enhance access to both our master’s and certificate programs.”

Krishna Winston Memorializes Gunter Grass

Krishna Winston

Krishna Winston

When the Nobel Prize-winning German writer Günter Grass died at age 87 this week, The Wall Street Journal turned to Krishna Winston, his translator, for perspective on his life.

According to the Journal’s obituary, Grass was Germany’s best-known contemporary writer “who explored the country’s postwar guilt and in 2006 admitted to serving in one of the Nazis’ most notorious Nazi military units.”

Winston remembered Grass as “a gregarious man who loved cooking and invited his children to sit in on meetings with translators that often lasted several days…”

Humanities Hosts Queer Art Poetics Conference April 23-25

queerartconference(By Lily Baggot ’15)

Later this month, scholars from across the country will gather on campus for the Queer/Art/Poetics Conference. The conference, which will run from April 23-24, is sponsored by the Center for the Humanities and will address questions such as “What does theory do when it takes queer art seriously?” and “How does queer theory remain artful while unpacking the objects, strategies and politics of queer aesthetics?”

Baerman’s Ensemble Performs The Rock World Premiere During Wesleyan Jazz Orchestra Weekend April 22-25

The 14th annual Wesleyan Jazz Orchestra Weekend will take place April 22-25 at the Center for the Arts. Noah Baerman, visiting instructor in music and jazz ensemble coach, will present the Music Department Colloquium on April 22.

Pianist, composer, educator and author Noah Baerman, visiting instructor in music and jazz ensemble coach, will present the Music Department Colloquium on April 22 as part of the 14th annual Wesleyan Jazz Orchestra Weekend.

The Center for the Arts will host the 14th annual Wesleyan Jazz Orchestra Weekend April 22-25.

On April 22, Noah Baerman, visiting instructor in music and jazz ensemble coach, will present the Music Department Colloquium at 4:15 p.m. in the Daltry Room, Music Rehearsal Hall Room 003. The event is free. During the colloquium, Baerman will discuss the philosophical origins and musical development of his suite The Rock and the Redemption in anticipation of its premiere on April 25. 

Art on Display at Senior Thesis Exhibition

View the talents of senior art studio majors during the 2015 Senior Thesis Exhibition at the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery through April 19. The gallery is open noon to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday and is free of charge.

In the final year of study, each student develops a focused body of work, and mounts a solo exhibition in the Zilkha Gallery. This exhibition is the culmination of a two-semester thesis tutorial, and is developed in close critical dialogue with a faculty advisor. The exhibition is critiqued by the faculty advisor and a second critic, and must be passed by a vote of the faculty of the art studio program. The senior thesis exhibition provides a rare opportunity for the student to engage in a rigorous, self-directed creative investigation and in a public dialogue about his/her work.

Photos of Week 1 and Week 2 of the Senior Thesis Exhibit are below:

RETURN TO: Paradise by Gabe Gordon ’15.

“RETURN TO: Paradise” by Gabe Gordon ’15.