Arts & Culture

British History Class Takes Field Trip to Yale’s British Art Center

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On Oct. 7, students enrolled in the course HIST 269: Notes from a Small Island — Modern British History, 1700 – Present, visited the Yale Center for British Art.

The class, taught by Alice Kelly, visiting assistant professor of history, toured the center’s two current exhibitions, “Sculpture Victorious: Art in an Age of Invention, 1837–1901″ and “Figures of Empire: Slavery and Portraiture in 18 Century Atlantic Britain.”

“Seeing history through a different lens — art and sculpture — really aided their understanding of some of the class readings, and we were able to find a number of similarities, particularly in the Figures of Empire exhibition,” Kelly said.

Kelly’s course offers a survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural history of Britain since the beginning of the 18th century and traces the movement into modernity. Topics covered include the Acts of Union, the Jacobite Rising, the Napoleonic Wars, imperial expansion, the Slavery Abolition Act, the Industrial Revolution, the development of mass literacy, the Edwardian era, the First World War, the Second World War and the Blitz, the end of empire, the Sexual Revolution and the Swinging Sixties, and contemporary multicultural Britain. Read more about the HIST 269 course here.

Wesleyan Presents Muslim Women’s Voices

Pam Tatge, director of the Center of the Arts, was a guest on WNPR’s “Where We Live” to discuss a year-long program at Wesleyan looking at Muslim women’s voices through the lens of the arts.

“What we’re doing is really looking at the complexity of Muslim women today through the various performance modes that there are around the world. What that means is we are bringing artists in to be embedded in courses across the university–gender studies classes, Arabic classes, French classes, government classes–and then also do a performance,” said Tatge. “It’s the combination of the curricular integration and the performance that’s really going to allow us to have conversations with our community and our campus around some of the issues.”

Riffat Sultana, a Sufi fusion singer who will perform at Wesleyan on Nov. 7, was also a guest on the show.

Learn more about Muslim Women’s Voices at Wesleyan here.

Davison Art Center’s 19th Century Goya Print Exhibited in Boston

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Francisco Goya’s portrait of the French printer Cyprien Gaulon will be on exhibit at Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts. The print is owned by Wesleyan’s Davison Art Center.

One of Davison Art Center’s most important works – an early 19th century Francisco Goya lithograph – will be shown in a major art exhibit in Boston this fall.

The print, a portrait of the printer Cyprien-Charles-Marie Nicolas Gaulon, was made at the end of Goya’s life, between 1825 and 1826, and is one of only two known “first state” copies of the work (the other is in France’s Bibliotheque Nationale).  Gaulon taught Goya lithography during the artist’s senescent exile in Bordeaux.

“It’s a portrait of a friend, the man who taught him this technique, towards the end of his life,”  said Clare Rogan, curator of the DAC. “It’s a view onto Goya’s life at the time.”

The print was lent last month to the Museum of Fine Arts, where it will be exhibited in “Goya: Order and Disorder” Oct. 12-Jan. 19. The largest Goya exhibit in North America in 25 years, the show will include everything from the portraits of aristocrats that established his reputation to the prints and drawings that carried the Spanish artist’s fame beyond his country.

WesSukkah Houses 5th Year of Sukkot Festivities at Wesleyan

The Wesleyan Sukkah (WesSukkah), is celebrating its fifth anniversary this month while providing a dwelling for Wesleyan's Jewish community to celebrate the festival of Sukkot. For eight days, students study, socialize, mediate, eat, host events and occasionally sleep in the religious building.

The Wesleyan Sukkah (WesSukkah), is celebrating its fifth anniversary this month while providing a dwelling for Wesleyan’s Jewish community to celebrate the festival of Sukkot. For eight days, students study, socialize, mediate, eat, host events and occasionally sleep in the religious building.

WesSukkah, pictured here on Oct. 7, is a temporary structure located on the lawn of Olin Library.

WesSukkah, pictured here on Oct. 7, is a temporary structure located on the lawn of Olin Library.

Wesleyan Employees Artwork on Display in Usdan

Several Wesleyan staff members are displaying their artwork in the Ring Family Lobby gallery this month at Usdan University Center. The show represents a small slice of creative works by Wesleyan employees.

Several Wesleyan staff members are displaying their artwork in the Ring Family Lobby gallery this month at Usdan University Center. The show represents a small slice of creative works by Wesleyan employees.

Ali McFadzen, department assistant for the Financial Aid Office, is displaying a photograph of College Row titled Campus Flare.

Ali McFadzen, department assistant for the Financial Aid Office, is displaying a photograph of South College and Memorial Chapel at sunrise titled “Campus.”

Eiko Performs “A Body in a Station”

The New York Times featured a new performance by Visiting Instructor in Dance Eiko Otake, the first she has conceived and performed without Koma, her husband and artistic partner. Titled “A Body in a Station,” the work, presented by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, develops as a series of three-hour performances once a week. The museum is also featuring a exhibition of photography by William Johnston, professor of history, professor of East Asian studies, professor of science in society. The photographs show Eiko performing in abandoned train stations in Fukushima, Japan.

“The images, elegant, bleak and harrowing, place her in a desolate landscape devastated by the explosions at the Fukushima nuclear power plant after the 2011 earthquake and tsunami,”  the Times writes.

Garcia ’88 Leads Dwight Greene Symposium, Screens New Basketball Documentary

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World-renowned DJ, radio personality, streetball player and sneaker guru Robert ‘Bobbito’ Garcia ’88 led a movie screening and talkback during the 22nd Annual Dwight L. Greene Symposium, Sept. 26 in the Goldsmith Family Cinema. Garcia spoke about his journey to Wesleyan and beyond, in addition to sharing his award-winning independent documentary Doin’ it in the Park, which explores the history, culture, and social impact of New York’s summer basketball scene.

Shot at 180 courts in 75 days, the film covers a cross-section of players both professional and amateur, including Julius “Dr. J” Erving, Kenny Smith, “Pee Wee” Kirkland, “Fly” Williams, God Shammgod, Tim “Headache” Gittens, Corey “Homicide” Williams, Kenny Anderson, Jack Ryan, Richard “Crazy Legs” Colon, Niki Avery, Milani Malik, and the Park Pick-Up Players of New York City. The filmmakers traveled to most of the film locations by bicycle, carrying camera equipment and a basketball in their backpacks.

Shot at 180 courts in 75 days, the film covers a cross-section of players both professional and amateur, including Julius “Dr. J” Erving, Kenny Smith, “Pee Wee” Kirkland, “Fly” Williams, God Shammgod, Tim “Headache” Gittens, Corey “Homicide” Williams, Kenny Anderson, Jack Ryan, Richard “Crazy Legs” Colon, Niki Avery, Milani Malik, and the Park Pick-Up Players of New York City. The filmmakers traveled to most of the film locations by bicycle, carrying camera equipment and a basketball in their backpacks.

Gilvarry Named “5 Under 35″ Award Winner from National Book Foundation

Alex Gilvarry, visiting writer in English

Alex Gilvarry, visiting writer in English.

Alex Gilvarry, visiting writer in English, was named a “5 Under 35″ award recipient from the National Book Foundation.

Gilvarry is the author of From the Memoirs of a Non-Enemy Combatant, published by Viking/Penguin Group in January 2012. He was selected for the award by 1993 National Book Award Finalist Amy Bloom, the Distinguished University Writer-in-Residence and Director of the Shapiro Center for Creative Writing.

Gilvarry was born in Staten Island, N.Y. in 1981. He holds an MFA from Hunter College and has been a Norman Mailer Fellow and a visiting scholar at the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas, Austin. His first novel, From the Memoirs of a Non-Enemy Combatant, won the Hornblower Award at the 2012 New York City Book Awards. He is an artist-in-residence at Monmouth University and teaches the course, Techniques of Fiction at Wesleyan.

Gilvarry will receive the award during the National Book Foundations’ Ninth Annual Celebration of Emerging Fiction Writers. The “5 Under 35″ authors will be honored at the powerHouse Arena in Brooklyn, N.Y. on Nov. 17.

The Mission of the National Book Foundation is to celebrate the best of American literature, to expand its audience, and to enhance the cultural value of good writing in America.

Book Sale Benefits Friends of Wesleyan Library

Friends of the Wesleyan Library hosted their annual fall book sale Sept. 27 in the lobby of Olin Memorial Library.

Friends of the Wesleyan Library hosted their annual fall book sale Sept. 27 in the lobby of Olin Memorial Library.

Student A Capella Groups Perform during Family Weekend

The 4th Annual Stone A Cappella Concert at Memorial Chapel Sept. 28 featured the vocal talent of Wesleyan’s many student a capella groups. The event was part of Wesleyan’s Family Weekend. (Photos by Dat Vu ’15)

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Music of South India Performed at Wesleyan’s Navaratri Festival

As part of Wesleyan's 38th annual Navaratri Festival, the Center for the Arts presented "Vocal Music of South India" Sept. 26 at Crowell Concert Hall.

As part of Wesleyan’s 38th annual Navaratri Festival, the Center for the Arts presented “Vocal Music of South India” Sept. 26 at Crowell Concert Hall. Navaratri is a major Hindu festival and is celebrated all over India for nine nights and 10 days.

Miranda ’02 Speaks on the Origins of In the Heights at CFA

On Sept. 23, Tony Award-winning composer/lyricist and actor Lin-Manuel Miranda ’02 spoke about the creation of the musical In The Heights during his time at Wesleyan. His talk, "When You're Home: A Look Back at the Origins of In the Heights," was sponsored by the Theater Department and Center for the Arts.

On Sept. 23, Tony Award-winning composer/lyricist and actor Lin-Manuel Miranda ’02 spoke about the creation of the musical In The Heights during his time at Wesleyan. His talk, “When You’re Home: A Look Back at the Origins of In the Heights,” was sponsored by the Theater Department and Center for the Arts.