Events

WESU Hosts Spring Record Fair April 10

WESUWESU, Wesleyan’s radio station, is hosting its annual Spring Record Fair in Beckham Hall on April 10. From 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., vendors from across the greater Connecticut area will be selling rare records and CDs. Those in attendance will have the opportunity to not only browse through hundreds of records, CDs, posters, and T-shirts, but also enjoy WESU DJs spinning vinyl live.

WESU is one of the oldest non­commercial radio stations in the United States. It offers a diverse mix of news and public affairs from NPR, Pacifica, and independent and local media sources on weekdays; weeknights and weekends are dedicated to Wesleyan students and community volunteer broadcasters, who provide a freeform mix of creative music programming featuring music not readily available elsewhere on the radio.

Tune in to 88.1 FM or online at www.wesufm.org.

President Roth to Discuss Freud at 92Y March 22

Michael Roth

Michael Roth

On March 22, President Michael Roth will participate in a discussion at the 92nd Street Y in New York City with Mark Edmundson of the University of Virginia. The discussion, titled, “Unorthodox: On Philosophy,” will cover Sigmund Freud’s most valuable contributions, why his work matters, why it has faded from view, and whether his thoughts will make a comeback. The talk starts at 7 p.m.

The event is part of a series of programs that take place both at the Jewish Museum and at the 92nd Street Y in conjunction with the exhibition Unorthodox. According to the website, “The accompanying public programs investigate the notion of defying cultural and artistic uniformity.”

For more information on the talk or to purchase tickets, visit the 92Y’s website.

Roth previously spoke at the 92Y in September 2014 as part of the Social Good Summit. Read more here.

FGSS Presents 28th Annual Diane Weiss ’80 Memorial Lecture, Feb. 25

Ann Cvetkovich of the University of Texas–Austin will deliver the 28th annual Diane Weiss ’80 Memorial Lecture on Feb. 25. Her talk, titled, “Archival Turns and Queer Affective Methods,” will be held at 7 p.m. in PAC 001.

Cvetkovich is the Ellen Clayton Garwood Centennial Professor of English and professor of women’s and gender studies at the University of Texas at Austin.  She is the author of Mixed Feelings:  Feminism, Mass Culture, and Victorian Sensationalism (Rutgers, 1992); An Archive of Feelings:  Trauma, Sexuality, and Lesbian Public Cultures (Duke, 2003); and Depression: A Public Feeling (Duke, 2012).  She co-edited (with Ann Pellegrini) “Public Sentiments,” a special issue of The Scholar and Feminist Online, and (with Janet Staiger and Ann Reynolds) Political Emotions (Routledge, 2010).   She has been coeditor, with Annamarie Jagose, of GLQ:  A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies. She is writing a book about the current state of LGBTQ archives and the creative use of them by artists to produce counterarchives and interventions in public history. For additional info, visit her website.

Weiss Lecture 2016 poster

Inequality, Concept of Race Topics of American Studies Lecture

Barbara Fields. (Photo courtesy of Columbia University)

Barbara Fields. (Photo courtesy of Columbia University)

Barbara Fields, professor of history at Columbia University, will deliver the third annual Richard Slotkin American Studies Lecture Series from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Feb. 17 in Russell House.

Fields’ lecture will draw on the intellectually transformative book she published with her sister, Karen Elise Fields, titled Racecraft: The Soul of Inequality in American Life (Verso, 2012).

“Her lecture—her thinking about how the forms of racecraft and how racecraft is pulled off—could not be more timely and urgent,” said Joel Pfister, the Olin Professor of American Studies and English, chair of the American Studies Department. “Her work on the category of ‘race’ offers conceptually rigorous historical, cultural and social analyses, as well as illuminating experiences from her own life.”

Fields is a former MacArthur Fellow, the president of the Southern Historical Association and a winner of the Columbia University Teaching Award. At Columbia, she specializes in southern history and 19th-century social history. She received her BA from Harvard (1968) and her PhD from Yale (1978).

The event is sponsored by the American Studies Department and co-sponsored by the Center for the Humanities, Theory Certificate and the African American Studies Program.

Refreshments will be served following the lecture.

Allbritton Center to Host Series of Panels on the Refugee Crisis

RefugeePanel1

 

The Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life will host a series of three panels in February and March on the refugee crisis. All events will take place in PAC 001.

The first panel, The Development of the Crisis and the Response in Europe, will be held at 7 p.m. Feb. 3. Moderated by Professor of Economics Richard Grossman, the panel is comprised of Bruce Masters, the John E. Andrus Professor of History; Robert Ford, former U.S. ambassador to Syria; and Marcie Patton, professor of politics at Fairfield University.

The second panel, The Refugee Experience, will be held at 7 p.m. Feb. 17. Moderated by Victoria Smolkin-Rothrock, assistant professor of history, assistant professor of Russian, Eastern European and Eurasian Studies, it will feature discussion between Steve Poellot, legal director at the International Refugee Assistance Project (IRAP); Mohammed Kadalah, of the University of Connecticut Department of Literature, Cultures and Languages, who was recently granted asylum after fleeing Syria in 2011; and Baselieus Zeno, a PhD candidate in political science at the University of Massachusetts–Amherst and a Syrian refugee.

The final panel, The U.S. Response, Locally and Nationally, will be held at 7:30 p.m. March 31. Moderated by Assistant Professor of Government Ioana Emy Matesan, the panel will include Christina Pope of Welcoming America; Chris George, director of Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services; and Jen Smyers, director of policy and advocacy at Church World Service. It will also feature a video message from U.S. Senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut.

For more information, contact Rob Rosenthal, director of the Allbritton Center, at rrosenthal@wesleyan.edu.

6 Faculty Deliver Short Lectures at Wesleyan Thinks Big

During Wesleyan Thinks Big, six faculty delivered 10-minute inspirational lectures on topics they are personally passionate about. The student-run event took place Dec. 10 in Memorial Chapel.

During Wesleyan Thinks Big, six faculty delivered 10-minute inspirational lectures on topics they are personally passionate about. The student-run event took place Dec. 10 in Memorial Chapel.

Victoria Pitts-Taylor, professor of Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, professor of science in society, professor of sociology, will spoke on “Waiting: Hospital, Hospice, Asylum.”

Victoria Pitts-Taylor, professor of feminist, gender, and sexuality studies, professor of science in society, professor of sociology, spoke on “Waiting: Hospital, Hospice, Asylum.”

Yamil Velez, assistant professor of government, spoke on “How to Build a Wall: Immigration and Nativism in the 21st Century."

Yamil Velez, assistant professor of government, spoke on “How to Build a Wall: Immigration and Nativism in the 21st Century.”

Long Bui, visiting assistant professor of American studies, spoke on "Ethnic Studies and the Next American Revolution."

Long Bui, visiting assistant professor of American studies, spoke on “Ethnic Studies and the Next American Revolution.”

Tula Telfair, professor of art, spoke on “Art Reveals Ourselves."

At left, Tula Telfair, professor of art, spoke on “Art Reveals Ourselves.”

Mike Robinson, assistant professor of psychology, assistant professor of neuroscience and behavior, spoke on "Unconscious Desires."

Mike Robinson, assistant professor of psychology, assistant professor of neuroscience and behavior, spoke on “Unconscious Desires.”

At right, Priscilla Meyer, professor of Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies, spoke on "The Ripple Effect."

At right, Priscilla Meyer, professor of Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies, spoke on “The Ripple Effect.”

The Fall 2015 Wesleyan Thinks Big was funded by the Student Budget Committee and the Office of Student Activities and Leadership Development, and was organized by Emma Koramshahi, Wayne Ng '16, Catherine Wulff '18 and Erica Yim '19. "As students at Wesleyan, we have the opportunity to engage with brilliant and passionate professors. It is really important that we are be able to bring Wesleyan Thinks Big back to campus," Koramshahi said.

The Fall 2015 Wesleyan Thinks Big was funded by the Student Budget Committee and the Office of Student Activities and Leadership Development, and was organized by Emma Koramshahi, Wayne Ng ’16, Catherine Wulff ’18 and Erica Yim ’19. “As students at Wesleyan, we have the opportunity to engage with brilliant and passionate professors. It is really important that we are be able to bring Wesleyan Thinks Big back to campus,” Koramshahi said.

Patricelli Center to Host Social Impact Summit, Nov. 13-14

URAL15241_ShashaSummitPostcard_0811_smj-1On Nov. 13-14 Wesleyan will host the inaugural Social Impact Summit, a gathering of alumni and parents who are passionately working for social change on a local, national and global scale. The summit is underwritten by James Shasha ’50, P’82, and organized by the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship, the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life, and the Office of Alumni and Parent Relations.

Many alumni joke about the “Wesleyan Film Mafia” but less well-known is the “Wesleyan Social Impact Mafia,” a large web of alumni engaged in social impact work.

Homecoming/Family Weekend is Nov. 6-8

In advance of Wesleyan football's Homecoming match, various athletic teams host tailgates on Andrus Field for family, friends and alumni, with concessions provided by the baseball and softball teams. (Photo by John Van Vlack)

In advance of Wesleyan football’s Homecoming match, various athletic teams host tailgates on Andrus Field for family, friends and alumni, with concessions provided by the baseball and softball teams. (Photo by John Van Vlack)

The entire Wesleyan community is invited to Homecoming/Family Weekend Nov. 6-8 to experience life at Wesleyan and reunite with friends and family.

Events include campus tours, WESeminars, multiple art exhibitions, a Career Center open house and Summer Experience Showcase, a family swim, “Mass Incarceration: Feminist Responses” symposium, an Asian American Arts Festival, the annual Homecoming/Family Weekend Dinner, the 12th annual Schumann Symposium “Where on Earth Are We Going?,” a Friends of the Wesleyan Library book sale, a president’s reception honoring leadership donors and volunteers, a West African Drumming performance, an A Capella concert and much more. A special celebration honoring Wesleyan’s recently-retired alumni director John Driscoll ’62 will be held Nov. 6.

Tailgating for football, baseball, softball, women’s basketball, football, women’s lacrosse, squash, track and field and wrestling will be held near their respective playing areas between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. on Nov. 7. Come cheer on the Cardinals to victory as they play William College at 1 p.m. in the annual Homecoming game.

View the entire schedule of events online here.

Register for HCFW online here. Check-in hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Nov. 6; 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Nov. 7; and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 8 inside Usdan University Center.

For more information e-mail parents@wesleyan.edu or hcfw@wesleyan.edu.

“Mass Incarceration: Feminists Respond” Focus of FGSS Symposium Nov. 6

Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies will host its annual symposium on Nov. 6. This year’s topic is “Mass Incarceration: Feminists Respond.” The event is free and open to the public.

“As Angela Davis has written, state punishment is not marginal, but central, to feminist concerns,” said Victoria Pitts-Taylor, professor and chair of Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies, of the program’s theme. “To begin with, the number of incarcerated women has been growing rapidly, with over one million women in the U.S. in jail, prison, on probation or on parole, and with black women the fastest growing group of those imprisoned. But beyond this, the practices of intensive policing and mass incarceration of people of all genders are devastating whole communities, especially those of poor people of color.

Immigration and Indigeneity Topic of Constitution Day Lecture Sept. 17

Bethany Berger '90

Bethany Berger ’90 will deliver Wesleyan’s annual Constitution Day Lecture at 7 p.m. Sept. 17.

Bethany Berger ’90, professor at the University of Connecticut Law School, will lead Wesleyan’s annual Constitution Day Lecture on Sept. 17. The topic is “Birthright Citizenship on Trial — Immigration and Indigeneity.”

Egged on by Donald Trump, the majority of Republican candidates have supported ending birthright citizenship. This talk looks at this 14th amendment right, its constitutional origins, and the different things it meant for American Indians and immigrants.

Berger is the Thomas F. Gallivan, Jr. Professor at the University of Connecticut School of Law. She graduated from Wesleyan in 1990 with a major in government, and from Yale Law School in 1996. After law school, she became the director of the Native American Youth Law Project at DNA-Peoples Legal Services, which serves the Navajo and Hopi reservations, and later the Managing Attorney at Advocates for Children of New York. She is a co-author and member of the Editorial Board of Felix S. Cohen’s Handbook of Federal Indian Law, the foundational treatise in the field, and co-author of leading casebooks in American Indian Law and in Property Law. Her articles on legal history, race, gender and jurisdiction in federal Indian law have been cited in testimony to Congress and several briefs to the Supreme Court. She also has served as a judge for the Southwest Intertribal Court of Appeals and as a visiting professor at Harvard University and the University of Michigan.

In honor of Constitution Day, all educational institutions receiving federal funding are required to hold an educational program pertaining to the U.S. Constitution. The Friends of Olin Library annually supports and coordinates the event.

The event takes place at 7 p.m. in the Smith Reading Room at Olin Library. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, e-mail libfriends@wesleyan.edu.

“After Charleston: Next Steps for the Movement for Social Justice” Topic of Sept. 17 Panel

Pictured, from top, left to right: Bree Newsome, Clemmie Harris, Bishop John Selders and Tedra James '18 will lead a panel at 8 p.m. Sept. 17.  (Click to enlarge poster)

Pictured, from top, left to right: Bree Newsome, Clemmie Harris, Bishop John Selders and Tedra James ’18. (Click to enlarge poster)

Three experts and a Wesleyan student will lead a panel discussion on “After Charleston: Next Steps for the Movement for Social Justice” at 8 p.m. Sept. 17 in Memorial Chapel. The event is sponsored by the Allbritton Center for Public Life.

The talk will feature Clemmie Harris, visiting assistant professor of African American studies; Tedra James ’18; activist and filmmaker Bree Newsome and Connecticut Bishop John Selders.

“The idea is to spur conversation with the audience about the killings in Charleston, reactions to killings, debate over the Confederate flag, and protests in Ferguson,” said Rob Rosenthal, director of the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life, John E. Andrus Professor of Sociology. “The question that each speaker will address is, ‘What now? Where are we in this long, long, long struggle for social justice—that is, equal rights, equal opportunities for everyone in the country—and what needs to happen next?’ Each panelist will speak for about 10 minutes, and can respond to anything the other speakers said. Then it will be up to the audience to state their own opinion, and ask questions of the audience.”

Clemmie Harris earned a PhD in history from the University of Pennsylvania. He holds graduate certificates in urban studies and Africana studies and has received fellowships for research in areas such as democracy, citizenship, and constitutionalism and Africana studies. His research interests include the long African American freedom struggle with an emphasis on electoral and protest politics, race and social inequality in the 20th century industrialized urban north; African American political leadership, and black urban political economy.

He is currently working on two book projects: We Will Be Heard: The Struggle For Political Recognition and Civil Rights in Philadelphia, which examines the African American quest for electoral power and community control from 1911 to 1984.