Events

Earth Month Activities Include Speakers, Films

Lynda Nead of the University of London will speak April 14 on "The Tiger in the Smoke: The Aesthetics of Fog in Post-War Britain c. 1945-55" as part of a series of Earth Month events at Wesleyan.

Lynda Nead of the University of London will speak April 14 on “The Tiger in the Smoke: The Aesthetics of Fog in Post-War Britain c. 1945-55” as part of a series of Earth Month events at Wesleyan.

In honor of Earth Month, Wesleyan will host a series of speakers and films beginning April 14.

At 4:15 p.m. on April 14, the College of the Environment will present a talk, “The Tiger in the Smoke: The Aesthetics of Fog in Post-War Britain c. 1945-55,” by Lynda Nead, the Pevsner Professor of History of Art at Birkbeck, University of London. The talk will be in 41 Wyllys, Room 112. It is cosponsored by the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life; the Mellon Fund for Lectures in Ethics, Politics and Social Issues; Art History; History; and the Science in Society Program. The event is free and open to the public.

Allbritton Center to Present Three Panels on “Drugs, Harm and the Campus”

This month, the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life is presenting three linked panels in its Right Now! series titled “Drugs, Harm and the Campus.”

Drug Use @ Wes

At 4:30 on April 7, Michael Whaley, vice president for student affairs, will moderate a panel discussion, “What are we doing about drugs at Wes and why?” Tanya Purdy, director of health education at WesWELL; Beth DeRicco, higher education outreach at Caron Treatment Centers; and Ashley Fine ’15 will discuss education, support and policies at Wesleyan. The event will be held in PAC 002.

Humanities Hosts Queer Art Poetics Conference April 23-25

queerartconference(By Lily Baggot ’15)

Later this month, scholars from across the country will gather on campus for the Queer/Art/Poetics Conference. The conference, which will run from April 23-24, is sponsored by the Center for the Humanities and will address questions such as “What does theory do when it takes queer art seriously?” and “How does queer theory remain artful while unpacking the objects, strategies and politics of queer aesthetics?”

Baerman’s Ensemble Performs The Rock World Premiere During Wesleyan Jazz Orchestra Weekend April 22-25

The 14th annual Wesleyan Jazz Orchestra Weekend will take place April 22-25 at the Center for the Arts. Noah Baerman, visiting instructor in music and jazz ensemble coach, will present the Music Department Colloquium on April 22.

Pianist, composer, educator and author Noah Baerman, visiting instructor in music and jazz ensemble coach, will present the Music Department Colloquium on April 22 as part of the 14th annual Wesleyan Jazz Orchestra Weekend.

The Center for the Arts will host the 14th annual Wesleyan Jazz Orchestra Weekend April 22-25.

On April 22, Noah Baerman, visiting instructor in music and jazz ensemble coach, will present the Music Department Colloquium at 4:15 p.m. in the Daltry Room, Music Rehearsal Hall Room 003. The event is free. During the colloquium, Baerman will discuss the philosophical origins and musical development of his suite The Rock and the Redemption in anticipation of its premiere on April 25. 

Graduate Liberal Studies to Host Info Session April 29

gls

Graduate Liberal Studies offers courses in visual arts, art history, creative and professional writing, literature, history, mathematics, film, government, education, biology, psychology, astronomy and more.

 

Graduate Liberal Studies will host an information session for prospective students at 7 p.m. April 29 in the Office of Continuing Studies, 74 Wyllys Ave.

Attendees will meet with Office of Admissions staff, hear a full overview of the program — including curriculum and requirements — and receive materials

Alejandro, Alumnae Collaborate on Choreography Project

Pedro Alejandro

Pedro Alejandro

Pedro Alejandro, associate professor of dance, Brittany Delany ’09 and Sarah Ashkin ’11 are collaborating on a new choreography project in New Mexico.

The project titled “Chancy Dancing” will premier at 8 p.m. April 11 at the Railyard Performance Center in Santa Fe. Marcela Oteiza, assistant professor of theater, is developing the visual design of the work.

The first half of the performance features Ashkin and other local choreographers’ most recent works spanning a spectrum of modern dance, dance theater and improvisational systems.

Siry to Speak at Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences Meeting April 2

The U.S. Capitol offers an illuminating case study of how modern architecture developed mechanically before the current era of sustainability.

The U.S. Capitol offers an illuminating case study of how modern architecture developed mechanically before the current era of sustainability.

Joe Siry

Joe Siry

On April 2, Wesleyan will host the 1,443rd meeting of the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences (the third oldest learned society in the Unites States, chartered in 1799) on campus. To honor the proud occasion, Joseph Siry, professor of art history, the Kenan Professor of the Humanities will give a public lecture presentation about his research.

Siry’s talk, titled “Air Conditioning in the United States Capitol: Architecture, Technology and Congressional Life,” will take place at 5 p.m. in the Center for the Arts Hall. The U.S. Capitol offers an illuminating case study of how modern architecture developed mechanically before the current era of sustainability. This talk examines how air conditioning systems altered patterns of congressional operations during the 1930s and after.

CAAS_LOGO_175pxThe event is free and open to students and the general public.

CDs, Apparel, Music at WESU Spring Record Fair March 28

wesyspringWith more than 20 vendors from throughout New England and the tri-state area selling new and used music in all formats, the 88.1 FM WESU community record fair has become a cherished tradition, attracting a diverse crowd of new and old record collectors.

The WESU Spring 2015 Record Fair will take place from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 28 in Beckham Hall. Browse new and used CDs, records, music-related apparel, books, WESU merchandise and more.

WESU DJs will be spinning records live throughout the day to inspire your crate digging.

“Each vendor will be offering their own unique mix of genres and formats, so there is surely something for every type of collector,” said Ben Michael, WESU general manager. “So come on out in search of that one record you’ve been hunting for and support your favorite community radio station in the process!”

WESU also is accepting donations for the fundraising event.

Now more than 75 years old, WESU is one of the oldest non-commercial radio stations in the United States. By day, Monday through Friday, WESU offers a diverse mix of news and public affairs from NPR, Pacifica, and independent and local media sources. Weeknights and weekends, WESU student and community volunteer broadcasters provide a freeform mix of creative music programming featuring music not readily available elsewhere on the radio.

The station currently broadcasts at the frequency of 88.1 FM from its 6,000-watt transmitter located atop the Exley Science Center with the potential to reach over 1 million listeners throughout Connecticut and Massachusetts. WESU also streams audio online through their website www.wesufm.org.

Celebrate the Sciences at Poster Session April 17

Dozens of students will present their research at the Celebration of Science Theses on April 17.

Dozens of students will present their research at the Celebration of Science Theses on April 17.

The Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division is sponsoring its annual Celebration of Science Theses from 12:30 to 2 p.m. April 17 in Exley Science Center.

Poster presentations will be made by NSM honors and MA students. Refreshments will be provided. The entire Wesleyan community is invited.

“Come join us in appreciation of our students’ achievements,” said Manju Hingorani, professor of molecular biology and biochemistry.

The event is co-organized by Hingorani; Barbara Juhasz, associate professor of psychology, associate professor of neuroscience and behavior, director of the Service Learning Center; and Seth Redfield, assistant professor of astronomy.

Obama’s “Auto Czar” Rob Bloom ’77 to Speak on Campus April 8

Ron Bloom '77

Ron Bloom ’77

The Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life welcomes “auto czar” Ron Bloom ’77 to campus April 8.

Bloom will speak on “We almost lost Detroit: A hopeful tale about cars, crises, cities and America,” at 7:30 p.m. in PAC 001.

After graduating from Wesleyan with a BA in history in 1977, Bloom received an MBA with distinction from the Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration in 1985. After working as the assistant to the president for United Steelworkers, Bloom was appointed by President Obama be the senior advisor to the Secretary of the Treasury on the President’s Task Force on the Automotive Industry. In this role, the “auto czar” presided over the restructuring of General Motors and Chrysler as the government attempted to bail out both companies.

In 2011, he worked as the assistant to the president for manufacturing policy at the White House, providing leadership on policy development and strategic planning for the administration’s agenda to revitalize the manufacturing sector. Bloom led the discussions with the auto industry which resulted in the industry’s support for new standards that will double the fuel economy of cars and light trucks, saving consumers over $1.7 trillion and reducing oil consumption by 2 million barrels per day.

Bloom currently is vice chairman of U.S. Investment Banking at Lazard where he focuses on mergers and acquisitions, restricting and infrastructure.

On April 29, 2010, he was named as one of Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in the World in the category of World Leaders. In the Time 100 issue, Bill Saporito wrote that “his role in brokering the rescue of General Motors and Chrysler while preserving more than 100,000 jobs demanded a synergist who could work both sides of the equation with authority and respect.”

In addition to the evening talk, Bloom will meet with students enrolled in Professor of History Ron Schatz’s American Labor History class, and also with selected students and faculty in Woodhead Lounge at 4:30 p.m. Anyone interested in participating in the informal conversation should RSVP to Rob Rosenthal, director of the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life, at rrosenthal@wesleyan.edu.

New Environmental Film Series to be Presented by COE, CFA

Beginning this month, Wesleyan’s College of the Environment, Center for the Arts and other outside partners will present “The Elements: An Annual Environmental Film Series.”

The first film, Elemental, will be screened at 7:30 p.m. March 30 in the Center for the Arts Hall. The award-winning film follows three activists as they work to protect air, water and earth around the world, and offers a call for global action.

The second film in the series, WATERSHEDwill be screened at 7 p.m. May 4 in Middlesex Community College’s Chapman Hall, 100 Training Hill Rd. in Middletown. Executive produced and narrated by Robert Redford, this film tells the story of threats to the “once-mighty Colorado River, now dammed and diverted and struggling to support 30 million people.” The film offers solutions for “meeting the competing interests of cities, agriculture, industry, recreation, wildlife, and indigenous communities with rights to the waters, and the future of the American West.”

Admission to the screenings is free. For more information about the film series, call 860-685-3733. More information is available on the College of the Environment’s website.

The series is presented in partnership with The Connecticut River Coastal Conservation District, Middlesex Community College Environmental Science Program and The Rockfall Foundation.

Shinohara’s Solo Exhibitions to be Displayed in Japan

keijiMaster printmaker Keiji Shinohara, artist in residence, will have three solo exhibitions in 2015.” The title is “Keiji Shinohara: Woodcut.”

The first will be at the Odakyu Shinjuku Art Salon in Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan March 11-17. For more information call 03-3342-1111 (Japan).

The second show will be at Art Zone-Kaguraoka in Kyoto, Japan May 9-May 25. For more information call o75-754-0155 (Japan).

The exhibition will return to the United States and be on display at the Visual Arts Gallery at Roger Williams University in Bristol, R.I. throughout the month of October.

In addition, Shinohara will be demonstrating Japanese Ukiyo-e printmaking and techniques at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston from noon to 3 p.m. April 6 and April 19. He’ll also lead a workshop at the Penland School of Crafts in Penland, N.C. Aug. 9-21.

Shinohara teaches in the Art and Art History Department and the College of East Asian Studies. While living in Kyoto, he trained for 10 years in the traditional Japanese woodblock printing style known as Ukiyo-e.  The technical foundation for his artwork is rooted in that training, accompanied by techniques of contemporary western printmaking, yet the imagery itself is very different from historical Ukiyo-e.

According to Shinohara’s artist statement, “the story behind the work is very important; there is a sense of narrative that is very private. The feelings and emotions that I convey through these abstract landscapes matter most to me. Almost always my images are of nature, but it is the essence of the landscape that I want to express, not realistic accuracy.”