In the Media

Potter Cited in “Sommers vs. Romulus” Debate

Claire Potter, professor of history, professor of American studies, is cited in the on-going discussion that has been churning for a few months in literary circles regarding American Enterprise Institute scholar Christina Hoff Sommers, a frequent critic of academic feminism, who believes, according to The New Yorker, that many feminist scholars are ” ‘impervious to reasoned criticism’ (she thinks they take things way too personally, and, consumed with effrontery, are unable to correct themselves).” This included Sommers’ critique of particular scholar’s assertion that abuse began with the fabled founder of Rome, Romulus and a massive digression on whether such a person ever existed. However, it is a quote by Potter that brings the discussion back to the cogent point, as well as reality.

McAlister on What Revolution Sounds Like

Elizabeth McAlister, professor of religion, associate professor of African American studies, associate professor of American Studies, continues her participation in a round table on Haitian culture in The New Yorker, discussing the music of revolution in Haiti and why it is so important within the culture.

Rutland: BRIC’s Influence May Be Growing

Peter Rutland, Colin and Nancy Campbell Professor in Global Issues and Democratic Thought, professor of government, has an interesting piece in The Moscow Times regarding a strengthening relationship between Brazil, Russia, India and China, or “BRIC.” The four countries represent powerful economies and may be reacting to opportunities presented by the recent decline of U.S. and European economic influence.

Posner ’09, Odede ’11 to Build School in Kenya

Kennedy Odede ’11 grew up in Kibera, Kenya’s worst slum, taught himself English and made it to Wesleyan. Now, Odede and Jessica Posner ’09 have received a Projects for Peace Grant and is going back to Kibera to build a school for girls. Odede and Posner were also featured on a show on WNPR’s “Where We Live” that focused on “Responding to Needs in Africa.” Their part starts at roughly the 49 minute mark.