Publications

Zeilinga de Boer Author of Book on Geology’s Influence on Connecticut Culture

New book by Jelle Zeilinga de Boer.

New book by Jelle Zeilinga de Boer.

Jelle Zeilinga de Boer, the Harold T. Stearns Professor of Earth Science emeritus, is the author of Stories in Stone: How Geology Influenced Connecticut History and Culture published by Wesleyan University Press in July 2009.

In the 228-paged book, geoscientist Zeilinga de Boer describes how early settlers discovered and exploited Connecticut’s natural resources. Their successes as well as failures form the very basis of the state’s history: Chatham’s gold played a role in the acquisition of its Charter, and Middletown’s lead helped the colony gain its freedom during the Revolution. Fertile soils in the Central Valley fueled the state’s development into an agricultural power house, and iron ores discovered in the western highlands helped trigger its manufacturing eminence. The Statue of Liberty, a quintessential symbol of America, rests on Connecticut’s Stony Creek granite. Geology not only shaped the state’s physical landscape, but also provided an economic base and played a cultural role by inspiring folklore, paintings, and poems.

Illuminated by 50 illustrations and 12 color plates, Stories in Stone describes the marvel of Connecticut’s geologic diversity and also recounts the impact of past climates, earthquakes, and meteorites on the lives of the people who made Connecticut their home.

The book is available online from The University Press of New England.

Physics Group Published in Physical Review Letters

Tsampikos Kottos, assistant professor of physics; Moritz Hiller, a former visiting scientist; and Katrina Smith-Mannshott BA ’08, MA ’09 are the co-authors of the article, “Occupation Statistics of a BEC for a Driven Landau-Zener Crossing,” published in Physical Review Letters, Issue 102, in 2009.

Thomas’s Paper on Foraminifera Published by Academy of Sciences

Ellen Thomas

Ellen Thomas

A paper co-authored by Ellen Thomas, research professor of earth and environmental sciences, was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, July 2009.

In the article, “Surviving mass extinction by bridging the benthic/planktic divide,” Thomas and her colleagues show a very unexpected observations, i.e. that a species of foraminifera, which lives floating in the surface waters of the Indian Ocean, is genetically the same as a species living on the bottom of the ocean in shallow waters (between tide levels, coast of Kenya) – using DNA analysis.

“We then show, using a sophisticated way of chemical analysis, that it was not just blown there by storms, but formed its shell there in the surface waters,” Thomas explains. “We then interpret these data, and argument that such species that live both on the bottom and floating in surface waters (until now unknown for foraminifera) are much better able to survive the adverse environmental effects at such times as the meteorite impact that resulted in the extinction of the dinosaurs.”

The story is written up by the UK counterpart of the National Science Foundation (NERC), which funded the first author of the paper, Kate Darling.

Kottos Co-Author Article in Physics Publication

Tsampikos Kottos, assistant professor of physics, and Moritz Hiller are co-authors of the article “Wave-packet dynamics in energy space of a chaotic trimeric Bose-Hubbard system,” published Physical Review A Issue 79, No. 023621 in 2009.

Armstrong-Roche Author of Book on Cervantes

Michael Armstrong-Roche, associate professor of romance languages and literatures, associate professor of medieval studies, is the author of Cervantes’ Epic Novel: Empire, Religion, and the Dream Life of Heroes in Persiles, published by the University of Toronto Press in May 2009.

New book by Michael Armstrong-Roche.

New book by Michael Armstrong-Roche.

The 384-page study sets out to help restore Persiles to pride of place within Cervantes’s corpus by reading it as the author’s summa, as a boldly new kind of prose epic that casts an original light on the major political, religious, social, and literary debates of its era. At the same time it seeks to illuminate how such a lofty and solemn ambition could coexist with Cervantes’ evident urge to delight.

Grounded in the novel’s multiple contexts – literature, history and politics, philosophy and theology – and “in close reading of the text, Michael Armstrong-Roche aims to reshape our understanding of Persiles within the history of prose fiction and to take part in the ongoing conversation about the relationship between literary and non-literary cultural forms. Ultimately he reveals how Cervantes recast the prose epic, expanding it in new directions to accommodate the great epic themes – politics, love, and religion – to the most urgent concerns of his day.”

Yohe Authors Carbon, Climate Change Articles

Gary Yohe, the Woodhouse/Sysco Professor of Economics, is the co-author of “Risk Aversion, Time Preference, and the Social Cost of Carbon,” published in Environmental Research Letters 4: 024002, 2009 and available at IDEAS /RePEc http://ideas.repec.org/p/esr/wpaper/wp252.html as well as http://stacks.iop.org/1748-9326/4/024002.

He’s also the author of “Discounting for Climate Change,” published in an Economics e-Journal special issue on Discounting the Long-Run Future and Sustainable Development, 2009; available at http://www.economics-ejournal.org/special-areas/special-issues.

McAlister Essay Selected for Prominent American Studies Book

Liza McAlister's essay is featured in the book American Studies.

Liza McAlister's essay is featured in the book American Studies.

An essay titled “The Madonna of 115th Street Revisited: Vodou and Haitian Catholicism in the Age of Transnationalism,” by Liza McAlister, associate professor of religion, associate professor of African American studies, associate professor of American studies, has been selected as a “key essay” in the book, American Studies: An Anthology. American Studies is a vigorous, bold account of the changes in the field of American studies over the last 35 years. Through this set of carefully selected key essays by an editorial board of expert scholars, the book demonstrates how changes in the field have produced new genealogies that tell different histories of both America and the study of America. American Studies is edited by Janice Radway.

Barth Authors Article on Children’s Mathematical Thinking

Hilary Barth, assistant professor of psychology, assistant professor of neuroscience and behavior, is the lead author of a new article on the intuitive foundations of children’s mathematical thinking. The article, co-authored with collaborators at Harvard University, is titled “Children’s multiplicative transformations of discrete and continuous quantities.” It will appear in the Journal of Experimental Child Psychology in 2009, in a special issue devoted to the typical development of numerical cognition.