Snapshots

Students Attend Prop. 8 Reading at Wellesley College

Students

Pictured, from left, Cherrie Moraga, poet/writer and Demian Pritchard, visiting assistant professor of Latina/o literature and culture in the English Department, pose for a photograph with Wesleyan students Emily Evnen '10, Alicia Garrison '09, Hope Steinman-Iacullo '09, Elizabeth Busch '10, Dan Heinrich Manuyag '10, Elissa Martel '10, and Christie Kontopidis '10.

A group of Wesleyan students, led by Demian Pritchard, visiting assistant professor of Latina/o literature and culture in the English Department, attended a reading by Cherríe Moraga at Wellesley College Nov. 20.

Moraga is an influential and prolific Chicana lesbian writer of poetry, drama and essays. She is known for mixing genre in her writing as she engages issues of sexuality, race, gender and class – alongside questions of nation and language.

Her reading was titled “Still Loving in the Still War Years,” a play on the title of one of her most widely read books: Loving in the War Years, and inspired by the recent California passage of Proposition 8 barring the right for gays and lesbians to marry in the state – a right won in California recently, and quickly lost.

Moraga read from an in-process essay about her relationships with her mother and her teenage son as a frame for her reading from another in- process essay on President-elect Obama. In her essay she called upon the nation to remember its responsibility to continue to participate in the process of “change” asked for by Obama – to transform the work gone into his election inspired by “the audacity of hope” to a long-term politics of continued participation, which she called “the tenacity of hope.”

(Photo and text contributed by Demian Pritchard)

Author, Researcher Speaks on Government Secrets

State Secrecy and the Limits of the Visible," Dec. 4 at the Eclectic Society. Paglen studies secret government programs from both a political and aesthetic perspective. His talk focused on the secret or "black world" of the military, which is composed of programs, people and places that are officially unacknowledged.

Trevor Paglen from the University of California Berkeley's Department of Geography, spoke on "Blank Spots on a Map: State Secrecy and the Limits of the Visible," Dec. 4 at the Eclectic Society. Paglen studies secret government programs from both a political and aesthetic perspective. His talk focused on the secret or "black world" of the military, which is composed of programs, people and places that are officially unacknowledged.

Choreography Workshop Students Perform in Winter Dance

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More than 70 Wesleyan students took part in the Winter Dance Concert Dec. 5 and 6 in the Center for the Arts Theater. The annual concert showcases the work of dance majors completing Choreography Workshop. Pictured are Sheryl Sinclair '09 and Collin Cutrone McMichael '09 performing a dance titled "unto i lovE: an anagram" by Yumin He '09.

Servers, Printing Labs Part of ITS Open House

Ganesan "Ravi" Ravishanker, associate vice president for Information Technology Services, introduces himself to Dena Matthews, publication production manager, during the Information Technology Services open house Nov. 12. Matthews was learning about ITS's New Media Lab from Melissa Datre, director of the New Media Lab, pictured at right.

Ganesan "Ravi" Ravishanker, associate vice president for Information Technology Services, welcomes Dena Matthews, publication production manager, to the "Backstage at Information Technology Services" open house Nov. 12. Matthews was learning about ITS's New Media Lab from Melissa Datre, director of the New Media Lab, pictured at right.

Plass Leads Discussion on Franz Kafka

Ulrich Plass, assistant professor of German, presented a talk titled "Franz Kafka and the State of Exception" Nov. 17 in Russell House. In this lecture, Plass examined the topological structure of Kafka's parables against the backdrop of philosophical interpretations that seek to illuminate the hidden political significance of his stories. Many of Kafka's stories address problems of law, justice and violence.

Ulrich Plass, assistant professor of German, presented a talk titled "Franz Kafka and the State of Exception" Nov. 17 in Russell House. In this lecture, Plass examined the topological structure of Kafka's parables against the backdrop of philosophical interpretations that seek to illuminate the hidden political significance of his stories. Many of Kafka's stories address problems of law, justice and violence.

Farmers Market Begins Winter Schedule

The Wesleyan Farmers Market moved inside

Jane Sibley, owner of Auntie Arwen’s Spices/The Crystal Connection of Haddam, Conn., sells homemade spice/herb/seasoning blends and herbal teas during the Wesleyan Farmers Market Nov. 19 in Beckham Hall. The student-run market, which is committed to supporting local agriculture, moved to a winter schedule. The market will continue to be held inside Beckham Hall on Dec. 3; Jan. 28, 2009, Feb. 11 and Feb. 25, 2009.

Doctor Provides Tips on Surviving Cold and Flu Season

Lisa Currie, foreground, listens to

In foreground, Lisa Currie, director of health education, listens to Dr. Brett Lieberman discuss "Keeping Healthy during the Cold and Flu Season" Nov. 19 in the Public Affairs Center. Dr. Lieberman, who visited Wesleyan from the Connecticut Center for Health, offered tips on bolstering the immune system.

Visiting Writer Michael Ondaatje Speaks on Fiction Works

Writer and poet Michael Ondaatje, Wesleyan's Joan Jakobson Visiting Writer, led a question and answer discussion for students Nov. 6 in Downey House. Among his best-known works are the novel <i>The English Patient</i>, which was made into an award-winning feature film, and a novel set in Sri Lanka, <i>Anil's Ghost</i>, which received world-wide acclaim, winning France’s Prix Medicis, Canada's Governor-General's Award, the Irish Times International Fiction Prize and the Kiriyama Pacific Rim Book Prize.

Writer and poet Michael Ondaatje, Wesleyan's Joan Jakobson Visiting Writer, led a question and answer discussion for students Nov. 6 in Downey House. Among his best-known works are the novel The English Patient, which was made into an award-winning feature film, and a novel set in Sri Lanka, Anil's Ghost, which received world-wide acclaim, winning France’s Prix Medicis, Canada's Governor-General's Award, the Irish Times International Fiction Prize and the Kiriyama Pacific Rim Book Prize.