Students

Men’s Soccer Victory Highlight of Wesleyan Homecoming Sporting Events

Wesleyan cheerleaders root on the Cardinals during the annual Homecoming football game against Amherst College, Oct. 18. The team fell to its rivals in overtime, 33-30, the team's first loss of the year.

Wesleyan cheerleaders root on the Cardinals during the annual Homecoming football game against Amherst College, Oct. 18. The team fell to its rivals in overtime, 33-30. This was the Cardinals’ first loss of the year. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

Scoring the “golden goal” in the 95th minute during Wesleyan's Homecoming game Oct. 18, Adam Cowie-Haskell ’18 netted his fourth goal of the year and second game-winner in propelling men’s soccer past Amherst 2-1.

Scoring the “golden goal” in the 95th minute during Wesleyan’s Homecoming game Oct. 18, Adam Cowie-Haskell ’18 netted his fourth goal of the year and second game-winner in propelling men’s soccer past Amherst 2-1. (Photo by Peter Stein ’84)

During Homecoming, men’s soccer highlighted the day with a 2-1 overtime win against Amherst College to gain a share of the Little Three title. Adam Cowie-Haskell ’18 delivered the golden goal as Wesleyan handed Amherst, ranked 10th nationally, its first loss against a NESCAC rival in three years, spanning 37 games.

Also scoring his third goal of the year in the game was Matt Lynch ’15, as he spotted the Cardinals a 1-0 lead in the second half. Goalie Emmett McConnell ’15 posted seven saves, five in the second half, in holding Amherst to a lone goal.

Football led a good portion of its homecoming game against Amherst before falling in overtime, 33-30, the team’s first loss of the year. Quarterback Jesse Warren ’15

WESU Seeking Donations for Fall Record Fair Oct. 26

Hundreds of vinyl records and CDs will be for sale during the WESU 88.1 FM Fall Record Fair.

Hundreds of vinyl records and CDs will be for sale during the WESU 88.1 FM Fall Record Fair.

WESU 88.1 FM will host a Fall Record Fair from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 26 in Beckham Hall.

Dozens of vendors from across the Northeast will be selling vinyl records, CDs, posters, T-shirts and more. WESU DJs will sell WESU gear and records to support the station. The station also is seeking donations to be sold at the event.

“Cleaning out your shelves but can’t make it to the event? Please consider donating your records for WESU to sell to aid in our fundraising efforts,” said WESU member Tess Altman ’17. “Come support the station and invite your friends! Why? You can’t scratch an MP3.”

Wesleyan Battles for Homecoming Victory Against Amherst Oct. 18

Wesleyan student-athlete Jesse Warren '15 will start as quarterback in the Homecoming Day game, Oct. 18 against Amherst College. Warren leads the conference in passing efficiency (154.9) and has a league-best seven touch down tosses while throwing no interceptions. (Photo by Brian Katten)

Wesleyan student-athlete Jesse Warren ’15 will start as quarterback in the Homecoming Day game, Oct. 18 against Amherst College. Warren leads the conference in passing efficiency (154.9) and has a league-best seven touch down tosses while throwing no interceptions. (Photo by Brian Katten)

It’s a long rivalry. Wesleyan and Amherst have played nearly every year since 1913, missing just three seasons during World War II. They first met on the gridiron in 1882,  with Wesleyan prevailing.  The teams will battle for the 120th time during Wesleyan’s Homecoming, Oct. 18.

A webcast of the game is available here.

One aspect of the game is unmistaken. It represents the second straight year both teams bring identical 4-0 records into the encounter.

A Wesleyan triumph would add significant historical perspective to the proceedings. Having ended an 10-year skid versus Amherst last season with a 20-14 road victory, Wesleyan can put back-to-back wins against the Jeffs into the books for the first time since 1992-93. Even more significant, with a 19-17 homecoming win vs. Williams in 2013,

British History Class Takes Field Trip to Yale’s British Art Center

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On Oct. 7, students enrolled in the course HIST 269: Notes from a Small Island — Modern British History, 1700 – Present, visited the Yale Center for British Art.

The class, taught by Alice Kelly, visiting assistant professor of history, toured the center’s two current exhibitions, “Sculpture Victorious: Art in an Age of Invention, 1837–1901″ and “Figures of Empire: Slavery and Portraiture in 18 Century Atlantic Britain.”

“Seeing history through a different lens — art and sculpture — really aided their understanding of some of the class readings, and we were able to find a number of similarities, particularly in the Figures of Empire exhibition,” Kelly said.

Kelly’s course offers a survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural history of Britain since the beginning of the 18th century and traces the movement into modernity. Topics covered include the Acts of Union, the Jacobite Rising, the Napoleonic Wars, imperial expansion, the Slavery Abolition Act, the Industrial Revolution, the development of mass literacy, the Edwardian era, the First World War, the Second World War and the Blitz, the end of empire, the Sexual Revolution and the Swinging Sixties, and contemporary multicultural Britain. Read more about the HIST 269 course here.

Math Ph.D. Candidate Smith Delivers First Graduate Speaker Series Talk

Brett Smith, a Ph.D. candidate in mathematics, spoke during the first Graduate Speaker Series event Oct. 7 in Exley Science Center. Smith's talk, titled "Mine, Yours and the Truth," focused on American mobster Joe Massino, boss of the Bonanno crime family in New York from 1991 until 2004. "Big Joey" famously said, “there are three sides to every story — mine, yours and the truth.”

Brett Smith, a Ph.D. candidate in mathematics, spoke during the first Graduate Speaker Series event Oct. 7 in Exley Science Center. More than 50 students, faculty and staff attended the event. Smith’s talk, titled “Mine, Yours and the Truth,” focused on American mobster Joe Massino, boss of the Bonanno crime family in New York from 1991 until 2004. “Big Joey” famously said, “there are three sides to every story — mine, yours and the truth.”

By using a graph theory called the Robertson–Seymour theorem, Smith explored the competing questions, "What is the best way to organize a mafia so that you won't be caught?" and "What is the best way to patrol a city to disrupt organized crime?" Smith explained how these questions are one and the same.

By using a graph theory called the Robertson–Seymour theorem, Smith explored the competing questions, “What is the best way to organize a mafia so that you won’t be caught?” and “What is the best way to patrol a city to disrupt organized crime?”
Smith explained how these questions are one and the same.

Three more graduate students will tentatively speak as part of the series this fall and next spring including Duminda Ranasinghe, a chemistry Ph.D. candidate; Katie Kaus, a molecular biology and biochemistry Ph.D. candidate and Peter Blasser, a graduate student in music. For more information, visit the Graduate Studies website.

Students Prepare for Fall Harvest at Long Lane Farm

Wesleyan students at Long Lane Organic Farm are preparing for the annual Pumpkin Fest, hosted by the College of the Environment on Oct. 25. The event celebrates the annual fall harvest at the farm. This month, students are harvesting pumpkins, eggplant, tomatoes, lettuce, turnips, potatoes, squash, herbs and many more vegetables.

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The event celebrates the annual fall harvest at the farm. This month, students are harvesting pumpkins, eggplant, tomatoes, lettuce, turnips, potatoes, squash, herbs and many more vegetables.

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Long Lane Farm is an organic student-run farm that supplies high quality organic food to local residents of the Middletown area as well as to food pantries and soup kitchens. Pictured are student farmers working inside the humid hoop house on Oct. 3.

Chemistry, English Major Yoo ’15 Coordinates WesReads/WesMath Program, Korean Dance Group

Angela Yoo '15 is co-coordinator of the tutoring program, WesReads/WesMath, which allows Wesleyan students to tutor at two different local elementary schools. (Photo by Olivia Drake) 

Angela Yoo ’15 is co-coordinator of the tutoring program, WesReads/WesMath, which allows Wesleyan students to tutor at two different local elementary schools. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

Q: Angela, where are you from and why did you choose Wesleyan to further your education?

A: I am from Nanuet, New York but I went to a boarding school called Phillips Exeter Academy. I chose Wesleyan because I was intrigued by how people were given the freedom to pursue their interests, no matter how different these interests might be. I was also attracted by the collaborative atmosphere and how people seemed to encourage and support their peers.

Q: What are you majoring in?

A: I’m double majoring in chemistry and English, and I hope to write a thesis on non-beta lactam inhibitors of beta-lactamses. This entails synthesis of potential inhibitors as well as investigating the efficacy of these compounds through enzyme kinetics. I have been working in Professor Pratt’s lab in the Chemistry Department since sophomore spring. I chose to also pursue English because I was really interested exploring the different stories that people tell, the various ways in which they tell their stories and how we understand them.

Q: You’re currently the co-coordinator of a tutoring program called WesReads/WesMath. Tell us a bit about this program.

A: WesReads/WesMath allows Wesleyan students to tutor at two different local elementary schools. More than 70 Wesleyan students volunteer through the program and we help teachers with classroom activities or work with a small group of advanced learners on a math or reading curriculum that we developed or organized.

Tennis Star Chong ’18 Represents Hong Kong at the 17th Asian Games

Eudice Chong '18 hails from Sai Kung, Hong Kong.

Eudice Chong ’18 hails from Sai Kung, Hong Kong.

Eudice Chong ’18 has blossomed as the top player on Wesleyan’s women’s tennis team in her first season. Recently in action during a tournament at Conn. College (Oct. 5), she defeated Trinity’s #1 player and Amherst’s #2 player, both in straight sets.  Each opponent was a top-eight seed in the Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA) New England fall championship, which Eudice missed in September in order to traveled to South Korea for nearly two weeks to represent her native Hong Kong at the 17th Asian Games.  Here is a bit about Eudice and her experience:

Q: You just finished playing the the 17th Asian Games in South Korea, essentially the regional Olympics for some 45 nations. How would you describe the experience and nature of the competition?

A: The Asian Games was definitely one of the best experiences I’ve ever had, playing players ranked in the top 100 World Tennis Association (WTA) and getting to meet some people up close I’ve only seen on TV. Everyone in the tournament is very good — everyone was chosen to play in the Asian Games because they are the best in their country.

Q: In what events did you participate? How well did you do?

A: I played in the Team, Mixed Doubles and Women’s Doubles Events. During the Team Event, Hong Kong lost to China in the quarterfinals as my teammates and I lost to players all ranked in the top 200 WTA. In the Women’s Doubles Event, my partner and I won one round, but lost to a Thai pair which had a player who was ranked as high as 20 and another who is currently ranked top 200. Lastly, for the Mixed Doubles Event, my partner and I advanced to the round of 16, losing to a Taiwanese pair with the woman reaching the finals of Mixed Doubles in Wimbledon this year.

Q: You’ve been living in Hong Kong since you were about a year old. How wide-spread is the interest in tennis in the region and when did you figure out you were hooked on the sport?

A:  Well, I’d say tennis is more of a social game in Hong Kong. If you walk around the city, you’ll tend to see older adults playing

Grad Student Herman, Sultan Published in Evolution, Faculty 1000

Jacob Herman

Jacob Herman

Biology Ph.D. candidate Jacob Herman and Sonia Sultan, chair and professor of biology, professor of environmental studies, are the co-authors of an article titled “How stable ‘should’ epigenetic modifications be? Insights from adaptive plasticity and bet hedging,” published in Evolution, Issue 68(3), pages 632-43. Herman was the Private Investigator on the paper.

The article also was selected by Faculty 1000, a platform for life scientists that helps scientists to discover, discuss and publish research.

Sonia Sultan

Sonia Sultan

Epigenetics is the study of ways chemical reactions change the way an organism grows and develops, and the factors that influence them. Epigenetic modifications can be stable across the individual’s lifespan and in some species even persist across generations, or they can be reversible, but it is currently unclear how the persistence of epigenetic modifications may evolve. In this paper, Herman and Sultan provide insights from the theoretical advances in adaptive phenotypic plasticity to predict the conditions that would favor the evolution of stable versus reversible epigenetic modification as an adaptive environmental response both within and across generations.

At Wesleyan, Herman is interested in the evolutionary implications of developmental plasticity. In particular, he has been studying transgenerational plasticity, a phenomenon that occurs when environments experienced by parents (or even more remote generations) influence the phenotypes of offspring, without changing the DNA sequence.

“There is a growing body of research in both plants and animals that suggests that transgenerational plasticity can have important ecological and evolutionary impacts, including influences on response to selection and population persistence in stressful environments,” he said.

Polygonum persicaria

Polygonum persicaria

Herman’s doctoral research focused on adaptive seedling responses to grandparental and parental drought stress in the widespread, introduced plant Polygonum persicaria.

“We found that functionally appropriate responses to drought stress persist across at least two generations in this species. These adaptive effects enhanced the growth and survival of ‘grandchild’ seedling offspring grown in drought conditions,” he said.

Herman’s research is one part of the larger effort in the Sultan lab to understand how individual plants respond to key environmental stresses, such as drought, and how those responses influence species’ ecology and evolution.

Learn more about ongoing research in the Sultan Lab here.

Student A Capella Groups Perform during Family Weekend

The 4th Annual Stone A Cappella Concert at Memorial Chapel Sept. 28 featured the vocal talent of Wesleyan’s many student a capella groups. The event was part of Wesleyan’s Family Weekend. (Photos by Dat Vu ’15)

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Meet Wesleyan Tour Guide Greg Tavarez ’16

Greg Tavarez '16

Greg Tavarez ’16 is a Wesleyan tour guide and admission intern.

As part of an ongoing series on student employment, we speak to a campus tour guide. All Wesleyan tours are given by students, and the Office of Admission employs up to 50 student tour guides at a time.

According to Ashleigh Corvi ’13, assistant dean of admission and coordinator of the tour guide program, “The goal of our tours is to highlight the unique characteristics of Wesleyan, and interweave these ideas into a personal narrative. We want our tours to be a mix of facts and personal anecdotes and experiences. The stories our students recall are what resonate with visitors, especially the prospective students. This tour model, which we believe is effective, would not be possible without this student perspective.”

Tour guides are selected from a group interview setting in order to ensure they are comfortable presenting and answering questions in front of a group. According to Corvi, the Office of Admission

WESeminars, Concerts, Alumni Talks During Family Weekend Sept. 26-28

Diane LaPointe '79, P'17 of Bedford, N.Y. is attending Family Weekend with her daughter, Megan Dolan '17.

Diane LaPointe ’79, P’17 of Bedford, N.Y. is attending Family Weekend with her daughter, Megan Dolan ’17. “I loved coming back for my reunion, but this weekend, I get to be here as a parent, seeing campus through Megan’s eyes,” LaPointe said.

During Family Weekend, held Sept. 26-28, Wesleyan families are invited to attend classes and WESeminars, take in concerts and sporting events, enjoy meals, tour campus and learn about student programs and services.

Breaking from tradition, this year Family Weekend is be separate from Homecoming Weekend, because Homecoming occurs during Fall break.

On Sept. 25, Lisa and Scott Josephs of Chapel Hill, N.C. flew to Connecticut to attend Family Weekend with their son, Aaron '18. This is their fourth visit to campus.

On Sept. 25, Lisa and Scott Josephs of Chapel Hill, N.C. flew to Connecticut to attend Family Weekend with their son, Aaron ’18. This is their fourth visit to campus.

Diane LaPointe ’79, P’17, celebrated her 35th Wesleyan Reunion in May, and is elated to return to campus four months later to visit with her daughter, Megan Dolan ’17. Megan took her mother to a French class and Modern Dance III class, and the two plan on spending time mingling with Megan’s friends and fellow visiting parents.

Lisa and Scott Josephs of Chapel Hill, N.C. are attending Family Weekend with their son, Aaron ’18. “I’m taking them to my Hebrew class, and then I’m excited to introduce them to my friends, professors and advisor,” Aaron said.

Richard Lanet P’18 and Joan Williamson P’18 of Venice, Calif. are visiting their daughter, Ruby Lanet ’18. “This is my first time visiting Wesleyan, so I’m looking forward to taking a tour of this beautiful campus, going to a class and the comedy show tonight,” Richard Lanet said.

Catherine Lewis ’18 is enjoying the event with her mother, Christian Roberts P’18 and aunt Elsa Aminlewis, both from Bronx, N.Y. The trio is looking forward to walking around campus and enjoying a few meals together.

Catherine Lewis '18 is spending Family Weekend with her mother, Christian Roberts P'18 and aunt Elsa Aminlewis.

Catherine Lewis ’18 is spending Family Weekend with her mother, Christian Roberts P’18 and aunt Elsa Aminlewis.

“Mostly we’re just glad to be spending time together,” Catherine said.

Guests may register onsite during the weekend at Usdan University Center.

Check in hours are:
Friday, Sept. 26: 10 a.m.–9 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 27: 8 a.m.–7 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 28: 9 a.m.–2 p.m.

The schedule is open to all members of the Wesleyan family. Highlights include a South Indian vocal performance as part of the Navaratri Festival at the Center for the Arts; the 22nd annual Dwight L. Greene Symposium, featuring a movie screening and talkback with Bobbito “Kool Bob Love” Garcia ’88; student a capella concert; Friends of the Wesleyan Library book sale; tailgating; and WESeminars on a variety of topics including animal dignity and ethics of sight, writing at Wesleyan, and ending back pain.

On Sept. 27, Craig Thomas ’97 and Carter Bays ’97, creators and writer-producers of the popular television series How I Met Your Mother, will speak about their experiences at Wesleyan, their work in TV, and HIMYM.

The Family Weekend photo gallery on Flickr will be updated throughout the weekend. More family photos are below: (Photos by Olivia Drake)

Family Weekend at Wesleyan University, Sept. 26, 2014. (Photo by Olivia Drake) Family Weekend at Wesleyan University, Sept. 26, 2014. (Photo by Olivia Drake) Family Weekend at Wesleyan University, Sept. 26, 2014. (Photo by Olivia Drake) Family Weekend at Wesleyan University, Sept. 26, 2014. (Photo by Olivia Drake) Family Weekend at Wesleyan University, Sept. 26, 2014. (Photo by Olivia Drake)Family Weekend at Wesleyan University, Sept. 26, 2014. (Photo by Olivia Drake)