Tag Archive for COE

Students Present Academic Research at Poster Sessions

Hundreds of Wesleyan students had the opportunity to present their academic research at various poster sessions in March and April. Posters often contain text, graphics and images that illustrate the students’ research results on a single board. Poster session attendees can view the posters and interact with the author.

This year, the Psychology Department, College of the Environment, Biology Department, Neuroscience and Behavior Program, Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division, Quantitative Analysis Center and the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences hosted poster sessions.

Photos of the poster sessions are below: (Photos by Olivia Drake, Caroline Kravitz ’19 and Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19)

Kylie Moynihan ’17 presented “Testing the Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Model of Franks et al.." Her advisor is Dana Royer, chair and professor of earth and environmental sciences.

On April 21, Wesleyan’s Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division hosted a Celebration of Science Theses, a poster session featuring the work of Honors and MA students in the NSM fields. During the event, Kylie Moynihan ’17 presented her thesis research titled “Testing the Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Model of Franks et al..”

Psychology graduate student Lucy De Souza examined “Honor and Masculinity Among Latinos and European-Americans.” De Souza’s faculty advisor is Patricia Rodriguez Mosquera, associate professor of psychology.

On April 27, the Psychology Department hosted a poster session in Beckham Hall. Psychology graduate student Lucy De Souza presented her poster on “Honor and Masculinity Among Latinos and European-Americans.”

Baileys Support Groundbreaking Approach to Environmental Studies

On April 7, Menakka and Essel Bailey ’66 visited the College of Letters.

Essel Bailey ’66 and his wife, Menakka, visited the College of the Environment on April 7.

Essel Bailey ’66 believes that science is the foundation for addressing questions of environmental policy, which aptly describes the purpose of Wesleyan’s College of the Environment. Now, he and his wife, Menakka, have increased their support of the COE with a new $4 million commitment to its programs, faculty and students – bringing their total gift to the COE to $7.5 million.

In part, their endowment gift will fund a multi-pronged effort to extend the work and themes of the Menakka and Essel Bailey Think Tank throughout the campus, explained Barry Chernoff, chair of the COE and the Robert Schumann Professor of Environmental Studies. Chernoff is planning for seminars, workshops and faculty-student research grants as means for engaging the wider community in Think Tank themes, such as next year’s topic – Disruptions to Disasters: Confronting the Human-Environmental Relationship. The fund also supports a Distinguished Visiting Scholar, a position currently held by Professor Henry Adams of Case Western University.

“Wesleyan is committed to graduating informed citizens who will become involved in a broad range of environmental practices and policy-making,” said President Michael Roth ’78. “We are so grateful to Essel and Menakka for their sustained support of the College of the Environment and its curricular initiatives. They have helped the College achieve its mission with distinction.”

Farm Tours, Music, Crafts at Pumpkin Fest Oct. 8

The College of the Environment is hosting its annual Pumpkin Festival from noon to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 8.

Enjoy free veggie burgers, apple cider, farm tours, live music, vendors, activities and crafts, face painting, tie-dying, letterboxing, paper making, up-cycling t-shirts and more.

Pumpkins, apples and baked goods will be for sale.

The event is co-hosted by Long Lane Farm and Bon Appetit. The event is free and open to the public. Long Lane Farm is located at the corner of Long Lane and Wadsworth Street near campus. In the event of rain, the event will be rescheduled on Oct. 9.

Pumpkin Fest

COE Hosts Community Discussion on Middletown’s Future

On April 26, the College of the Environment hosted a discussion on “Middletown/Mattabesset and the Connecticut River: Past, Present and Future” in the Community Health Center in Middletown. Several Wesleyan staff and faculty attended, along with members of the Middletown community.

On April 26, the College of the Environment hosted a discussion on “Middletown/Mattabesset and the Connecticut River: Past, Present and Future” in the Community Health Center in Middletown. Several Wesleyan staff and faculty attended, along with members of the Middletown community.

Panelist Stephen Devoto, professor of biology, professor of neuroscience and behavior, is a community activist who is a member of the Middletown Planning and Zoning Commission.

Panelist Stephen Devoto, professor of biology, professor of neuroscience and behavior, is a community activist who is a member of the Middletown Planning and Zoning Commission.

The panelists shared short vision statements on Middletown’s past, present and future and discussed what will and should the Middletown/Mettabesset look like in 50 years. Panelists welcomed questions and comments from the audience.

The panelists shared short vision statements on Middletown’s past, present and future and discussed what will and should the Middletown/Mettabesset look like in 50 years. Panelists welcomed questions and comments from the audience.

William “Vijay” Pinch served as the moderator. Pinch is professor of history, chair and professor of environmental studies. William “Vijay” Pinch served as the moderator. Pinch is professor of history, chair and professor of environmental studies.

William “Vijay” Pinch served as the moderator. Pinch is professor of history, chair and professor of environmental studies.

Other panelists included John Hall, founder and director of the Jonah Center for Earth & Art in Middletown; Erik Hesselberg, president of the Middlesex County Historical Society; Lucianne Lavin, director of research and collections for the Institute for American Indian Studies in Washington, Conn.; and Meg Walker, vice president of Project for Public Spaces in New York, NY.

Other panelists included Meg Walker, vice president of Project for Public Spaces in New York; Erik Hesselberg, president of the Middlesex County Historical Society; Lucianne Lavin, director of research and collections for the Institute for American Indian Studies in Washington, Conn. and John Hall, founder and director of the Jonah Center for Earth & Art in Middletown.

Attendees continued their conversation at a reception following the event. (Photos by Richard Marinelli)

Attendees continued their conversation at a reception following the event. (Photos by Richard Marinelli)

Students Celebrate Fall with Pumpkin Fest, Long Lane Farm Harvest

Students celebrated fall at the annual Pumpkin Fest Oct. 17.

Students celebrated fall at the annual Pumpkin Fest Oct. 17.

Several students are celebrating the fall season at Wesleyan’s Long Lane Farm. Farm interns are still harvesting pumpkins, peppers, beets, tomatoes, fresh flowers, thyme and other herbs this October. The student-run organic farm is devoted to allowing students a place to experiment and learn about sustainable agriculture. Long Lane students also seek to foster good relationships with local farmers.

On Oct. 17, the College of the Environment hosted its annual Pumpkin Fest at the farm. Participants received farm tours, free veggie burgers, craft opportunities, face paintings and live music performances. Pumpkins, along with other produce, were sold at the festival.

View photos of Pumpkin Fest and the farm below: (Photos by Olivia Drake, Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19 and Will Barr ’18)

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Long Lane Farm at Wesleyan University, Oct. 8, 2015.

Pumpkins, Peppers Harvested at Long Lane Farm

Pumpkins, peppers, beets, tomatoes and thyme are still growing at Wesleyan’s Long Lane Farm this October. The student-run organic farm is devoted to allowing students a place to experiment and learn about sustainable agriculture. In addition to weekly meetings, students run work days every Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Long Lane students also seek to foster good relationships with local farmers.

The College of the Environment will host its annual Pumpkin Fest from noon to 4 p.m. Oct. 17 at the farm. For more information see this flyer.

Photos of the farm on Oct. 8 and 10 are below: (Photos by Olivia Drake and Will Barr ’18)

Long Lane Farm at Wesleyan University, Oct. 8, 2015.

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Students Study Kangaroo Behavior in Response to Environmental Changes

Angus McLean and Mariel Becker collecting kangaroo droppings in Boundary Road Reserve. (Photo courtesy of the Bathurst Kangaroo Project)

Angus McLean and Mariel Becker collecting kangaroo droppings in Boundary Road Reserve. (Photo courtesy of the Bathurst Kangaroo Project)

Two Wesleyan students and a former visiting professor have just wrapped up a seven-week-long research project on kangaroo behavior in Bathurst, Australia. Working with Liv Baker, an animal studies postdoctoral fellow in the College of the Environment in 2014-15, Angus McLean ’16 and Mariel Becker ’18 have collected “more than 600 pages of data recording kangaroo behavior in response to daily changes and threats in their environment,” according to an article in Western Advocate.

“There were noticeable differences in behaviour between the kangaroos we observed out of town, and between the three different mobs around the Mount,” McLean told the paper.

Angus MacLean observes a kangaroo at one of their sites. At this site, kangaroos were extremely habituated to humans.

Angus McLean observes a kangaroo at one of their sites. At this site, kangaroos were extremely habituated to humans.

“We’ve also collected a freezer full of kangaroo droppings being stored at Charles Sturt University, and which University of Technology Sydney will be testing for cortisol levels, which indicate stress. Our supervisor Dr. Liv Baker from Wesleyan University will be analysing both sets of data and writing up a paper about how Mount Panorama kangaroos are responding to stressors in their environment.”

The project began in June, when Baker held a workshop at the Bathurst Art Gallery collating descriptions of kangaroo behaviors to inform the students’ character-state recognition records.

Mariel Becker collected fecal samples, which were sent to a lab in Sydney. The samples are analyzed for cortisol levels, which is a hormone produced when the animal is stressed.

Mariel Becker collected fecal samples, which were sent to a lab in Sydney. The samples are analyzed for cortisol levels, which is a hormone produced when the animal is stressed.

Environmental Studies Class Presents Artist’s Books, Projects

Students enrolled in the Introduction to Environmental Studies course presented their artist’s books, children’s stories, documentaries and story maps during the class’s annual Project Showcase on May 14 in Exley Science Center. The class is taught by Kim Diver, visiting assistant professor of earth and environmental sciences. Suzy Taraba, director of Wesleyan’s Special Collections and Archives attended the event and spoke to the students about artist books.

Photos of the event are below: (Photos by Aviva Hirsch)

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Tucker to Study Victorian Sustainability, River Pollution Prevention Reform as Visiting Fellow

Jennifer Tucker

Jennifer Tucker is associate professor of history; associate professor of environmental studies; associate professor of feminist, gender, and sexuality studies; associate professor of science in society and faculty fellow in the College of the Environment.

As a 2015 Humanities Research Centre Visiting Fellow, Associate Professor Jennifer Tucker will study Victorian sustainability, photography, law and river pollution prevention reform at Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra, Australia.

Her appointment will be May 15-July 15.

Tucker’s ongoing research, tentatively titled “Science Against Industry: Photographic Technologies and the Visual Politics of Pollution Reform,” traces the historical roots of the use of visual evidence in environmental science and pollution reform. Using nearly 300 visual representations (drawings, engravings photographs, and graphs) from archives and libraries, many of which have never previously been studied, she analyzes the scientific impact of new forms of visual representation in chemical climatology and examines the presentation and use of specific visual exhibits in Victorian courtroom debates over air and river pollution.

The research addresses current questions that lie at the heart of several fields and disciplines, including environmental history,

New Environmental Film Series to be Presented by COE, CFA

Beginning this month, Wesleyan’s College of the Environment, Center for the Arts and other outside partners will present “The Elements: An Annual Environmental Film Series.”

The first film, Elemental, will be screened at 7:30 p.m. March 30 in the Center for the Arts Hall. The award-winning film follows three activists as they work to protect air, water and earth around the world, and offers a call for global action.

The second film in the series, WATERSHEDwill be screened at 7 p.m. May 4 in Middlesex Community College’s Chapman Hall, 100 Training Hill Rd. in Middletown. Executive produced and narrated by Robert Redford, this film tells the story of threats to the “once-mighty Colorado River, now dammed and diverted and struggling to support 30 million people.” The film offers solutions for “meeting the competing interests of cities, agriculture, industry, recreation, wildlife, and indigenous communities with rights to the waters, and the future of the American West.”

Admission to the screenings is free. For more information about the film series, call 860-685-3733. More information is available on the College of the Environment’s website.

The series is presented in partnership with The Connecticut River Coastal Conservation District, Middlesex Community College Environmental Science Program and The Rockfall Foundation.