Tag Archive for arts

Art Work by Harrison ’89 at Bard College

Artwork by Rachel Harrison '89 is on display in New York City.

Large-scale installations by Rachel Harrison '89 are on exhibit at Bard College.

Now through Dec. 20, the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College (CCS Bard) in Annandale-on-Hudson, N.Y. presents Consider the Lobster, the first major survey of New York-based artist Rachel Harrison ’89. Named after an essay by the late David Foster Wallace, this exhibition encompasses more than 10 years of large-scale installations by Harrison, all of which will be reconfigured for the CCS Bard galleries, as well as a number of the autonomous sculptural and photographic works for which she is best known.

In addition to Rachel Harrison’s work in the CCS Bard Galleries, six artists, including Nayland Blake, Tom Burr, Harry Dodge, Alix Lambert, Allen Ruppersberg and Andrea Zittel, have collaborated with Harrison to re-install works from the Marieluise Hessel Collection.

In a recent review of the exhibition in The New York Times, Holland Cotter wrote: “Ms. Harrison … is often called a sculptor, which is accurate. But she is also, and simultaneously, a painter, photographer, video maker, collagist and installation artist. She has the databank brain of a historian, the magpie instincts of a collector and a curator’s exacting eye. Her work is figurative and abstract, casually piled on and highly deliberated, zany and chilly. ”

Consider the Lobster is a collaboration with the Whitechapel Gallery in London, where the exhibition will be on view from April 27 through June 20, 2010.
For more information, visit http://www.bard.edu/ccs/ or call 845-758-7598.

Connecticut Gallery Features Sculptures by Stern ’80

Recent sculptures by Melissa Stern ’80 will be shown with work by four other artists at the Bachelier Cardonsky Gallery Open House in Kent, Conn. from May 23 through July 5. The opening is from 4 to 6 p.m. on May 23.

Stern’s work reflects both non-Western and outsider art influences. Her drawings, collages, and figurative sculptures are characterized by their richly drawn and deeply layered surfaces. She uses a wide range of materials from encaustic to clay, pastel to steel.

“All of my pieces share a thematic thread,” Stern says. “Childlike and goofy my figures live in a dream world, cower in relationships or stand tall in the face of adversity. They are at once dark and funny, expressive of the absurd world around them. Gender, relationships and broader social dynamics are subtly intertwined. The personal is the political.”

Stern, of New York, N.Y., considers herself a handyman cobbling together drawings and sculptures from elements found, borrowed and imagined.

The Bachelier Cardonsky Gallery is open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday and by appointment. For more information call 860-927-3129. Its address is 10 North Main Street.

Global Warning Exhibit Explores Climate Change through Visual Art

Artists and Climate Change, during an opening night reception May 1.

Nina Felshin, curator of exhibitions at the Ezra and Cecile Gallery, introduces the exhibit, "Global Warning: Artists and Climate Change," during an opening night reception May 1. The purpose of "Global Warning" is to increase awareness of climate change through challenging content that is laced with poetry and aesthetic power. Included in the show are works in a variety of media from the past three decades by Included in the exhibition are works by Marion Belanger, Nancy Cohen, Lenore Malen, Eve Mosher, Katie Shelly, Frances Whitehead, and students from Wesleyan's Architecture Research-Design-Build Studio taught by Elijah Huge.

Lenore Malen and The New Society for Universal Harmony presented a mixed medium sculptural installation titled "Harmony as a Hive" and two video projections titled "The Dance Language of the Bees" and "I Am the Animal." "Harmony as a Hive" explores the ancient relationship of bees to human society in view of recent threats to the world’s bee population by globalization and climate change. The videos touch on the relationship of the honeybee to our terrestrial ecosystem.

Lenore Malen and The New Society for Universal Harmony presented a mixed medium sculptural installation titled "Harmony as a Hive" and two video projections titled "The Dance Language of the Bees" and "I Am the Animal." "Harmony as a Hive" explores the ancient relationship of bees to human society in view of recent threats to the world’s bee population by globalization and climate change. The videos touch on the relationship of the honeybee to our terrestrial ecosystem.

Moods and Modes," designed with handmade paper and wire. It represents the vast quiet landscape of the Mullica River and the Great Bay Estuary and the fragility of life.

Artist Nancy Cohen presented her lyrical sculptural installation, "Estuary: Moods and Modes," designed with handmade paper and wire. It represents the vast quiet landscape of the Mullica River and the Great Bay Estuary and the fragility of life.

Katie Shelly '09 spoke about her work titled "Bottled," made of glass perfume bottles. Found in a dumpster behind a New Jersey cosmetics plant, these tiny perfume bottles are placed out of order and out of context, invading the gallery space.

Katie Shelly '09 spoke about her work titled "Bottled," made of glass perfume bottles. Found in a dumpster behind a New Jersey cosmetics plant, these tiny perfume bottles "are placed out of order and out of context, invading the gallery space." (Photos by Alexandra Portis '09)

Press Printer, Book Artist Speaks With Art Classes

Amos Paul Kennedy, Jr. spoke about his career as a press printer and book artist April 21 in the Center for the Arts Cinema.

Amos Paul Kennedy, Jr. spoke about his career as a press printer and book artist April 21 in the Center for the Arts Cinema.

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Kennedy spoke to students in Professor of Art David Schorr’s classes. Schorr is pictured at left.
While on campus, Kennedy also had a screening of "Proceed and Be Bold!" a new documentary about Kennedy that includes interviews with Gina Ulysse, associate profesor of anthropology, associate professor of African American studies. His visit was sponsored in part by the Friends of Wesleyan Library. (Photos by Alexandra Portis '09)

While on campus, Kennedy also had a screening of "Proceed and Be Bold!" a new documentary about Kennedy that includes interviews with Gina Ulysse, associate profesor of anthropology, associate professor of African American studies. His visit was sponsored in part by the Friends of Wesleyan Library. (Photos by Alexandra Portis '09)

Wesleyan Participates in Mural Project with Local Youth

Green Street Arts Center students are working on designs for the community mural. (Photo courtesy of Marela Zacarias)

Green Street Arts Center students are working on designs for the community mural. (Photo courtesy of Marela Zacarias)

The Green Street Arts Center is launching the Green Street Community Mural Project, an 18 month-long art program that will culminate in a large public mural, to be installed in the spring of 2009 on the corner of Main and Green Streets in the North End of Middletown.

Led by mural artist Marela Zacarias, the project’s participants are a diverse group of Middletown children, their families, professional artists, Wesleyan students, and other community members. A core group of students in Green Street’s Afterschool Program will work with the artists on the project regularly.

The primary goal of the Green Street Community Mural Project will be obvious to every driver and pedestrian who passes Green Street.

“This mural will brighten Main Street with the colorful art of our students,” says Zacarias. “It will also help to raise awareness of the wonderful activities that the Green Arts Center offers for the Middletown community.”

The Green Street Community Mural Project is funded by a $10,000 grant

Krafft ’09 Speaks on Iraq Experiences at N.Y. Museum

Max Krafft '09 overlooks the city of An Nasiriyah, Iraq during a deployment with the U.S. Army. Krafft will speak about his experience March 7 and 22 as part of an upcoming art show at the New Museum in New York City. Krafft says the image "portrays visually the daunting task of talking about something so large and confusing from one person's perspective."

Max Krafft '09 overlooks the city of An Nasiriyah, Iraq during a deployment with the U.S. Army. Krafft will speak about his experience March 7 and 22 as part of an upcoming installation at the New Museum in New York City. Krafft says the image "portrays visually the daunting task of talking about something so large and confusing from one person's perspective."

As a former U.S. Army sergeant, Max Krafft ’09 has a lot to say about his two stints serving in Iraq.

The English major was deployed in December 2005, and again in January 2007. On both occasions he was touring as the bass player and sound engineer for a rock/pop/country/R&B ensemble affiliated with the 389th Army Band.

“We were there to perform for the members of the military and government contractors who were stationed there during the holidays in an attempt to entertain them and boost their morale,” Krafft explains, regarding his role overseas.

Krafft, who lived and worked within 300 meters of a car bomb explosion and several mortar attacks, will share his thoughts on the War in Iraq as part of an exhibit at the New Museum in New York. The part-installation, part-conversation show

Paoletti to Retire After Nearly 4 Decades at Wesleyan

John Paoletti, the Kenan Professor of the Humanities, professor of art history, will retire from Wesleyan in May.

John Paoletti, the Kenan Professor of the Humanities, professor of art history, will retire from Wesleyan in May. (Photo by Olivia Bartlett)

For 37 years, John Paoletti has explored the ideas and histories that produced both well-known and not so well-known works of Renaissance and modern art with thousands of Wesleyan students.

This May, Paoletti will retire from Wesleyan’s Art and Art History Department, ending a longtime career of teaching artists such as Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol, Donatello, and Michelangelo as well as the patronage of the Medici family.

“I will really miss working with the Wesleyan students and faculty colleagues across the curriculum,” Paoletti says from his office in the Davison Art Center. “Both have always been keenly critical of the issues at hand and have asked tough questions aimed at arriving at clearer understanding of whatever matter was being discussed.”

Paoletti joined Wesleyan in 1972 as an associate professor of art history. At the time, he was one of two art historians on campus;

Student Art Calls Attention to Race, Class Elitism

Several Wesleyan students of color are hosting an art show Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery South through the end of Feburary. Pictured is a photograpy collage titled "En Kolkata" created by Priya Ghosh '09.

An exhibit titled "Be the Art: You Want to See in the World" is on display in the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery, South Gallery through Feb. 15. The show will be transferred to Usdan University Center thereafter. Pictured is a collage of photographs titled "En Kolkata" created by Priya Ghosh '09.

Exhibit Examines Post-Soviet Russia through Photography, Video

Sasha Rudensky, <i>Bus Station</i>, Sevastopol, Ukraine, 2004, chromogenic print.

Sasha Rudensky's "Bus Station," Sevastopol, Ukraine, 2004, chromogenic print.

In her first major solo exhibition, visiting professor of art Sasha Rudensky ’01, will present two photographic series at Wesleyan University’s Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery: “Remains” (2004/08) and “Demons” (2007–08).

In “Remains,” Rudensky, who was born in Moscow in 1979 and moved to the United States in 1990, explores the political and social transformation of the former Soviet Union by poignantly focusing on the intimate details of everyday life. “Demons,” a series of hybrid portraits, suggests a fantastical version of the artist’s childhood.

Rudensky “Remains” in the fall of 2004 after receiving a Mortimer Hays Brandeis traveling fellowship. Her images, however, turned out to be very different than what she first intended to photograph.

“My proposal was to document mining towns in Siberia and the arctic north,” Rudensky says. “But having gotten there and after doing some preliminary shooting, I realized I didn’t want to simply document post-soviet devastation of depressed towns,

Sharp ’85, Miranda ’02, Weiner ’03 Involved in Arts and Culture

Book by Carolyn Sharp '85.

Sharp ’85 Finds Irony in Hebrew Scriptures
In her fascinating new study, Irony and Meaning in the Hebrew Bible (Indiana University Press), Carolyn J. Sharp ’85, associate professor of Hebrew Scriptures at Yale Divinity School, suggests that many stories in the Hebrew Scriptures may be ironically intended. By interweaving literary theory and exegesis, she examines the power of the unspoken in a wide variety of texts from the Pentateuch, the Prophets, and the Writings. Her book considers such themes as foreign rulers and the fear of God, the prostitute as icon of the ironic gaze, indeterminacy and dramatic irony in prophetic performance, and irony in ancient Israel’s wisdom traditions.

Sharp pays special attention to how irony can challenge the dominant ways in which the Bible is read today, especially when it touches on questions of conflict, gender, and the other.

Sharp’s research continues to explore the composition, redaction, and rhetoric of Hebrew Scripture texts. She is also the author of Prophecy and Ideology in Jeremiah: Struggles for Authority in the Deutero-Jeremianic Prose; and Old Testament Prophets for Today.

Holiday Print Sale Benefits Davison Art Center

uffin O'Dench, former curator; Claire Rogan, title, and Jean Shaw, title, browse artwork for sale during the Friends of the Davison Art Center Holiday Print Sale Dec. 4.

Ellen D'Oench, curator emerita; Claire Rogan, curator of the Davison Art Center, and Jean Shaw P'79, browse artwork for sale during the Friends of the Davison Art Center Holiday Print Sale Dec. 4. A percentage of each sale helped fund acquisitions for the Davison Art Center collection.