Tag Archive for biochemistry

Students Accepted into Molecular Biology Honor Society

Three Wesleyan students were accepted into the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Honor Society.
The students are Lee Gottesdiener ’12, Sophia Levan ’12 and Alejandra Olvera ’12.

These outstanding students have been selected based on their academic achievements, their commitment to research and science outreach.

The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) is a nonprofit scientific and educational organization with more than 12,000 members. Founded in 1906, the Society is based in Rockville, M.D. The Society’s purpose is to advance the science of biochemistry and molecular biology through publication of scientific and educational journals: the Journal of Biological ChemistryMolecular & Cellular Proteomics,  and the Journal of Lipid Research, organization of scientific meetings, advocacy for funding of basic research and education, support of science education at all levels, and promoting the diversity of individuals entering the scientific workforce.

Hingorani Group Publishes 8 Papers on DNA Mismatch Repair

A research group led by Manju Hingorani, associate professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, has published eight papers in 2011-2012 on the mechanisms of DNA replication and repair proteins, independently and in collaboration with research groups at Wesleyan and other national and international universities.

The papers are:

“Large conformational changes in MutS during DNA scanning, mismatch recognition and repair signaling,” published in The EMBO Journal, 2012 (in press).

The Variable Sub-domain of Escherichia coli SecA functions to regulate in the SecA ATPase Activity and ADP release,” published in the Journal of Bacteriology, 2012 (March 2 Epub). Don Oliver, the Daniel Ayres Professor of Biology, professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, was the lead investigator and Fred Cohan, professor of biology, professor of environmental studies, was a co-author on this paper.

Single-molecule multiparameter fluorescence spectroscopy reveals directional MutS binding to mismatched bases in DNA,” published in Nucleic Acids Research, 2012 (Feb, 24 Epub).

Biochemical analysis of the human mismatch repair proteins hMutSαMSH2G674A-MSH6 and MSH2-MSH6T1219D,” published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, 2012 (Jan. 25 Epub).

ATP Binding and Hydrolysis-Driven Rate-Determining Events in the RFC-Catalyzed PCNA Clamp Loading Reaction,” published in the Journal of Molecular Biology, Feb. 17, 2012; 416(2), pages 176-91.

A Central Swivel Point in the RFC Clamp Loader Controls PCNA Opening and Loading on DNA,” published in the Journal of Molecular Biology, Feb. 17, 2012; 416(2), pages 163-75.

Human MSH2 (hMSH2) protein controls ATP processing by hMSH2-hMSH6,” published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Nov. 18, 2011; 286(46), pages 40287-95.

Dynamical allosterism in the mechanism of action of DNA mismatch repair protein MutS,” published in the Biophysical Journal, Oct. 5, 2011;101(7), pages 1730-9. David Beveridge, the Joshua Boger Professor of the Sciences and Mathematics, was the lead investigator on this paper.

“Drug Design” Topic of Sept. 22 Biophysics and Biological Chemistry Retreat

Christina Othon, assistant professor of physics, will speak on "Phase Transitions in Biological Membranes" during the Molecular Biophysics and Biological Chemistry Retreat.

“Drug Design from Transition State Analysis” will be the central topic of the 12th annual Molecular Biophysics and Biological Chemistry Retreat Sept. 22. The public is invited to the retreat, which will be held at Wadsworth Mansion in Middletown.

Faculty from chemistry, physics and biology will present lectures.

Mukerji’s Study on Protein Binding Published in Biochemistry

Ishita Mukerji, professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, director of graduate studies, is the co-author of ““HU Binding to a DNA Four-Way Junction Probed by Förster Resonance Energy Transfer,” published in Biochemistry, issue 50, pages 1432–1441, 2011. This work specifically examines the Escherichia coli protein HU’s four-way junction interaction using fluorescence spectroscopic methods.

This work was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation and the Patrick and Catherine Weldon Donaghue Medical Research Foundation.

Toxin Study by Olson, De Published in PNAS

In a newly published paper, Rich Olson, assistant professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, describes studies of a toxin produced by the bacterium that causes cholera.

The paper –“Crystal structure of the Vibrio cholerae cytolysin heptamer reveals common features among disparate pore-forming toxins” – is the culmination of nearly eight years work. Co-authored with Swastik De, a graduate student in Olson’s lab, the paper has been published online by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) and will appear in a print edition later this spring.

Olson’s lab studies the molecular details of how pathogens invade human hosts.  Bacteria produce toxins to protect themselves from hosts’ immune systems and to scavenge materials necessary for colonization. Understanding how toxins affect host cells could lead to better treatments in some cases.

 

Mukerji Awarded REU Grant for Holliday Junctions Research

Ishita Mukerji, professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, and dean of the Natural Sciences and Mathematics division, received a grant for $6,750 from the National Sciences Foundation. The grant is part of the National Science Foundation’s Research Experiences for Undergraduates, which provides funding for faculty to work with an undergraduate student. The award is supporting research on “Structure and Function of Holliday Junctions Complexed with Proteins Probed by Flourescence and UV Raman Spectroscopic Methods.”

Maureen Snow: Assisting MB&B, Hughes Program with Accounts

Maureen Snow is an accounting specialist for the Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Department, and administrative assistant for the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Program in the Life Sciences.


Q: Maureen, you are an accounting specialist for the Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Department, and an administrative assistant for the Wesleyan Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Program in the Life Sciences. Is it challenging to wear two hats?

A: Maybe it should be more of a challenge, but I’ve been doing it so long it’s become second nature. I akin it to speaking two languages, your brain just shifts automatically from one to the other. Michael Weir (director of the Hughes Program)  in one door to talk summer applications and Mike McAlear (chair of the Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Department) walks in the other door to talk department budget. Sometimes it’s difficult to devote the appropriate number o

McAlear, Arnone Published in Eukaryotic Cell

Michael McAlear, chair and associate professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, and James Arnone, a Ph.D candidate in his lab, have published “Adjacent Gene Pairing Plays a Role in the Coordinated Expression of Ribosome Biogenesis Genes MPP10 and YJR003C in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae” a paper that shows that the physical position of genes on chromosomes — immediately adjacent gene pairs in particular — plays an important role in how they are turned on and off.

These findings were first discovered in yeast cells, but also hold true over a wide range of life forms, from worms to fruit flies to humans. A deeper understanding of how cells organize and manifest their genetic material is critical for future efforts to develop therapeutic treatments for disorders related to defects in gene regulation.

“Adjacent Gene Pairing Plays a Role in the Coordinated Expression of Ribosome Biogenesis Genes MPP10 and YJR003C in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae” appears in the January 2011 issue of Eukaryotic Cell.

The paper is the product of experiments performed at Wesleyan.

Hingorani, Bricca Explain Science Documentary Filmmaking Class in ASBMB Today

Stephen Devoto, associate professor of biology, associate professor of neuroscience and behavior, is featured in a video created by a student enrolled in the course, Making the Science Documentary.

Manju Hingorani, associate professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, and Jacob Bricca, adjunct assistant professor of film studies, explained their experimental cross-disciplinary course on science documentary filmmaking at Wesleyan in a December 2010 article published in American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) Today.

In the article, Hingorani and Bricca wrote about their course, “Making the Science Documentary,” which they co-taught together, starting in 2007. The course was designed to introduce undergraduate students to the life sciences and to documentary filmmaking

Hingorani Awarded Grants from State, NIH, NSF

Manju Hingorani

Manju Hingorani, associate professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, received a $165,083 grant from the Connecticut Department of Health for her study titled “Role of DNA Mismatch Repair in Tobacco Smoke-Mediated Carcinogenesis.” The grant will fund a post-doc and research associate’s projects through September 2012.

Also, Hingorani, received a $497,532 grant from the National Institutes of Health for her study titled “PCNA Clamp Mechanisms in DNA Replication and Repair.” The grant will fund graduate and undergraduate students’ research projects through June 2013. The project is supported by Award number R15GM094047 from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences.

Also, Hingorani received a $765,141 grant from the National Science Foundation for her study titled “Kinetic Mechanisms of DNA Mismatch Repair Proteins.” The grant will fund a post-doc and graduate and undergraduate students’ research projects through September 2014. The project is supported by Award number MCB-1022203 from the Division of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences.