Tag Archive for Center for the Arts

Wesleyan Hosts “Combat Paper” Exhibit, Workshop with Iraq War Veteran

Combat Paper demonstrates the traditional craft of handmade paper, which uses plant-based clothing as the source material to be rendered into a pulp and finally into sheets of paper. This practice goes back many centuries and enables veterans to interpret and commemorate aspects of military service by transforming the uniforms from those experiences into paper.

Combat Paper demonstrates the traditional craft of handmade paper, which uses plant-based clothing as the source material to be rendered into a pulp and finally into sheets of paper. This practice goes back many centuries and enables veterans to interpret and commemorate aspects of military service by transforming the uniforms from those experiences into paper.

On Sept. 25-28, Wesleyan will welcome Iraq War Veteran Drew Cameron to campus to share the story of Combat Paper, the practice of hand papermaking, and how this collaborative project has become an integral part of the emerging veteran artist movement. Cameron is the co-founder of Combat Paper, a project in which veterans and the non-veteran community use traditional hand papermaking techniques to transform military uniforms into paper, prints, books, and art.

“All of our experiences are encoded within the material items we carry about. With clothing, and military uniforms, our personal geographies, memories, and accomplishments are carried in the woven threads,” he said. “Through the hand papermaking process, the clothing is deconstructed, transformed, and altered into paper sheets that accentuate those individual and collective stories.”

From Sept. 25-28, the exhibit case in Usdan University Center will feature “New Works by Drew Cameron of Combat Paper.”

From 1 to 3 p.m. Sept. 26, Cameron will lead an interactive demonstration of some steps of the papermaking process on Andrus Field, including “breaking rag” using donated military uniforms and the portable paper mill. The demonstration is open to the public and is being held in conjunction with Middletown Day, which has the theme “Salute to Service, Honoring Our Veterans.” Cameron will lead another interactive workshop from 4 to 7 p.m. in Usdan Room 108 and encourages Wesleyan students and Posse Veteran Scholars to attend.

Drew Cameron

Drew Cameron

At 4:15 p.m. Sept. 28, Cameron will deliver an artist’s talk on “The Combat Paper Project” in Usdan 108. The talk is open to the public.

The Combat Paper project is co-sponsored by Wesleyan’s Department of Art and Art History, Office of Equity and Inclusion, Friends of the Wesleyan Library, and Center for the Arts.

Student Music Scene Celebrated at the 4th Annual MASH

On Sept. 11, the Center for the Arts celebrated the student music scene at The MASH. Inspired by Fete de la Musique, also known as World Music Day, this fourth annual festival highlights Wesleyan’s student musicians. The event took place inside Usdan University Center, Patricelli ’92 Theater and Crowell Concert Hall.

More than 15 bands performed including Locus, described as “one man with psychedelic textures and experimental beats;” Mom, a funky band full of post-pubescent mystery rock; Quasimodal, Wesleyan’s oldest co-ed A cappella group; Veeblefetzer, Wesleyan’s finest Klezmer ensemble; Lo-Qi, a rap duo “here to denounce corporate oppression;” Sleep Kid, a sea-punk group of musicians and magicians; Slavei, a group inspired by music of Europe, the Balkans, and Caucasus Georgia; and Sloopy Coos Canyon, who performs “pretty happy stuff about sometimes sad things,” among others.

Photos of The MASH are below and in this Wesleyan University Facebook set. (Photos by Will Barr ’18, Ryan Heffernan ’16, Hannah Norman ’16 and Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19)

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The Mash, “Bach to School” Kick Off CFA’s New Season

The Mash will kick off the 2015-16 Center for the Arts series on Setp. 11. Inspired by Fete de la Musique, also known as World Music Day, the fourth annual festival highlights Wesleyan's student music scene.

The Mash will kick off the 2015-16 Center for the Arts series on Sept. 11. Inspired by Fete de la Musique, also known as World Music Day, the fourth annual festival highlights Wesleyan’s student music scene.

Wesleyan’s Center for the Arts 2015-16 season includes two world premieres, one United States premiere, one New England premiere, four Connecticut debuts and the following events:

Artist in Residence and University Organist Ronald Ebrecht will perform "Bach to School" at 8:30 p.m. Sept. 11 in Memorial Chapel. The concert will feature a lively recital of works by Johann Sebastian Bach, César Franck, Charles-Marie Widor, and John Spencer Camp Professor of Music Neely Bruce. (photo by Sandy Aldieri)

Artist in Residence and University Organist Ronald Ebrecht will perform “Bach to School” at 8:30 p.m. Sept. 11 in Memorial Chapel. The concert will feature a lively recital of works by Johann Sebastian Bach, César Franck, Charles-Marie Widor, and John Spencer Camp Professor of Music Neely Bruce. (photo by Sandy Aldieri)

• Sept. 11: The Mash at Olin Library, North College, Center for the Arts and Foss Hill.
• Sept. 11: “Bach to School” at the Memorial Chapel with Artist in Residence and University Organist Ronald Ebrecht
• Sept. 13: Music at The Russell House: Julie Ribchinsky Bach and the Modern World
• Sept. 16-Dec. 13: “R. Luke Dubois—In Real Time” exhibition in Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery
• Sept. 17-Nov. 7: Eiko Otake — “A Body in Places”
• Sept. 18: Nicholas Payton Trio featuring Gerald Cannon and Herlin Riley
• Sept. 24: “Theater After Wesleyan” panel discussion
• Sept. 25-26: Connecticut debut of Dorrance Dance
• Sept. 28: The Combat Paper Project
• Oct. 7-11: 39th annual Navaratri Festival
• Oct. 9: Daniel Beaty performing “Mr. Joy”

Tatge Joins Board of the New England Foundation for the Arts

Pam Tatge

Pam Tatge

Pam Tatge ’84, MALS ’10, P’16, director of Wesleyan’s Center for the Arts (CFA), was appointed to the board of the New England Foundation for the Arts (NEFA).

Noted for facilitating Liz Lerman’s “Ferocious Beauty: Genome” at the CFA, an exploration of repercussions of genetic research in 2006, Tatge received the 2010 William Dawson Award from the Association of Performing Arts Presenters, given to an individual or organization in the presenting field for sustained leadership, innovation and vision in program design, audience building and community involvement efforts.

Additionally, Tatge worked closely with former NEFA executive director Sam Miller ’75 to create Wesleyan’s Institute for Curatorial Practice and Performance, which offers an MA in performance curation. As a Wesleyan undergraduate, she majored in history.

“NEFA is an extraordinary institution with innovative programs that successfully marry artists to audiences in New England and across our nation,” Tatge says. “I’m honored to serve on their board.”

ICPP Receives $100K Doris Duke Grant

Wesleyan's Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance (ICPP) has received a $100K grant from the Doris Duke Foundation.

Wesleyan’s Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance (ICPP) has received a $100K grant from the Doris Duke Foundation.

Wesleyan’s Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance (ICPP) has been awarded a four-year, $100,000 grant from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation to support the participation of low-income students and students of color in ICPP’s master’s and certificate programs through the ICPP Scholarship Fund.

Founded in 2010 and housed at Wesleyan’s Center for the Arts, ICPP is a center for the academic study of the presentation and contextualization of contemporary performance, and offers an interdisciplinary, graduate-level education in innovative and relevant curatorial approaches to developing and presenting time-based art. Starting in July 2015, the institute will offer a master’s degree in performance curation. ICPP’s ten-month, post-graduate certificate program is now in its fourth year.

“We are extremely grateful for the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation’s critical support for the Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance’s expanded offerings,” said ICPP Director Samuel A. Miller ’75. “These funds will allow us to significantly enhance access to both our master’s and certificate programs.”

Indonesian Dancers Perform, Lead Workshop with Green Street TLC Students

Tari Aceh! performers worked with students at the Green Street Arts Center Feb. 25.

Tari Aceh! performers worked with students at the Green Street Teaching and Learning Center Feb. 25.

On Feb. 5, the Green Street Teaching and Learning Center hosted dancers from the Connecticut premier of Tari Aceh! (Dance Aceh!). The performance features a group of nine female performers from Aceh, Indonesia on their first-ever tour of the United States. Their dances, inherited from their ancestors, are stunning in their synchronicity and include rhythmic body percussion and the singing of both Islamic liturgical and folk texts, accompanied by percussion. The dancers are between the ages of 14 and 24, and study at Syiah Kuala University, located in Banda Aceh, the capital of the Aceh province on the western Indonesian island of Sumatra.

Green Street held a workshop with the Acehnese dancers for its AfterSchool students. The workshop exposed them to a similar dance from another culture. Afterwards, the Green Street TLC Hip Hop students taught the Indonesian dancers their own dance routine.

A supporter of Green Street TLC, the Center for the Arts regularly includes visiting artists in programming for the AfterSchool program.

A video and photos of the program are below: (Photos by Hannah Norman ’16)

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New Environmental Film Series to be Presented by COE, CFA

Beginning this month, Wesleyan’s College of the Environment, Center for the Arts and other outside partners will present “The Elements: An Annual Environmental Film Series.”

The first film, Elemental, will be screened at 7:30 p.m. March 30 in the Center for the Arts Hall. The award-winning film follows three activists as they work to protect air, water and earth around the world, and offers a call for global action.

The second film in the series, WATERSHEDwill be screened at 7 p.m. May 4 in Middlesex Community College’s Chapman Hall, 100 Training Hill Rd. in Middletown. Executive produced and narrated by Robert Redford, this film tells the story of threats to the “once-mighty Colorado River, now dammed and diverted and struggling to support 30 million people.” The film offers solutions for “meeting the competing interests of cities, agriculture, industry, recreation, wildlife, and indigenous communities with rights to the waters, and the future of the American West.”

Admission to the screenings is free. For more information about the film series, call 860-685-3733. More information is available on the College of the Environment’s website.

The series is presented in partnership with The Connecticut River Coastal Conservation District, Middlesex Community College Environmental Science Program and The Rockfall Foundation.

Jazz Quartet Stanley Maxwell to Perform World Premieres March 1 at Russell House

Jazz quartet Stanley Maxwell will perform at 3 p.m. March 1 in the Russell House.

Jazz quartet Stanley Maxwell will perform at 3 p.m. March 1 in the Russell House.

Wesleyan’s “Music at the Russell House” series concludes with a free concert by the Connecticut-based jazz quartet Stanley Maxwell at 3 p.m. March 1 in the Russell House. The group plays music that blends tight arrangements with intricate group improvisations. The concert at Wesleyan will feature acoustic arrangements of original tunes from the past decade, including several world premieres.

Stanley Maxwell's Andy Chatfield, pictured second from left, composed several original tunes for the group that will make their world premier at the March 1 concert. (Photos by Sandy Aldieri of Perceptions Photography)

Stanley Maxwell’s Andy Chatfield, pictured second from left, composed several original tunes for the group that will make their world premiere at the March 1 concert. (Photos by Sandy Aldieri of Perceptions Photography)

Stanley Maxwell features the CFA’s Press and Marketing Director Andy Chatfield on drums, Mark Crino on bass, Eric DellaVecchia on alto saxophone, and Evan Green on piano.

The group has built a grassroots name for themselves at colleges and festivals throughout the northeast since 2001, combining the virtuosic and the simple into a visceral concoction, which helped lead to their winning “Best Jazz Band” in the Hartford Advocate’s Grand Band Slam Readers’ Poll in 2007, 2009, and 2010.

“Mousetrap,” an 11-bar blues written by pianist Evan Green, was influenced by Thelonious Monk, and was featured on Stanley Maxwell’s debut album Don’t Wake The Baby!  The band’s recording of the composition attracted international attention, including “Mousetrap” winning “Best Jazz Song” at the 7th annual Independent Music Awards in December 2007. The band also won the Relix Magazine November 2007 “JamOff” contest for unsigned artists, with “Mousetrap” featured on that month’s Relix CD sampler, included with over 100,000 issues of the internationally distributed magazine, dedicated to jam bands and improvisational music.

A Body in Fukushima: Photo, Video Exhibit on Display at 3 CFA Galleries

Patrick Dowdey, curator for the Freeman Center for East Asian Studies gallery, introduced the <em>Body in Fukushima</em> exhibit Feb. 5.

Patrick Dowdey, curator for the Freeman Center for East Asian Studies gallery, introduced the Body in Fukushima exhibit Feb. 5.

A Body in Fukushima, a series of color photographs and video presented in a groundbreaking exhibition across three Wesleyan galleries, is on display through April.

"Eiko in Fukushima, Komagamine No. 146, 17 January 2014," digital photo, 13.3" x 20", photo by William Johnston.

“Eiko in Fukushima, Komagamine No. 146, 17 January 2014,” is on display in the exhibit. (Photo by William Johnston)

The series is an exploration into the area around the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, which destabilized and melted down after a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in March 2011. The power plant released radioactive materials into the surrounding environment.

In 2014, dancer-choreographer Eiko Otake and photographer/historian William Johnston followed abandoned train tracks through desolate stations into eerily vacant towns and fields in Fukushima, Japan. Otake is a visiting instructor in dance and Johnston is professor of history, professor of east Asian studies, professor of environmental studies and professor of science in society.

“By placing my body in these places, I thought of the generations of people who used to live there. I danced so as not to forget,” Otake said. A project of witness, remembrance, and empathy, A Body in Fukushima grapples with the reality of human failure.

The explosions of the Daiichi Power Plant made the area uninhabitable. Sometimes in vulnerable gestures and at other times in a fierce dance, Otake embodies grief, anger and remorse. Johnston’s images capture her with the cries of the Fukushima landscapes.

The works can currently be seen at the Freeman Center for East Asian Studies Gallery, the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery and the Davison Art Center Gallery. More hours and more information see the exhibit’s website.

The exhibit features a photo and a video installation.

The exhibit features a photo and a video installation.

Faculty Curate Picture/Thing Exhibit in Zilkha Gallery

Sasha Rudensky, assistant professor of art, and Jeffrey Schiff, chair and professor of art and art history, curated and introduced the exhibit Picture/Thing Jan. 29 in the  Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery. Picture/Thing presents 10 artists who make hybrid objects that challenge the taxonomical limits of photography and sculpture at a time when the definitions of the two media continue to evolve.

Sasha Rudensky, assistant professor of art, and Jeffrey Schiff, chair and professor of art and art history, curated and introduced the exhibit Picture/Thing Jan. 29 in the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery. Picture/Thing presents 10 artists who make hybrid objects that challenge the taxonomical limits of photography and sculpture at a time when the definitions of the two media continue to evolve.