Tag Archive for Class of 2015

Students Honored For Academic Achievement with Awards, Fellowships

During the Academic Scholarships, Fellowships and Prizes Reception May 7, Yan Pui "Angela" Lo '14, Julian Theseria '14 and Paul Hanakata '14 received honors. Lo received the Holzberg Fellowship and Frances M. Sheng Prize, awarded for excellence in Chinese language and excellence in Japanese language. Theseria received the Baden-Württemberg Connecticut Sister State Exchange Award and the Scott Prize for German Studies. Hanakata received the Bertman Prize.

During the Academic Scholarships, Fellowships and Prizes Reception May 7, Yan Pui “Angela” Lo ’14, Julian Theseria ’14 and Paul Hanakata ’14 received honors. Lo received the Holzberg Fellowship for psychology research and the Frances M. Sheng Prize for Japanese language. Theseria received the Baden-Württemberg Connecticut Sister State Exchange Award and the Scott Prize for German Studies. Hanakata received the Bertman Prize for physics research.

Wesleyan hosted the Academic Scholarships, Fellowships and Prizes Reception for students May 7 in Daniel family Commons.

“We gather today to honor students who represent the highest ideals of Wesleyan University―intellectual curiosity, academic excellence, creative expression, leadership, and service. While celebrating these recipients of awards, prizes, and scholarships, we also honor and thank alumni and friends whose generous contributions make these prizes possible,” said Ruth Striegel Weissman, provost and vice president for academic affairs.

The prizes and recipients are listed below:

Butterfield Prize 

Established by the Class of 1967 and awarded to the graduating senior who has exemplified those qualities of character, leadership, intellectual commitment and concern for the Wesleyan community shown by Victor Lloyd Butterfield, 11th president of the University.

Andrew Trexler ’14 

Nicole Updegrove ’14 

Rachel Sobelsohn '17, at right, was the recipient of the Susan Frazer Prize. The prize is awarded to students who have done the most distinguished work in the elementary and intermediate French language sequence.

Rachel Sobelsohn ’17, at right, was the recipient of the Susan Frazer Prize. The prize is awarded to students who have done the most distinguished work in the elementary and intermediate French language sequence.

Chadbourne Prize 

The gift of George Storrs Chadbourne, Class of 1858, to that member of the first-year class outstanding in character, conduct, and scholarship.

Ya-Lih Horng ’17 

Limbach Prize 

Established in 1966 by Russell T. Limbach, professor of art, in memory of his wife, Edna Limbach. Awarded annually to the student who has contributed the most imaginative, generous, thoughtful, and understanding social service to the people of the City of Middletown and/or the Wesleyan community.

Joshua Krugman ’14 

Catherine Marquez ’16 

Wesleyan Memorial Prize 

The gift of undergraduates in the Class of 1943 in memory of fellow students who made the supreme sacrifice in the Second World War, to the members of the junior class outstanding in qualities of character, leadership, and scholarship.

Gabriel Gordon ’15 

Christian Hosam ’15

Academic Scholarships, Fellowships, and Prizes 

Pictured are, at left, Benjamin Jacobs '14 and Benjamin Carus '14. Jacobs received the Sheng Prize, a Fulbright Fellowship and the Hallowell Prize. Carus received the Plukas Teaching Apprentice Award and White Prize. Alex Iselin '14 received the Plukas Teaching Apprentice Award, Wilde Prize and White Prize.

Pictured are, at left, Benjamin Jacobs ’14, Benjamin Carus ’14 and Alex Iselin ’14. Jacobs received the Sheng Prize, a Fulbright Fellowship and the Hallowell Prize. Carus received the Plukas Teaching Apprentice Award and White Prize. Iselin ’14 received the Plukas Teaching Apprentice Award, Wilde Prize and White Prize.

George H. Acheson and Grass Foundation Prize in Neuroscience 

Established in 1992 by a gift from the Grass Foundation, this prize is awarded to an outstanding undergraduate in the Neuroscience and Behavior Program who demonstrates excellence in the program and who also shows promise for future contributions in the field of neuroscience.

Adele Bubnys ’14 

Rachel Rosengard ’14 

Alumni Prize in the History of Art 

Established by Wesleyan alumni and awarded to a senior who has demonstrated special aptitude in the history of art and who has made a substantive contribution to the major.

Isadora Dannin ’14 

Government Major Benares ’15 Creates “Electronic Bookshelf” to Benefit Teachers in the Philippines

BUKO founder Joaquin Benares explains BUKO components to teachers.

BUKO founder Joaquin Benares explains BUKO components to teachers.

In this issue of The Wesleyan Connection, we speak with Joaquin Benares ’15, who recently was awarded a Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship Seed Grant for his project, Boundless Updated Knowledge Offline (BUKO). BUKO uses an electronic bookshelf (Raspberry Pi powered server) to bring video lectures, e-textbooks and other educational tools to Philippine public schools to supplement their (sometimes nonexistent) libraries, teaching aids and contact time with teachers.

Q: Where did you grow up and how did you end up coming to Wesleyan?

A: I was born and raised in Manila, the capital of the Philippines. I attended high school at the International School of Manila. Long story short, I learned about Wesleyan from my uncle, who went here in the 80’s. I always knew that I wanted to go to school in New England, but I wasn’t sure whether I wanted to go to a university or a smaller liberal arts college. As I was touring around the area, my uncle told me to drop by Wes and he gave me a tour of his old campus, which he injected with memories of his adventures. I was sold.

Q: How did your personal experience growing up in the Philippines influence your decision to create Boundless Updated Knowledge Offline (BUKO)?

A: In high school, I worked with a small group teaching supplementary English classes in public schools just outside the city. I was given a first-hand view of the lack of resources afforded to these schools, coupled with the increased demand from an ever-growing number of students. I learned that many of the children we taught had family members who had left the country to pursue service-level jobs so that their families could make ends meet.

Roberts ’15 Presents Psychology Research at Professional Meeting

Jillian Roberts ’15

Jillian Roberts ’15

Jillian Roberts ’15 presented a poster at the Annual Meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association in Boston, Mass. on March 15.

The poster, titled “Influence of minimal group membership on children’s ideas of equality,” is co-authored by Jessica Taggart, research associate and Psychology Department lab coordinator, and Hilary Barth, associate professor of psychology, associate professor of neuroscience and behavior.

Roberts developed the project herself and has conducted the research over the past two years.

Exhibit by Rothberg ’15 Juxtaposes Historical, Contemporary Fashion

An exhibit curated by Emma Rothberg ’15 is on display at the Middlesex County Historical Society in Middletown. In “Juxtaposing Likeness: Fashion Accessories from the Collection of the Middlesex County Historical Society,” museum volunteer Rothberg presents about two dozen items from the late 18th century to the early 20th century, including jewelry, hats, spectacles, a silk parasol, fans and a man’s leather billfold from just after the American Revolution. The items are displayed in two glass cases inside the museum.

Rothberg’s exhibit also was featured in a December 2013 issue of The Hartford Courant.

Her exhibit statement reads:

“Clothing, potentially more than other artifacts, can transport us to a time or place that we are otherwise distanced from. Clothing is recognizable. It is no stretch of the mind to imagine putting on a shoe, a skirt, or a hat. That transformative moment is when we remember that under that skirt are a bustle, a hoop, and a pair of pantaloons. What would it be like to wear our everyday outfits with all that extra stuff?

The Middlesex County Historical Society’s textile collection is extensive, spanning time, types and styles. This Exhibition only presents a very small portion of all the artifacts housed upstairs. If anything, this collection is representative of what I felt were interesting examples of accessories; ones that I latched onto. The objects chosen represent what I am calling “juxtaposition”: men’s vs. women’s, adults’ vs. children’s, ornate vs. utilitarian. They are placed next to what I saw as their direct opposite, but there are other connections to be made. I hope each object can tell a small story—whether it is one that the object has already or one that the viewer conjures themselves.”

These spectacles were owned by Colonel Jeremiah Wadsworth (July 12, 1743—April 30, 1802) who served as a Revolutionary War soldier and Congressman. After the Revolution, Col. Wadsworth became one of the richest men in Connecticut.

These spectacles were owned by Colonel Jeremiah Wadsworth (July 12, 1743—April 30, 1802) who served as a Revolutionary War soldier and Congressman. After the Revolution, Col. Wadsworth became one of the richest men in Connecticut.

Porter ’15 Works as Diversity Intern with Ocean Drilling Program

Nishaila Porter ’15 and her fellow Diversity Intern, Ernesto Martinez from the University of California, Berkeley, were included in "Core Discoveries: The Newsletter for US Scientific Ocean Drilling.

Nishaila Porter ’15 and her fellow Diversity Intern, Ernesto Martinez from the University of California, Berkeley, were included in “Core Discoveries: The Newsletter for US Scientific Ocean Drilling.”

Over the summer, Nishaila Porter ’15 worked on a research project as a 2013 Diversity Intern at Columbia University. The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program and the U.S. Implementing Organization cosponsored the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory Summer Intern Program at Columbia University for the second consecutive year.

The goal of the Columbia University Diversity Internship is to “expose minority students to careers in scientific ocean drilling by providing them with a 10–12 week educational and career building experience.” Current interns work with mentors on research projects using scientific ocean drilling data.

While working on the project, titled “Which Marine Fossil Assemblages Best Match Ice Core Assemblages,” Porter used samples from sites with sediments of Eocene age that are rich in diatom and compared them to the diatom assemblage in the GISP2 ice core that was collected in Greenland in order to determine the likely source of diatoms in the ice core.

Porter’s advisor is Suzanne O’Connell, professor of earth and environmental sciences.

Baumgartner ’15 Authors 2 Scientific Papers

Elizabeth Baumgartner ’15 co-authored two scientific papers that were recently published as abstracts and presented as posters at “PAINWeek 2013: The National Conference on Pain for Frontline Practitioners,” a national medical conference held on Sept. 4–7 in Las Vegas, Nev. As part of an internship this summer with Purdue Pharma LP’s Department of Risk Management and Epidemiology, Baumgartner, who is majoring in neuroscience and behavior and the Science in Society Program, participated as a member of a team of epidemiologists doing primary research on the impact of the use and abuse of prescription opioids on both patient and abuser populations.

The White House, the CDC and the FDA have identified prescription opioid abuse and opioid overdose as major public health issues. Using the MarketScan™ Commercial Database of insurance claims, the research team described opioid use patterns and risk factors for overdose, which culminated in the preparation of the two peer-reviewed publication.

In the article, “Clinical characteristics of opioid overdose cases identified in a large commercially insured population,” Baumgartner and her co-authors studied a database of nearly 100 million insured patients and identified that nearly half of the patients presenting to an Emergency Room with opioid overdose did not have a prescription for the opioid and that one of the strongest risk factors for overdose was concomitant use of another psychoactive drug and/or a co-morbid psychiatric disorder. In the article, “Duration of use of hydrocodone/acetaminophen, immediate release oxycodone, and extended release morphine in a commercially insured population,” the co-authors showed that more than 40,000 insured patients continued to use pain medicines beyond three months, a frequency 1.6-fold and 3.0-fold greater than that for extended-release oxycodone and extended-release morphine, respectively, both of which are intended for chronic use.

See PDFs of her research posters here and here.

Neuroscience Major Fraiman ’15 Encourages Students to Become WesEMTs

In this issue of The Wesleyan Connection, we speak with Aviv Fraiman from the Class of 2015.

Aviv Fraiman '15 is president of the WesEMT organization. She also works as a probationary EMT for the Haddam Volunteer Ambulance Service. "I always carry my (EMT) bag with me. I never know when I'm going to need it."

Aviv Fraiman ’15 is president of the WesEMT organization. She also works as a probationary EMT for the Haddam Volunteer Ambulance Service. “I always carry my (EMT) bag with me. I never know when I’m going to need it.”

Q: Aviv, what are you majoring in and why?

A: I’m majoring in neuroscience and behavior because I find the brain absolutely fascinating. When I think of the brain, I’m reminded of a puzzle, except instead of the pieces being cardboard shapes, they’re an interwoven tangle of yarn. All the different pathways – it’s really chaotic, but there’s such beauty in its design. Neuroscience is a field where there’s an endless amount to learn and that really excites me.

Q: You’re currently President of the WesEMT organization. What made you decided to become an Emergency Medical Technician?  

A: Before coming to Wesleyan, I was a Lifeguard certified in CPR, AED (automated external defibrillator) and basic wound management and care. Additionally I had experience volunteering in hospitals, shadowing physicians and overseeing surgeries. However, I was not an Emergency Medical Technician.

My freshman year, I heard that Wesleyan was hosting an EMT certification course and decided to go to the information session. The course instructor, Emily Masters, was so eloquent in her explanation of what an EMT was: Someone who is calm in chaos, and able to think critically in difficult situations. But moreover, she demonstrated that an EMT must be compassionate, caring, responsible and have leadership skills. Before I even went to the information session, I knew I wanted to save lives, but I left the information session knowing that by taking that course, I would get closer to that goal. So, I took the class. I think it was one of the best decisions I’ve made at Wesleyan.

Q: When is the training, and for how long?

A: WesEMT hosts an EMT certification course annually. The course starts mid-September and ends in late-April/early-May. This year there are about 40 students enrolled. Last Sunday was our first official class. We went over CPR with a video demonstration and the students practiced on manikins – it went really well!

Q: Who should consider becoming a WesEMT? What are the benefits of having this training?

A: Everyone should consider becoming a WesEMT! No matter what your goals are in life, the skills that you are taught in this course are applicable.

Video of WeSlam Poet Myers ’15 Receives 1.7M Views

Lily Myers ’15, a member of WeSlam, performed a poem about her family that has received more than 1.7 million views on YouTube.

The poem, titled “Shrinking Women,” won Best Love Poem at the 2013 College Unions Poetry Slam Invitational in April, and expresses the pressure women feel to take up less and less space, to be quiet, to be small and to eat sparingly.

Fellow slam poet Evan Okun ’13 said, “Her piece exemplifies Wesleyan’s progressive thinking, innovative writing, and emotional honesty when it comes to Slam Poetry.”

Myers also appeared in Upworthy.com and The Huffington Post. She is currently studying abroad in Argentina.

Watch the video below:

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10 Students Tend 2 Acres at Wesleyan’s Long Lane Farm

Students learn about sustainable agriculture at Long Lane Farm.

Students learn about sustainable agriculture at Long Lane Farm.

While their classmates spend the summer growing business contacts at off-campus internships, 10 Wesleyan students hope to cultivate something equally lucrative – sustainable agriculture.

The “dirt in the nails” days are long but satisfying at Wesleyan’s Long Lane Organic Farm, a student-run organic farm that gives students a place to experiment and learn about sustainable agriculture. Sustainable agriculture integrates three main goals – environmental health, economic profitability, and social and economic equity.

Johnson is one of 10 student farmers working at Long Lane this summer. After graduating, Johnson hopes to study astrophysics and ultimately become an astronaut.

Coady Johnson ’15 harvests radishes at Long Lane Farm this summer. After graduating, Johnson hopes to study astrophysics and ultimately become an astronaut.

This summer, the students are cultivating two acres of land, the biggest plot they’ve ever farmed. They’re growing cucumbers, radishes, tomatoes, tomatillos, squash, asparagus, basil, broccoli, lettuce, blueberries and much more. They’re also building a second hoop house, similar to a greenhouse, which will allow the students to grow leafy greens, peppers and other crops during the fall and winter months.

Not all students have a farming background. Summer farmer Coady Johnson ’15 grew up an hour north of Chicago in Wadsworth, Ill. where “most of the surrounding area is cornfields, but even so I didn’t get involved in farming until coming to Wesleyan,” he said.

At Wesleyan, Johnson fell in with a group of people who inspired him to think about the state of food production and consumption in this country.

“Industrial farming and a disconnect between what we eat and how it is produced is hurting our well-being, and I think that the best way to remedy that is to educate myself and others on growing our own food in a more responsible and sustainable way.”

A day down on the farm begins at 7 a.m. with a morning meeting . There, the students discuss plans for work, “like whether or not we should companion plant radishes with the squash. We try to be horizontally organized and make decisions only with 100 percent consensus, so that everyone can have a say in what we’re doing, and can suggest new ideas if they want,” Johnson said.

The students work until 11 a.m. and take a midday heat break. During time, the farmers run errands and do other work for the farm that can be done in the field, like emails and budget spreadsheets. At 3 p.m., the students return to the fields and work until 7 p.m. The farmers also choose to participate in various building projects such as planning and building the mass irrigation system.

Jessup Smith ’14 and nine other Wesleyan students enrolled in the Architecture II course designed and built a new chicken coop for Long Lane Farm.

Jessup Smith ’14 and nine other Wesleyan students enrolled in the Architecture II course designed and built a new chicken coop for Long Lane Farm. Pictured, Smith is crawling through the coop’s exterior entryway.

Food harvested from the farm is sold at the North End Farmers’ Market throughout the summer, and at the Wesleyan Farmers’ Market during the academic year. The student farmers donate excess food to Amazing Grace Food Pantry in Middletown, and have an arrangement through which Bon Appetít dining services funds positions for students to work on the farm in exchange for weekly deliveries of farm vegetables. In addition, the students invite local families to the farm and teach children about the various aspects of farming and producing food. Children are sent home with a bag of produce that they personally harvested.

Next fall, a flock of feathery friends will join the students at the farm. A newly-designed and installed chicken coop will enable the farmers to harvest local eggs for use at Usdan University Center. Learn more about the coop in this Wesleyan Connection article.

The summer farmers are Laura Cohen ’14, Kate Enright ’15, Coady Johnson ’15, Ben Guilmette ’15, Josh Krugman ’14, Maggie Masselli ’16, Anna Redgrave ’16, Rebecca Sokol ’15, Hailey Sowden ’15 and Cat Walsh ’16. And they’re always looking for extra working hands.

“Whoever wants to help is a farmer, and we’re always looking for new people, from Wesleyan or from Middletown at large,” Johnson said.

Learn more about the farm’s

Photos of the farm are below:

farm (4)

Johnson ’15 Tends Wesleyan’s Long Lane Farm, Tutors Physics Students

Johnson is one of 10 student farmers working at Long Lane this summer. After graduating, Johnson hopes to study astrophysics and ultimately become an astronaut.

Coady Johnson ’15 harvests radishes at Long Lane Farm this summer. After graduating, Johnson hopes to study astrophysics and ultimately become an astronaut.

Q: Coady, what are you majoring in and why did you choose Wesleyan?

A: I’m double majoring in astronomy and physics. I had actually never been to Wesleyan before applying, but I had heard very good things from friends, and its reputation for being unconventional was very appealing to me. The clincher though was the very generous financial aid that the university offered me, without which I definitely would not be here.

Coady Johnson '15, who is double majoring in astronomy and physics, tends a booth at the North End Farmers' Market, where he sells produce from Wesleyan's Long Lane Organic Farm. Johnson is one of 10 student farmers working at Long Lane this summer. After graduating, Johnson hopes to study astrophysics and ultimately become an astronaut.

Coady Johnson ’15, who is double majoring in astronomy and physics, tends a booth at the North End Farmers’ Market, where he sells produce from Wesleyan’s Long Lane Organic Farm.

Q: Tell us about your efforts with the Long Lane Organic Farm. Why did you decide to become a student-farmer?

A: After coming to Wesleyan, I fell in with a group of people who really got me thinking about the state of food production and consumption in this country. Industrial farming and a disconnect between what we eat and how it is produced is hurting our well-being, and I think that the best way to remedy that is to educate myself and others on growing our own food in a more responsible and sustainable way.

Q: What is your role with the farm this summer? Please describe a day “down on the farm.”

A:  We don’t really have set roles, although I often choose to participate in or initiate various building projects, like planning and building our irrigation system. Our day begins at 7 a.m. with a morning meeting at the farm. There, all the people who are working that day discuss plans for work, like whether or not we should companion plant radishes with the squash. We try to be horizontally organized and make decisions only with 100 percent consensus, so that everyone can have a say in what we’re doing, and can suggest new ideas if they want. We work until 11, and then have a midday break, during which we eat lunch, run errands and do other work for the farm that can be done in the field, like emails and budget spreadsheets. At 3 p.m., we return to the farm and review what was accomplished in the morning, and then finish up whatever wasn’t quite done by lunch. At 7 we close up the shed and gates, and then return home for dinner. Nine of us live in the same house, and so whoever takes the afternoon off cooks dinner for the house.

Q: Who else is working on the farm this summer? Are you looking for new recruits?

A: Laura Cohen ’14, Kate Enright ’15, Ben Guilmette ’15, Josh Krugman ’14, Maggie Masselli ’16, Anna Redgrave ’16, Rebecca Sokol ’15, Hailey Sowden ’15 and Cat Walsh ’16 are all living in Middletown to work on the farm this summer. Whoever wants to help is a farmer, and we’re always looking for new people, from Wesleyan or from Middletown at large.

Q: Where are you from? Did you have any farming background or is this all new to you?

A: I’m from Wadsworth, Ill., which is about an hour north of Chicago and 15 minutes west of Lake Michigan. Most of the surrounding area is cornfields, but even so I didn’t get involved in farming until coming to Wesleyan.

Q: What does the farm do with the produce that you grow?

A: We give a lot of it to Bon Appetít, the campus dining service, so that they can serve it in the dining hall. Another large portion we take to the North End Farmers’ Market in Middletown. Anything we bring to the market and don’t sell is then donated to the Amazing Grace food pantry. We also have a new program this year with families in the area called the Middletown Food Project. We have the families over to the farm and teach the children about various aspects of farming and producing food, and also send everyone home with a bag of produce they harvest themselves. And we eat some of it ourselves, of course.

Q: What other extracurricular activities are you involved with at Wesleyan?

A: I tutor other students in General Physics II, and also have a job at the Star and Crescent, helping the head chef prep and serve the meals. This past spring I was in the Spring Dance performance, and I plan on auditioning for other dances in the future.

Q: As a rising junior, do you know what your post-Wesleyan plans might be?

A: After Wesleyan I hope to get my Ph.D. in astrophysics, though I haven’t given much thought about a particular institution to attend. After that I plan on applying to NASA in order to be an astronaut. I know it sounds farfetched, especially given the current state of NASA, but I believe strongly in the scientific and societal benefits of manned space exploration, and also have a great personal passion for science, space and discovery.

 

Garcia ’15 is Pre-Med, a WesEMT, Tutor, Latin Dancer

Zaida Garcia '15 is double majoring in African-American studies and feminist, gender and sexuality studies. She's on the board for Ajùa Campos, she teaches about health sexual attitudes and education to high school students, she is a Latin dancer and a gallery monitor at Zilkha Gallery.

Zaida Garcia ’15 is double majoring in African-American studies and feminist, gender and sexuality studies. She’s on the board for Ajùa Campos, she teaches about health sexual attitudes and education to high school students, she is a Latin dancer and a gallery monitor at Zilkha Gallery.

Q: Zaida, where are you from and what attracted you to Wesleyan?

A: I’m from Flushing, New York. Initially, I was attracted to Wesleyan because many students from the program I attend, Prep for Prep, have gone to or currently attend Wes. Since many students I respect went there, I figured that there must be something about this school that keeps bringing us here. I realized through my visits and talks with students that I love Wesleyan’s openness and diversity. Of course, no institution is perfect when it comes to embracing so many views, but Wesleyan offers far more than many other places. Everyone I met was so interesting!

Q: What are you majoring in and why is it important to you to have a liberal arts education?

A: I’m a double major in African-American studies and feminist, gender and sexuality studies. I’m also pre-med! My fields of study aren’t traditionally thought of as routes to the medical world, but I believe the humanities are necessary towards any career path. I find the sciences fascinating and vital, but in medical school they will surround me constantly, and I do not want to ever loose sight of the fact that the job requires that I interact with people. We need to understand why certain populations have unequal access to quality treatment, or why someone may be afraid to report their injuries of domestic violence. Otherwise, a doctor can’t serve anyone fully. Wesleyan’s liberal arts education allows me the flexibility to explore these while still fulfilling my pre-med requirements. I am especially glad to be surrounded by Wesleyan’s amazing visual arts.

Q: Who are some of your favorite professors, and classes at Wes?

A: Last semester, I took Service-Learning at Connecticut Valley Hospital with Professor Jim Donady. The concrete end-goal of the course was to interview our psychiatric patients using the CASIG (Client’s Assessment of Strengths, Interests, and Goals). But it was the intangible that I will never forget from this class: the affirmation of humanity. We are all people, yet some discard those with mental illness as “crazy”, as “other”, literally denying someone’s personhood. You might not think someone else, or even your own self, is interesting or deserving of respect. But you can make a movie out of anyone’s life, it is that important. You can make a life out of your life if you wanted to, you and everyone else is that important. Professor Donady’s stories and quirky ways have affirmed that. Additionally, Leah Wright’s Introduction to Modern African American History is the reason why I am an African-American Studies Major and Leticia Alvarado’s Latina Feminisms is why I’m pursuing FGSS. These amazing women have also taught me to dissect and trace back the chain reactions that create a person.

Q: What do you hope to do after Wesleyan?

A: After Wesleyan, I hope to become a gynecologist for underserved communities.

Wesleyan Slam Poets Place 13th in National Competition

Wesleyan’s WESlam team placed 13th out of 59 college teams from around the country in the 2013 College Unions Poetry Slam Invitational, held April 3-6 at Barnard College in New York City.

Five students, Evan Okun ’13, Lily Myers ’15 , Zachary Goldberg ’13, Cherkira Lashely ’15 and Markeisha Hill ’16 competed on the team and Emily Weitzman ’14 coached. Lily Myers won the award for best love poem.

“‘Most moving’ was the response Wesleyan got from community ,” Okun said. “We were complemented for our creative manner in which we resisted the typical ‘slam-poem-formula’ that is often over dramatic and exploitative of personal trauma.”

Watch Zachary Goldberg, Evan Okun and Lily Myers perform “We Made It:”

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