Tag Archive for Ellen Thomas

Thomas Published in Geology, Paleoceanography

Ellen Thomas, research professor of earth and environmental sciences, is the co-author of several new articles including:

“High-resolution deep-sea carbon and oxygen isotope records of Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 and H2 and implications for the origin of early Paleogene hyperthermal events,” published in Geology, 2010;

“Export Productivity and Carbonate Accumulation in the Pacific Basin at the Transition from Greenhouse to Icehouse Climate (Late Eocene to Early Oligocene),” published in Paleoceanography, 2010;

“Cenozoic record of elongate, cylindrical deep-sea benthic Foraminifera in the North Atlantic and equatorial Pacific Oceans,” published in Marine Micropaleontology, 74: 75-95, 2010;

And “Cenozoic Record of Elongate, Cylindrical, Deep-Sea Benthic Foraminifera in the Indian Ocean (ODP Sites 722, 738, 744, 758 and 763),” published in the Journal of Foraminiferal Research, 40: 113-133, 2010.

Varekamp, Thomas Present Papers at Estuarine Research Conference

Johan Varekamp, the Harold T. Stearns Professor in Earth Science, and Ellen Thomas, research professor of earth and environmental sciences, presented papers at the Estuaries and Coasts in a Changing World conference of the Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation in Portland, Ore. Nov. 1-5.

Their talks were titled “Proxies for Eutrophication in Long Island Sound” and ” Hypoxia in Long Island Sound – Since When and Why.”

Thomas’s Paper on Foraminifera Published by Academy of Sciences

Ellen Thomas

Ellen Thomas

A paper co-authored by Ellen Thomas, research professor of earth and environmental sciences, was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, July 2009.

In the article, “Surviving mass extinction by bridging the benthic/planktic divide,” Thomas and her colleagues show a very unexpected observations, i.e. that a species of foraminifera, which lives floating in the surface waters of the Indian Ocean, is genetically the same as a species living on the bottom of the ocean in shallow waters (between tide levels, coast of Kenya) – using DNA analysis.

“We then show, using a sophisticated way of chemical analysis, that it was not just blown there by storms, but formed its shell there in the surface waters,” Thomas explains. “We then interpret these data, and argument that such species that live both on the bottom and floating in surface waters (until now unknown for foraminifera) are much better able to survive the adverse environmental effects at such times as the meteorite impact that resulted in the extinction of the dinosaurs.”

The story is written up by the UK counterpart of the National Science Foundation (NERC), which funded the first author of the paper, Kate Darling.

Thomas Published in Science Magazine

Ellen Thomas, research professor of earth and environmental sciences, is a co-author of an article on the “long record of the Ca-isotope composition of seawater,” published in Science Magazine Dec. 15.