Tag Archive for photography

Students Re-Create Rural Arkansas Portraits

Aaron Peisner '12 and Garth Taylor '12 pose in a photo during the opening reception for Mike Disfarmer: Photographs in the Zilkha Gallery Oct. 9. Hailing from the small mountain town of Heber Springs, Arkansas, the photographer known as Mike Disfarmer captured the lives and emotions of rural Arkansans in starkly intimate portraits.

Aaron Peisner '12 and Garth Taylor '12 pose in a photo during the opening reception for Mike Disfarmer: Photographs in the Zilkha Gallery Oct. 9. Hailing from the small mountain town of Heber Springs, Arkansas, the photographer known as Mike Disfarmer captured the lives and emotions of rural Arkansans in starkly intimate portraits.

Aaron Peisner '12 and Garth Taylor '12 pose as rural Arkansans living between 1939 and 1945 in this portrait.

Aaron Peisner '12 and Garth Taylor '12 pose as rural Arkansans living between 1939 and 1945 in this portrait.

Cordelia Blanchard '12, Lindsay Keys '11, and Daria Lombroso '11 mimic Disfarmer's portraits by reflecting the mood at the height of the Great Depression. Disfarmer's photographs show the dramatic shifts during the war years, as well as the transformations of postwar prosperity.

Cordelia Blanchard '12, Lindsay Keys '11, and Daria Lombroso '11 mimic Disfarmer's portraits by reflecting the mood at the height of the Great Depression. Disfarmer's photographs show the dramatic shifts during the war years, as well as the transformations of postwar prosperity.

Mary Lauran Hall '10 and Mark McCloughan '10 pose for their picture. All photos were e-mailed to students after the event. Accompanying photos taken by Disfarmer are included in the exhibit. The photographs in this exhibition were printed from the original glass plates, recovered in the 1970s from Disfarmer's studio.

Mary Lauran Hall '10 and Mark McCloughan '10 pose for their picture. All photos were e-mailed to students after the event. Accompanying photos taken by Disfarmer are included in the exhibit. The photographs in this exhibition were printed from the original glass plates, recovered in the 1970s from Disfarmer's studio.

Fields’s ’03 Photograph Accepted into Juried Competition

"Rest" by Jenny Fields.

"Rest" by Jenny Fields.

A photograph by Jenny Fields ’03, digital asset and project coordinator for University Communications, was chosen to be part of the Shoreline Arts Alliance’s IMAGES photography exhibit. The annual, juried photography competition is open to all residents of Connecticut and is highly regarded for excellence statewide. The exhibition will run from Feb. 9-28 at the Guilford Art Center, 411 Church Street, Guilford, Conn. The gallery is open from noon to 4 p.m. daily.

The photo, titled “Rest,” is part of a series Fields photographed to chronicle the end of her grandmother’s life.

“It’s true that art heals,” Fields writes in her artist’s statement. “Somehow, the loss took on a different meaning with the inception of this project. I believe that as a culture, we would be better off if we started addressing inevitability, end results, final products. My grandmother taught me not to waste, how to stretch resources, and how to make the best of any situation. She taught us all how to live well, and how to die with dignity.”

Student Art Calls Attention to Race, Class Elitism

Several Wesleyan students of color are hosting an art show Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery South through the end of Feburary. Pictured is a photograpy collage titled "En Kolkata" created by Priya Ghosh '09.

An exhibit titled "Be the Art: You Want to See in the World" is on display in the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery, South Gallery through Feb. 15. The show will be transferred to Usdan University Center thereafter. Pictured is a collage of photographs titled "En Kolkata" created by Priya Ghosh '09.

Exhibit Examines Post-Soviet Russia through Photography, Video

Sasha Rudensky, <i>Bus Station</i>, Sevastopol, Ukraine, 2004, chromogenic print.

Sasha Rudensky's "Bus Station," Sevastopol, Ukraine, 2004, chromogenic print.

In her first major solo exhibition, visiting professor of art Sasha Rudensky ’01, will present two photographic series at Wesleyan University’s Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery: “Remains” (2004/08) and “Demons” (2007–08).

In “Remains,” Rudensky, who was born in Moscow in 1979 and moved to the United States in 1990, explores the political and social transformation of the former Soviet Union by poignantly focusing on the intimate details of everyday life. “Demons,” a series of hybrid portraits, suggests a fantastical version of the artist’s childhood.

Rudensky “Remains” in the fall of 2004 after receiving a Mortimer Hays Brandeis traveling fellowship. Her images, however, turned out to be very different than what she first intended to photograph.

“My proposal was to document mining towns in Siberia and the arctic north,” Rudensky says. “But having gotten there and after doing some preliminary shooting, I realized I didn’t want to simply document post-soviet devastation of depressed towns,

Photographers Speak on ‘Eye of History: The Camera as Witness’ Panel

The Camera as Witness" presentation and panel Nov. 7.

Documentary photographer Wendy Ewald explained how photography relates to personal history during the "Eye of History: The Camera as Witness" presentation and panel Nov. 7.

“We can never really claim to have seen anything unless it has been photographed.” — Émile Zola, c. 1901, Minutes of the Camera Club of Paris

Documentary photographers, contemporary visual artists and historians grapple with issues of photographic meaning, evidence, and interpretation.

This fall, Wesleyan has hosted a series of exhibitions, talks and films that explore photography’s role in historiography, historical memory and public life. Organized by Associate Professor of History Jennifer Tucker, “Eye of History: The Camera as Witness” serves as a meeting point for people who share a common interest in photography, art and historical memory.

On Nov. 7, internationally-renowned documentary photographers Wendy Ewald, Eric Gottesman and Susan Meiselas joined acclaimed writer and critic David Levi Strauss in a panel discussion about photography’s role in the world today.

Climate Change Topic of Photography Exhibit

NAME speaks about her photograph titled "NAME" during the opening reception for the exhibit <i>Photographic Window on Causes of Climate Change</i> Nov. 5 in Van Vleck Observatory.

Erin Arai, a graduate student in astronomy, speaks about her photograph of a commuter rail station during the opening reception for the exhibit Photographic Window on Causes of Climate Change Nov. 5 in Van Vleck Observatory. All photographs in the show were taken by students enrolled in Astronomical Pedagogy Seminar, and exhibited waste and carbon use excesses.

New Magazine Gives Student Photographers Exposure

During a restless winter day in northeast Vermont, Katherine Bascom ‘10 had an indoor wrestling match with her overly energetic dog, Ori. Midway through the contest, Bascom grabbed a camera off her nightstand and began snapping some shots.

One of these photographs, a close-up action-shot of Ori, is the page 36 feature photo of Wesleyan’s new, student-run magazine called Exposure.