Tag Archive for Science in Society Program

Science in Society Major Lu ’17 Interested in Public Healthcare, Neurophysiology

Anna Lu ’17, who is majoring in the Science in Society Program, has a philosophy concentration with a focus on ethics and political philosophy. She's also minoring in East Asian studies. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

Anna Lu ’17, who is majoring in the Science in Society Program, has a philosophy concentration with a focus on ethics and political philosophy. She’s also minoring in East Asian studies. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

Q: Anna, where are you from and what attracted you to Wesleyan?

A: I am from Woodbridge, Conn. and I was born in New York, but I didn’t seriously look into Wesleyan until October of my senior year of high school! When I was looking for schools I wanted to stick closer to home and, at the time, I was being recruited for swimming—a sport that had dominated my time during high school and that I had decided to pursue at the collegiate level. Of all the schools I looked at, I narrowed it down to a couple NESCAC schools and Wesleyan was the best fit for me.

Q: What are you majoring in and why?

A: I came to Wesleyan planning to major in psychology, but as time progressed I fell in love with neuroscience and behavior. Last May, I changed my major from neuroscience to the Science in Society Program (SISP), a program that allows me to reach outside my comfort zone and, with a philosophy concentration a focus on ethics and political philosophy, allows me to focus on both current and historical issues within our healthcare system.

Q: Why did you decide to change majors?

A:  My parents are neuroscientists and were neurosurgeons back in China. I’m the older child of two in my family, as well as the first generation Chinese American student-athlete in my family to attend such a prestigious school. While I originally followed in my parents’ footsteps, I never fell in love with neuroscience the way I’ve fallen for the Science in Society Program. The time I spend learning about science in society and narrowing down a big issue within public healthcare to the commodification of our own bodies is absolutely mind blowing to me.

I don’t regret the hours I spent at a lab desk, or in a fume hook, mixing chemicals as well as making observations through the lens of a microscope as a neuroscience major. During my time at Wesleyan, I’ve been able to educate myself in a way I never imagined. I consider myself an existentialist; that is, I believe that what people choose to do reflects who they are and confirms who they will become. I value my social and extracurricular interactions, and I just didn’t think locking myself in a room mixing chemicals or performing surgeries on mice would be conducive to a happy future for me.

Anna Lu '17  is enrolled in the HIST 368 class, History of Science and Technology in Modern China, this semester.

Anna Lu ’17 is enrolled in the HIST 368 class, History of Science and Technology in Modern China, this semester.

Q: What is your interest in healthcare?

A: I’ve always been a big advocate for personal health. I guess I can thank my parents for always being concerned about personal hygiene and health; both of them graduated from medical school, and I’ve always admired them for what they’ve done and how far they’ve come.

Q: It sounds like your parents were quite influential.

A: My parents have had a big effect on me, and I appreciate them for their never-ending support, especially now that I’ve grown up and I’m experiencing more in the world.

Q: What have been your most instrumental classes at Wesleyan so far?

A:  I think my most instrumental class was Cellular Neurophysiology with Associate Professor Gloster Aaron. I was going through a personal and identity crisis at the time because I found the hard sciences were just not suitable for me anymore, and yet this class with Professor Gloster really helped me realize the importance of what I had done so far, at that time, and that I don’t have to pursue medical school right after college but have other options as well. Another class I really enjoyed was Classical Chinese Philosophy taught by Professor Stephen Angle in the College of East Asian Studies. I am a CEAS minor, as well as a philosophy concentration in the SISP major, and it was an amazing class for me to really go deeper into the history and understand why my parents raised me the way they did.

Q: What extracurricular activities are you involved in at Wesleyan?

A: I was on the Wesleyan Swimming and Diving team my freshman year, but I left the sport when I found myself going through the motions just because I was comfortable with my routine. I’ve been involved in the We Speak We Stand Bystander Intervention group on campus; we did a performance during freshman orientation, and I loved the experience and really hope I can partake in it again! I’d also like to have more experience within the community as well, and I’m very curious about the Wesleyan Center for Prison Education’s teaching program.

Q: What are your hobbies?

A: I’ve always been an athlete, so after I stopped swimming I decided to try running. I ran the half-marathon in Middletown in April, and I plan on running my second half-marathon this coming spring. And now that I have an apartment I can finally cook, so I enjoy making food with friends.

Q: How will you wrap up your junior year?

A: Right now I’m focusing and drilling down on my new SISP major. It’s so exciting and interesting, and very suitable for me.

 

Tucker Receives Huntington Fellowship in U.K.

Jennifer Tucker

Jennifer Tucker received a Huntington-British Academy Fellowship for study in Great Britain in summer 2011. Tucker is associate professor of history, associate professor of feminist, gender and sexuality studies, associate professor of science in society.

In cooperation with the British Academy, the Huntington offers a limited number of one-month exchange fellowships in any of the fields in which the Huntington collections are strong and where the research will be carried out in the United Kingdom. These fellowships are awarded to postdoctoral scholars.

The Huntington is an independent research center with holdings in British and American  history, literature, art history, and the history of science and  medicine. The Library collections range chronologically from the 11th century to the present and include a half-million rare books, nearly six million manuscripts, 800,000 photographs, and a large ephemera collection, supported by a half-million reference works.

Tucker also received a Curran Fellowship for 2011, according to the Research Society for Victorian Periodicals (RSVP).  Tucker is carrying out a study of the British press’s coverage of the Tichborne Claimant trials, 1871-74.

Fellowship Supports Tucker’s 19th-Century British Press Research

Jennifer Tucker

Jennifer Tucker, associate professor of history, associate professor of science in society, associate professor of feminist, gender and sexuality studies, is the recipient of the Curran Fellowship for 2011, according to the Research Society for Victorian Periodicals (RSVP).

The Curran Fellowship, made possible through the generosity of Eileen Curran, professor emerita of English at Colby College, and inspired by her pioneering research, provides research and travel grants intended to aid scholars studying 19th-century British magazines and newspapers in making use of primary print and manuscript sources.

Tucker is carrying out a study of the British press’s coverage of the Tichborne Claimant trials, 1871-74.

Morawski Published in Theory and Psychology, History of Psychology

Jill Morawski, professor of psychology, professor of science in society, professor of feminist, gender and sexuality studies, is the author of “The Location of our Debates: Finding, Fixing and Enacting Reality,” published in Theory and Psychology; “Review of Beyond the Box: B.F. Skinner’s Technology of Behavior from Laboratory to Life,” published in Isis; and “Postwar Promises and Perplexities in the Social Sciences: The Case of ‘Socialization’,” published in History of Psychology.

Laura Stark: New Sociology and Science in Society Assistant Professor

Laura Stark, assistant professor of science in society, assistant professor of sociology, is new to Wesleyan this fall semester.

Laura Stark, assistant professor of science in society, assistant professor of sociology, is teaching The Sociology of Medicine and Regulating Health, both part of the Science in Society Program.

Laura Stark has joined the Department of Sociology and the Program in Science in Society as assistant professor.

Her research focuses on the social history and sociology of medicine, research ethics, human subject research, Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), and group/committee decision-making in healthcare.

Stark graduated from Cornell University in 1998 with a bachelor’s in communication. She went on to obtain a Master’s and a Ph.D. in Sociology from Princeton University, ending in 2006. She was awarded the biannual prize for best dissertation from the History of Science Society’s Forum for the History of the Human Sciences for her work titled “Morality in Science: How Research is Evaluated in the Age of Human Subjects Regulation.”

Stark was a postdoctoral fellow in Northwestern University’s Department of Sociology and Program in Science in Human Culture Program. She been working