Tag Archive for Wasch Center

Retired Faculty Honored at Reception

Eleven faculty retired in 2016-17. In 2017: David Beveridge, the Joshua Boger University Professor of the Sciences and Mathematics, professor of chemistry; John Finn, professor of government; Albert Fry, the E.B. Nye Professor of Chemistry; Peter Patton, the Alan M. Dachs Professor of Science and Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Rex Pratt, the Beach Professor of Chemistry; Michael Roberts, the Robert Rich Professor of Latin and Professor of Classical Studies; Ruth Streigel Weissman, the Walter A. Crowell University Professor of the Social Sciences.

In 2016: Abraham Adzenyah, adjunct professor of music; Philip Bolton, professor of chemistry; Alex Dupuy, professor of sociology; and Mark Slobin, the Winslow-Kaplan Professor of Music.

The faculty, five of whom were present, were honored at a ceremony May 27 at the Wasch Center for Retired Faculty. Photos of the event are below: (Photos by Olivia Drake)

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Wesleyan Emeritus College Offers Theses Supervised by Retired Faculty

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The Wasch Center, located on Lawn Ave., is launching the new Wesleyan Emeritus College this spring.

Starting next fall, the Wasch Center for Retired Faculty will begin a two-year pilot program, “Wesleyan Emeritus College,” to encourage thesis tutorials between undergraduates and retired faculty members.

During this pilot, 11 retired faculty participants have been specifically approved to administer tutorials for credit by their parent departments.

Richard Elphick, professor of history, emeritus, taught at Wesleyan from 1972 to 2015. His interests are African history, comparative imperialism, revolutions, theory of history, and the history of Christianity. “I would be interested in supervising theses focusing on the following areas: History of Christianity, Africa (especially South Africa), imperialism, World War I and II, Cold War,” he said.

Jack Carr, professor of theater, emeritus, worked at Wesleyan from 1984 to 2015. He was the lighting and scene designer for the Theater Department, and a professional designer for productions in New York, the United Kingdom, Bucharest, Romania and Russia. His interests include lighting, design for dance and theater, and theater history. At Wesleyan, he taught Introduction to Production, Lighting Design, Designing for the Computer, and has already advised hundreds of thesis productions.

Firshein’s Book Addresses Ways Viruses, Bacteria Spread

Book by Bill Firshein.

Book by Bill Firshein.

Bill Firshein, the Daniel Ayers Professor of Biology, emeritus, is the author of the book, The Infectious Microbe, published by Oxford University Press in January 2014. Firshein is the founding faculty member of the Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Department.

In The Infectious Microbe, Firshein uses six different critical diseases to illustrate how viruses and bacteria are spread. He discusses the relationship between man and virus, and how to defeat viruses.

The book will help non-scientific readers better understand the issues surrounding the spread of disease.

Thomas Broker ’66, professor of biochemistry at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, described the book as an “engaging journey into the world of pathogens” and a “must-read for everyone concerned with their personal, family and community health and with national and global health policies, or who has simply wondered about the nature of the infectious diseases to which we are all susceptible.”

Order the book online here.

On March 5, the Wasch Center hosted a book-signing party for Firshein, pictured at right.

On March 5, the Wasch Center hosted a book-signing party for Firshein, pictured at right.

Meditation, Travel Literature, Ethnic Cuisine, 1st Amendment Topics of Fall 2013 WILL Courses

WILL uses the talents of current and retired faculty members, and local guest lecturers, to present a set of short, intellectually stimulating and lively courses to area residents.

WILL uses the talents of current and retired faculty members, and local guest lecturers, to present a set of short, intellectually stimulating and lively courses to area residents.

The Wesleyan Institute for Lifelong Learning (WILL) is offering eight short courses and one, all-day program during the Fall 2013 semester.

Enrollment will be open in early August.

WILL uses the talents of current and retired faculty members, and local guest lecturers, to present a set of short, intellectually stimulating and lively courses to area residents. These courses are offered at minimal cost, are not part of a degree-granting program, and are designed to present topics of particular interest to members of the Wesleyan and local communities. Special one-day courses on particular topics will be offered once each semester.

The schedule, instructors, dates, times and costs of the upcoming courses are:

“Full-Day Film Studies” will be taught by Wesleyan film faculty Jeanine Basinger, Steve Collins, Scott Higgins and Marc Longenecker from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 26 at the Center for Film Studies. The cost is $125.

“Mystery Thursdays – Five Character in Search of a Culprit” will be taught by Andrew DeRocco from 7 to 8:30 p.m., Sept. 12, 19, 26, and Oct. 3, 10 at the Wasch Center. The cost is $110.

“The First Amendment” will be taught by John Finn, professor of government, from 6 to 7:30 p.m., Oct. 8, 15, 22 and 29 in the Wasch Center. The cost is $90.

“Degas and Toulouse-Lautrec” will be taught by Rhea Higgins, a visiting instructor, from 4:30 to 6 p.m., Nov. 4, 11, and 18 in the Butterfield Room at the Wasch Center. The cost is $70. 

Dagnall Supports Wasch Center’s Operations, Lifelong Learning Institute

Liz Dagnall, administrative assistant for the Susan B. and William K. Wasch Center for Retired Faculty, oversees the logistical aspects of the center's events.

Q: Liz, what attracted you to Wesleyan and the Wasch Center for Retired Faculty?

A: I so enjoy working in higher ed, Wesleyan seemed like a good place to start. When I learned about the position at the Wasch Center, I immediately thought it would be a good fit since I worked closely with faculty in my last job.

Q: Please describe your role as an administrative assistant.

A: The days can vary greatly. Lately I’ve been busy preparing for the upcoming semester for WILL (the Wesleyan Institute for Lifetime Learning). This entails overseeing the printing and mailing of brochures and managing course enrollments. We’ve also just begun this semester’s Afternoon Lecture Series and will soon resume our Tuesday Film Series. Some days I focus specifically on operations, making sure that all general office business is up to date. There are 13 retired members of the faculty who have offices in the Center, and I work with many of them on a regular basis, supporting their use of technology and providing general support. The physical space of the Center has a welcoming and homey feel to it, and as such, I have some “home-keeping” responsibilities as well… caring for plants, overseeing the kitchen, etc.

Q: The Wasch Center provides a shared intellectual and social community where retirees may continue their engagement with teaching and scholarly activities. What is your role in helping plan Wasch Center programs and special events? Do you attend the events as well?

A: I take care of the logistical aspects of our events, which is one of the responsibilities of the job I most enjoy, and I attend when I can.

Q: What are a few examples of upcoming events, and who generally attend them?

A: We always have a full house for our Afternoon Lecture Series, and we are featuring a variety of lecture topics this semester. Our retired faculty attend regularly, often with their spouses. The audience is a mix of students, faculty, and staff and neighbors and community members.

Q: Who are the key people that you work with in the center?

A: I work closely with the center’s director, Karl Scheibe. And I work with others in the center as projects and requests dictate. I’ve loved getting to know our faculty.

Q: Prior to Wesleyan, what were you doing? How was the transition?

A: Prior to Wesleyan, I was special assistant to the provost at Lesley University in Cambridge, Mass. My husband and I relocated to this area about a year ago, and after we settled, I spent some time being a stay-at-home-mom. Then, a few months ago, I decided I was ready for some part-time work, and our little one certainly seemed ready to be out in the world and around other children. The transition at Wesleyan has gone really well. And the transition in general has been fun. Every day is an adventure when you have a toddler!

Q: Are you also involved in coordinating events or classes for the Wesleyan Institute for Lifelong Learning?

A: Yes, there are many logistical details for both the weekly class and our day-long Saturday Institute that I help to coordinate.

Q: I understand your husband works for Wesleyan’s Dining Services?

A: Yes, my husband Brian is the Executive Chef with Bon Appetit.

Q: What are you hobbies and interests?

A: Outside of work, it’s all about spending time with my family. I love to cook, read and be outdoors. I’m also a Boston sports fanatic. And in the warmer months I try to play tennis at least a couple of times a week.

Memoirs, Germs, Brownstone Topics of Spring WILL Courses

William Firshein, professor emeritus, will teach the course, Germs Are Us, starting April 25.

This spring, students of all ages will have the opportunity to see dinosaur tracks in Connecticut, discuss emerging infections, explore retirement planning options, or examine emotions, traits and institutions that promote healthy psychological functioning.

These course topics, among others, will be taught through The Wesleyan Institute for Lifelong Learning (WILL) this spring.

The course offerings cover the arts, social sciences, literature, science and mathematics. The spring courses include: Legacies in Words: An Introduction to Memoir Writing, Life’s Great Transitions and Four Essential Dialogues, Exploring the Mysteries of Finance, Positive Psychology, Life Is But a Dream, Germs Are Us, Brownstone Stories: Quarries and Dinosaurs.

WILL classes are taken for interest, not for credit.

Institute for Lifelong Learning Offers Non-Credit Classes

Wesleyan has been devoted to liberal learning since its founding in 1831. The Wesleyan Institute for Lifelong Learning is the latest extension of this mission — a dedication to the improvement of human well-being by means of education throughout the course of life.

Students of all ages can benefit from liberal arts-based educational opportunities outside of a formal degree-granting program through the new Wesleyan Institute for Lifelong Learning (WILL).

WILL classes are taken  for interest, not for credit. Classes will be small with an informal atmosphere.

“Everyone in the room–students and teacher–will be engaged in their subject out of pure curiosity,” says Karl Scheibe, director of the Susan B. and William K. Wasch Center for Retired Faculty. “The learning experience is likely to be more intensive than extensive.”

Scheibe, who is overseeing the new institute, says the courses are designed to appeal to Wesleyan alumni, p

Wasch Center Begins Spring Program Series

Guest speaker Ernest Lowrie discussed "The Search for the Historical Origin of the Word CIVILIZATION," during a Wasch Center Program Jan. 27. Founded in 2004, the Susan B. and William K. Wasch Center for Retired Faculty provides a shared intellectual and social community where retirees may continue their engagement with teaching and scholarly activities.

Author and Penn State University Professor Emeritus Ernest Lowrie discussed "The Search for the Historical Origin of the Word CIVILIZATION," during a Wasch Center Program Jan. 27. Founded in 2004, the Susan B. and William K. Wasch Center for Retired Faculty provides a shared intellectual and social community where retirees may continue their engagement with teaching and scholarly activities.

More than 35 people attended Lowrie's talk. Lowrie is the husband of Joyce Lowrie, professor of romance languages and literatures, emerita. He was the first Wasch Center guest speaker of the spring semester.  (Photos by Stefan Weinberger '10)

More than 35 people attended Lowrie's talk. Lowrie is the husband of Joyce Lowrie, professor of romance languages and literatures, emerita. He was the first Wasch Center guest speaker of the spring semester. (Photos by Stefan Weinberger '10)

All programs sponsored by the Wasch Center are open to the public. For more information on upcoming events visit the Wash Center web site.

Reception Honors Recent Retirees

Wesleyan President Michael Roth; Jason Wolfe, professor of biology, emeritus; and Joe Bruno, vice president for academic affairs and provost, professor of chemistry attend a brief presentation during the reception. The event honored Wolfe, Richard Slotkin, Vera Grant, adjunct professor of German studies, emerita; and Gayle Pemberton, professor of English and African American studies, emerita. Grant and Pemberton were unable to attend the event.

Wesleyan President Michael Roth; Jason Wolfe, professor of biology, emeritus; and Joe Bruno, vice president for academic affairs and provost, professor of chemistry attend a brief presentation during the reception. The event honored Wolfe, Richard Slotkin, Vera Grant, adjunct professor of German studies, emerita; and Gayle Pemberton, professor of English and African American studies, emerita. Grant and Pemberton were unable to attend the event.