Tag Archive for Writing at Wesleyan

Writing, Cooks, Books Celebrated at Foodstock

Cookbook author Molly O’Neill speaks on "Writing So They Can Taste It" during Wesleyan's Foodstock May 5. Foodstock was an all-day extravaganza devoted to cooks and books. O'Neill hosted the PBS series "Great Food" and worked as a reporter with The New York Times and as the food columnist for its Sunday magazine. She has twice been nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and is the editor of the Library of America’s anthology American Food Writing.

Book by Writer-in-Residence Reed Nominated for Shirley Jackson Award

Kit Reed

Resident Writer Kit Reed has been nominated for a Shirley Jackson Award. Her book, What Wolves Know, published in spring 2011 by PS Publishing, was nominated in the category of Single Author Collection.

What Wolves Know is a dystopian thriller; a collection of stories, including tales of mothers who are monstrous in their maternalness, families on the brink of implosion, and children mutated by parental pressure. The title story is about a boy raised by wolves who struggles to adapt to the modern world. Reed has published 22 novels and more than 100 short stories. More information about her work is available on her web site.

The Shirley Jackson Awards recognize outstanding achievement in the literature of psychological suspense, horror and the dark fantastic. The awards were established in honor of author Shirley Jackson (1916-1965), who wrote such classic novels as The Haunting of Hill House and We Have Always Lived in the Castle, as well as the famous short story, “The Lottery.”

The 2011 Shirley Jackson Awards will be presented on July 15 at Readercon 23, Conference on Imaginative Literature, in Burlington, Mass.

Willis Receives Winship/PEN New England Book Award

Book by Elizabeth Willis.

Elizabeth Willis, the Shapiro-Silverberg Professor of Creative Writing, professor of English, is the recipient of the 2012 Winship/PEN New England award for her poetry book Address, published by Wesleyan University Press.

The L.L. Winship/PEN New England Award was established by the Boston Globe in 1975 to honor long-time Boston Globe editor Laurence L. Winship. The awards celebrate best works of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction by New England authors.

PEN (Poets/Playwrights, Essayists/Editors, Novelists) New England is an organization of published authors, aspiring writers, and all who love the written word. PEN aims to advance a culture of literature in New England and defend free expression.

Sebastian Junger ’84 is a past recipient of the award for his book, A Death in Belmont.

According to Wesleyan University Press, Address draws us into visible and invisible architectures, into acts of intimate and public address. These poems are concentrated, polyvocal, and sharply attentive to acts of representation; they take personally their politics and in the process reveal something about the way civic structures inhabit the imagination. Poisonous plants, witches, anthems, bees—beneath their surface, we glimpse the fragility of our founding, republican aspirations and witness a disintegrating landscape artfully transformed. If a poem can serve as a kind of astrolabe, measuring distances both cosmic and immediate, temporal and physical, it does so by imaginative, nonlinear means. Here, past and present engage in acts of mutual interrogation and critique, and within this dynamic Willis’s poetry is at once complexly authoritative and searching: “so begins our legislation.”

Jacob Julien Visiting Writer Mueenuddin Speaks at Russell House

Author Daniyal Mueenuddin, the 2012 Jacob Julien Visiting Writer, spoke in Russell House Feb. 15.

Mueenuddin’s first story collection, "In Other Rooms, Other Wonders," was 2010 winner of The Story Prize and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award. His stories have appeared in The New Yorker, Granta, and other periodicals and in Best American Short Stories 2008 (selected by Salman Rushdie) and PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories 2010.

Critic, Novelist, Poets at Writing at Wesleyan Talks

James Kaplan ’73, author of “Frank: The Voice,” spoke at the Russell House Feb. 9. (Photo by NamAnh Ta)

Cultural critic Wayne Koestenbaum, journalist Jane Eisner, poet Yusef Komunyakaa and novelist Amy Bloom are among the speakers featured in the Writing at Wesleyan 2011 Spring Russell House Series.

Author James Kaplan ’73, the Writing Programs’ 2011 Joan Jakobson Visiting Writer, kicked-off the series Feb. 9, followed by MacArthur award winner Sarah Ruhl on Feb. 10.

All events are free and open to the public.

The full list of speakers is below, or online at http://www.wesleyan.edu/writing/distinguished_writers/.

Wednesday, Feb. 16, Memorial Chapel 8 p.m.
The Writing Programs’ 2011 Annie Sonnenblick Lecturer Michael Cunningham is the author of the novels A Home at the End of the World, Flesh and Blood, The Hours (winner of the Pen/Faulkner Award & Pulitzer Prize), and Specimen Days. His latest novel is By Nightfall. He lives in New York.

Bloom ’75 Named to New Writer-in-Residence Position

Amy Bloom '75, appointed as the Kim-Frank Family University Writer in Residence, read from her latest book, Where the God of Love Hangs Out, April 13 in New York City at "A Conversation with Amy Bloom '75 and President Michael Roth '78." The event was sponsored by the Wesleyan Club of New York and the Wesleyan Writing Programs. (Photo by Bill Burkhart)

Amy Bloom ’75, a distinguished writer of novels, short stories, nonfiction, and projects for television, has been named the Kim-Frank Family University Writer in Residence at Wesleyan University. Her appointment takes effect July 1.

Bloom will have an office in the Shapiro Creative Writing Center.

Bloom will enhance Wesleyan’s curricular offerings in writing by offering two courses per year, and she will serve as a senior thesis advisor. She will have an office in the Shapiro Creative Writing Center.

“Amy Bloom is one of the most accomplished writers in the United States today,” says President Michael S. Roth. “Her insight, her creativity, and her deep understanding of the craft of writing will be a great benefit to our students. The writing community at Wesleyan is prolific and strong, and Amy Bloom’s presence will add to that vitality.”

Bloom is the author of two novels, three collections of short stories, and a nonfiction book. She has been a nominee for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her stories have appeared in The Best American Short Stories, Prize Stories: The O. Henry Awards, and numerous anthologies here and abroad.

Poet, Fiction Writer Speak at Distinguished Writers Series

As part of the Writing at Wesleyan Russell House Series, poet Bernadette Mayer spoke and read prose Oct. 14. Mayer is the author of more than two dozen volumes of poetry, including Midwinter Day, Sonnets, The Desires of Mothers to Please Others in Letters, and Poetry State Forest. A former director of the Poetry Project at St. Mark's Church in the Bowery and co-editor of the conceptual magazine 0 to 9, Mayer has been a key figure on the New York poetry scene for decades.

As part of the Distinguished Writers Series at Wesleyan, poet Bernadette Mayer spoke and read prose Oct. 14. Mayer is the author of more than two dozen volumes of poetry, including Midwinter Day, Sonnets, The Desires of Mothers to Please Others in Letters, and Poetry State Forest. A former director of the Poetry Project at St. Mark's Church in the Bowery and co-editor of the conceptual magazine 0 to 9, Mayer has been a key figure on the New York poetry scene for decades.

Mayer's visit was organized by Elizabeth Willis, the Shapiro-Silverberg Associate Professor of Creative Writing, associate professor of English.

Mayer's visit was organized by Elizabeth Willis, the Shapiro-Silverberg Associate Professor of Creative Writing, associate professor of English.

Fiction writer John Brandon spoke on Oct. 21. Brandon is the author of the novel Arkansas and the forthcoming novel The Semester. He is currently the Grisham Writer-in-Residence at University of Mississippi.

Fiction writer John Brandon spoke on Oct. 21. Brandon is the author of the novel Arkansas and the forthcoming novel The Semester. He is currently the Grisham Writer-in-Residence at University of Mississippi.

Brandon's visit was organized by Deb Olin Unferth, assistant professor of English. (Photos by Jeffrey Katzin '10)

Brandon's visit was organized by Deb Olin Unferth, assistant professor of English. (Photos by Jeffrey Katzin '10)

For more information on the Distinguished Writers Series go to: http://www.wesleyan.edu/writing/distinguished_writers/