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Monthly Archive for August, 2009

CaVar Reid '11, a Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow, presents his research proposal July 30 in Fisk Hall. Reid's project is titled "Ain't No Fathers in the Hood: An Ethnography of Incarcerated Black Fatherhood."

CaVar Reid '11, a Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow, presents his research proposal July 30 in Fisk Hall. Reid's project is titled "Ain't No Fathers in the Hood: An Ethnography of Incarcerated Black Fatherhood."

According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, one out of every three black men between the ages 20 and 29 is in prison, on probation or on parole. Of these men, 94 percent are fathers.

English and African American Studies major CaVar Reid ’11 is curious to discover how prison affects a man’s ability to be a father.

“I want to ask them, ‘What were your expectations about your relationships with your children when you were incarcerated? How do you think your incarceration has affected your children? How did you stay involved with your children?’” Reid says.

As a 2009-11 Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow, Reid will have the opportunity to interview incarcerated and former prisoners at the Osborne Association for an independent research project titled “Ain’t No Fathers in the Hood: An Ethnography of Incarcerated Black Fatherhood.” His study will include the interviews, and cite historians, social workers and anthropologists on prison fatherhood.

“With my data I am trying to tell the story of a group of black men who, I would suggest, (more…)

Hughes Fellow Juan Carlo Francisco '11 speaks to Michael Weir, director of the Hughes Program in the Life Sciences, professor of biology, about his project "Comparative Analysis of Ecotype Demarcation Algorithms" during the 2009 Summer Undergraduate Research Poster Presentations July 31 in Exley Science Center. Francisco's advisors were Danny Krizanc, professor of computer science, and Fred Cohan, professor of biology.

Hughes Fellow Juan Carlo Francisco '11 speaks to Michael Weir, director of the Hughes Program in the Life Sciences, professor of biology, about his project "Comparative Analysis of Ecotype Demarcation Algorithms" during the 2009 Summer Undergraduate Research Poster Presentations July 31 in Exley Science Center. Francisco's advisors were Danny Krizanc, professor of computer science, and Fred Cohan, professor of biology.

Hughes Fellow Danielle Mor ’10 speaks about her research titled “Identifying Migration Guidance Factors for Transplanted Neural Stem Cells in the Epileptic Hippocampus." Mor’s advisor is Laura Grabel, the Lauren B. Dachs Professor of Science and Society, professor of biology.

Hughes Fellow Danielle Mor ’10 speaks about her research titled “Identifying Migration Guidance Factors for Transplanted Neural Stem Cells in the Epileptic Hippocampus." Mor’s advisor is Laura Grabel, the Lauren B. Dachs Professor of Science and Society, professor of biology.

(more…)

Anna Shusterman

Anna Shusterman, assistant professor of psychology, received a five-year National Science Foundation grant.

Anna Shusterman, assistant professor of psychology, recently received a five-year, $716,227 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study “The role of language in children’s acquisition of number concepts.” Shusterman will be evaluating 3-to-5-year-old hearing children in her Cognitive Development Laboratory at Wesleyan. She also will be studying deaf and hard-of-hearing children of the same ages who are learning English to try to determine how language delays affect children’s learning of number concepts.

The grant, which begins this year, comes from the National Science Foundation’s Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) program. The program is only available to non-tenured faculty. Researchers may apply a total of three times to the program; Shusterman was awarded the grant on her first application.

“The CAREER Program truly provides NSF’s most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty and demonstrates (more…)

Lesley Xu ’11, front center, and her friends handing out literature and hosting symposiums urging people to take action for solving the climate crisis. (Photo by Roger Darrigrand/Eagle Tribune)

Lesley Xu '11, front center, and her friends handing out literature and hosting symposiums urging people to take action for solving the climate crisis. (Photo by Roger Darrigrand/Eagle Tribune)

Lesley Xu ’11 was featured in a July 25 issue of The Eagle Tribune of North Andover, Mass. for her efforts helping the climate crisis.

Xu and five of her friends from other universities have been biking across Massachusetts for eight weeks handing out literature and hosting symposiums urging people to take action for solving the climate crisis. They knock on doors and ask residents to sign a petition that calls for “100 percent clean electricity” in Massachusetts.

“We want to mobilize the population and take action,” Xu says in the article.

The students said they and other activists want to lower the quantity of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to 350 parts per million. The current portion is 390 parts per million due to industrialization and extensive burning of coal and oil, they said in the article.

Garfield Lindsay Miller '99 is the writer/producer of <em>The Last New Year</em>, which debuted at the Victoria Film Fest as the Canadian Gala Film. (Photo by Kerry Haynes/North Shore Outlook)

Garfield Lindsay Miller '99 is the writer/producer of The Last New Year, which debuted at the Victoria Film Fest as the Canadian Gala Film. (Photo by Kerry Haynes/North Shore Outlook)

Garfield Lindsay Miller ’99 is featured in a July 29 article titled “Dramatic Choices,” published by the BC Local News North Shore Outlook section.

Miller’s filmmaking resume includes co-writing and producing the award-winning and Gemini-nominated documentary The Fires that Burn about Sister Elaine MacInnes and co-writing Stone’s Throw, an award-winning dramatic feature film set in Nova Scotia – among many other film credits. Most recently, Miller, who is back living in British Columbia, was voted one of the top 20 Top Canadian Film Makers by a jury of his peers.

Miller’s new feature film, The Last New Year, which recently debuted at the Victoria Film Fest as the Canadian Gala Film, has already garnered rave reviews. The film explores the relationships between a group of friends who made a pact in high school to get together each New Year’s Eve.

The online article mentions how Miller transferred to Wesleyan to study English and play baseball. He signed up for the History of World Cinema and worked as a TA in Wesleyan’s Film Studies Department.

“I realized film had the potential to be an art form – I’d never realized that before, I always just though of it as entertainment,” he says in the article. “It was there that I (really) discovered film. I took more film (classes) than English (classes).”

After graduation, he returned to B.C. and got a job on a local tech TV show and wrote a screenplay, according to the article.

Christian Hoyos ’11 works with a 3-year-old during an experiment on sharing behavior during a summer internship at the Social Cognitive Development Lab at Yale University.

Christian Hoyos '11 works with a 3-year-old during an experiment on sharing behavior during a summer internship at the Social Cognitive Development Lab at Yale University.

For 10 weeks, Eve Mayberger ’10 removed harmful matting of two Everett Shinn illustrations, conserved a William de Leftwich Dodge oil painting from 1916, X-rayed a basket made entirely of burrs and cleaned and documented an outdoor statue made of earthenware.

As a recipient of a Wesleyan University Summer Experience Grant, Mayberger had the opportunity to get hands-on experience at the Smithsonian American Art Museum-Lunder Conservation Center where she worked 40 hours a week, unpaid, as an art conservation intern.

The Summer Experience Grants are available to undergraduates who have completed their sophomore year. Awards are made up to $4,000 per experience to interns who work full-time for a minimum of eight weeks and are receiving need-based financial aid.

As a frosh, Mayberger, an art history major (more…)

Drummer/composer Tyshawn Sorey will take an extended break to study composition with “avant-garde avatar” Anthony Braxton, professor of music, in a master’s program at Wesleyan.

According to a July 2009 article in Time Out New York, Sorey shares an earnest, seeking quality with Braxton, who also has upset convention, particularly in terms of what kind of music African-Americans schooled in jazz are supposed to make.

“Quiet as it’s been kept,” Sorey says, “people would tell me to my face that this is not like ‘real’ black music. To me, it’s a very serious problem.”

Sorey has had stints with headstrong leaders like Dave Douglas and Steve Coleman, saxophonist Steve Lehman and pianist Vijay Iyer.

Angel Gil-Ordóñez is the director of the Classical

Angel Gil-Ordóñez is the director of the Post-Classical Ensemble in Washington DC. (Photo by Tom Wolff)

With a boost from National Endowment for the Arts, Angel Gil-Ordóñez’s Washington DC-based orchestra will continue making music for seasons to come.

Gil-Ordóñez, music director of the Wesleyan Orchestra, adjunct professor of music, director of private lessons, chamber music and ensembles, learned that his Post-Classical Ensemble received a $50,000 grant from The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). The award is made possible through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

“We are still jumping for joy,” Gil-Ordóñez says. “It is such an honor, and reassurance that the NEA and the Recovery Act consider that our work must be assured continuity.”

Gil-Ordóñez and artist (more…)

New book by Jelle Zeilinga de Boer.

New book by Jelle Zeilinga de Boer.

Jelle Zeilinga de Boer, the Harold T. Stearns Professor of Earth Science emeritus, is the author of Stories in Stone: How Geology Influenced Connecticut History and Culture published by Wesleyan University Press in July 2009.

In the 228-paged book, geoscientist Zeilinga de Boer describes how early settlers discovered and exploited Connecticut’s natural resources. Their successes as well as failures form the very basis of the state’s history: Chatham’s gold played a role in the acquisition of its Charter, and Middletown’s lead helped the colony gain its freedom during the Revolution. Fertile soils in the Central Valley fueled the state’s development into an agricultural power house, and iron ores discovered in the western highlands helped trigger its manufacturing eminence. The Statue of Liberty, a quintessential symbol of America, rests on Connecticut’s Stony Creek granite. Geology not only shaped the state’s physical landscape, but also provided an economic base and played a cultural role by inspiring folklore, paintings, and poems.

Illuminated by 50 illustrations and 12 color plates, Stories in Stone describes the marvel of Connecticut’s geologic diversity and also recounts the impact of past climates, earthquakes, and meteorites on the lives of the people who made Connecticut their home.

The book is available online from The University Press of New England.

Tsampikos Kottos, assistant professor of physics; Moritz Hiller, a former visiting scientist; and Katrina Smith-Mannshott BA ’08, MA ’09 are the co-authors of the article, “Occupation Statistics of a BEC for a Driven Landau-Zener Crossing,” published in Physical Review Letters, Issue 102, in 2009.

Malik Ben-Salahuddin '13 and Dorisol Inoa '13 are both recent alumni of A Better Chance (ABC). They will attend Wesleyan in the fall.

Malik Ben-Salahuddin '13 and Dorisol Inoa '13 are both recent alumni of A Better Chance (ABC). They will attend Wesleyan in the fall.

Next fall, Wesleyan will welcome two students of color who graduated high school “capable of assuming positions of responsibility and leadership.”

Malik Ben-Salahuddin ’13 and Dorisol Inoa ’13 are both recent alumni of A Better Chance (ABC), the oldest national organization of its kind. ABC aims to change the life trajectory in a positive way for academically-talented youth of color through access to rigorous and prestigious educational opportunities for students in grades 6-12.

“This is wonderful recognition for these two top students, two in a long line of ABC students at Wesleyan,” says Nancy Meislahn, dean of admission and financial aid.

ABC’s mission is to increase substantially the number of well-educated young people of color who are capable of assuming positions of responsibility (more…)

The Center for Creative Youth held a college fair inside the Patricelli '92 Theater July 27.

The Center for Creative Youth held a college fair inside the Patricelli '92 Theater July 27.

(more…)

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