Faculty

Slotkin’s Book “No Quarter” Praised

No Quarter, the new book Richard Slotkin, Olin Professor of English Emeritus, recounts a tragic Union blunder during the Civil War at Petersburg, Virginia, that cost the lives of thousands of soldiers. The plan and its execution was damned in part because the Union troops were “incompetently led and ill prepared.” Slotkin not only explores the tactics and implementation of the plan, but the broad political implications generated in the wake of its failure. The reviewer in The Boston Globe, Michael Kenney, says the book is among” the first rank of Civil War histories.”

Basinger Talks About ‘Julie and Julia’

Jeanine Basinger, Chair and Cowrin-Fuller Professor of Film Studies, Curator, Cinema Archives, discusses the new film Julie and Julia, which is about the life of famed Chef Julia Child and a writer Julie Powell, who decides to try to cook every recipe in Child’s best-selling cookbook, Mastering the Art of French Cooking, and then blog about her experiences. Among the movie’s producers is Lawrence Mark ’71.

Swinehart: “American Heroes” is the ‘Real Deal’

Kirk Swinehart, assistant professor of history, has a reivew for The Chicago Tribune of Edmund Morgan’s latest book, American Heroes: Profiles of Men and Women Who Shaped Early America. Swinehart says: “as so many times before, Morgan proves himself one of our deftest thinkers about race — what he once called ‘the American paradox, the marriage of slavery and freedom.'”

McAlister on What Revolution Sounds Like

Elizabeth McAlister, professor of religion, associate professor of African American studies, associate professor of American Studies, continues her participation in a round table on Haitian culture in The New Yorker, discussing the music of revolution in Haiti and why it is so important within the culture.

Burke Receives $395,000 from NSF, $100,000 from NIH

Ann Burke, associate professor of biology, recently received a three-year, $395,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study the development and evolution of the shoulder girdle using transgenic mice, frog and salamander. The mice will be generated in collaboration with a lab at the University of Michigan and will allow Burke and her associates to turn off Hox genes, which are specific patterning genes, in specific sub populations of the embryonic mesoderm that make the musculoskeletal tissues. Comparing the dynamics of gene expression and cell interactions during the formation of the pectoral region in a variety of embryos will help Burke and other scientists understand the evolution of these musculoskeletal structures and the dramatic variations among vertebrate lineages associated with adaptations for different locomotor strategies, like swimming, scurrying, crawling and flying.

Burke also received a two-year $100,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to use the same amphibian systems (salamander and frog) to develop a model system for understanding body wall defects in humans.