Tag Archive for media

Wesleyan Featured For Email Partnership with Google

In a recent piece for NPR’s “All Things Considered” Wesleyan is profiled for it’s strategic shift to Google’s gmail for student accounts. The story quotes Karen Warren, director of user and technical services, who discusses the intent behind the change-over to this  “cloud computing” strategy. Nicholas Marshall ’10 is also quoted.

Green Street Arts Center A ‘Hidden Gem’

WFSB-3, Hartford’s CBS affiliate, recently profiled the after school programming at Green Street Arts Center, Wesleyan’s community arts initiative that provides classes, mentoring, and extensive arts instruction of all sorts to youths in the community.

Dupuy: Haiti Must Create Food Independence

In a report on NPR’s MarketPlace, Alex Dupuy, Class of 1958 Distinguished Professor of Sociology, comments on a United Nations plan to raise and distribute $4 billion of relief funds for Haiti. Dupuy has criticized the Haitian government in the past for settling into a culture of aid instead of trying to build sustainable infrastructure and industry from within. In the report, Dupuy supports the U.N.’s plan to decentralize economic activity, but with caveats that extend to the garment industry and food production.

Roth on Richard Reeves ‘Daring Young Men’

In The San Francisco Chronicle, Wesleyan President Michael S. Roth reviews Daring Young Men: The Triumph of the Berlin Airlift, June 1948-May 1949, a new book by Richard Reeves. The book details one of the seminal moments of the early Cold War chess match between The United States and The Soviet Union as Stalin sought to starve the Western sectors of Berlin into submission. The U.S. responded with an improbable plan to fly into Berlin everything the city’s residents needed to survive. Roth states: “Today, when the United States struggles with two wars only grudgingly supported by some of its citizens, Reeves’ account is a welcome reminder of the importance of a military willing to take risks to preserve freedom. ‘Daring Young Men’ brings to life a moment when altruism, guts and know-how inspired our country and saved a city.”

Dupuy: Aid to Haiti Absolves State of Responsibilities

Alex Dupuy, Class of 1958 Distinguish Professor of Sociology, discusses for CNN the ‘vicious cycle’ that has gripped Haiti: the country’s dependency on foreign and charitable aid has become so pronounced over the years that it has restrained the Haitian government from facing up to long-term solutions to basic problems. Because so much of the Haitian economy – and in a post-disaster situation, the current rebuilding – is shaped by foreign and NGO aid-driven agendas, educated Haitianoften decide to leave the county for better economic conditions rather than to work for the government or Haitian-owned and based businesses.

Dupuy has been invited by UNESCO (The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) to a conference on March 24 at their Paris headquarters titled: “Refonder le tissue social, culturel, et intellectuel d’Haiti” (Rebuilding the Social, Cultural, and Intellectual Fabric of Haiti). The conference is a preparation for another conference between the Haitian government and their major international aid donors that will be held a week later in New York City.

Greenwood: Lunar Water May Have Come from Comets

CBS News, and National Geographic among others, report on a presentation by James Greenwood, research associate professor, visiting assistant professor, earth and environmental sciences, at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in Texas where he outlined two stunning scenarios: 1) Water is present in the moon rocks that were collected by the Apollo astronauts; 2) The water did not come from the earth; it may, in fact, have come from comets. Greenwood’s research, using a new technique he pioneered, yielded both bits of information. His study is currently under review by Science. Greenwood’s findings have also been reported in Discover Magazine, The Houston Press New Scientist, Fox News and MSNBC via Space.com, and AOL News,

Milroy on Philadelphia’s Rockland Mansion

In a recent issue of The Philadelphia Inquirer, Elizabeth Milroy, interim co-chair and professor of art and art history, professor of American studies, commented on Fairmount Park’s Rockland Mansion, a historic, but until recently little-noticed, landmark in the city. Milroy will be presenting a talk at the Rockland Mansion on March 13 (for more information call 215-235-2345).

Murphy ’10 Featured on “Morning Edition”

Andrew C. Murphy ’10 was featured in a report on NPR’s “Morning Edition” that examined the work of his mother, pediatric neurologist, Frances Jensen. Jensen, who is on the staff at Children’s Hospital in Boston and Harvard University, began to investigate teen aged behavior when her son, Andrew seemed to become a completely different person as he entered his teen years. Her findings have contributed to the new understanding about the function and formation of teen brains.

Daniel Long on the Earthquake in Chile

Daniel Long, assistant professor of sociology, spoke to Channel 8 about the earthquake in Chile and his family in the country. Long said that while the loss of life and damage is substantial, the country has dramatically improved its preparedness and infrastructure for such an event since a large quake struck the South American nation in 1960.

Pomper on His New Book: ‘Lenin’s Brother’

Philip Pomper, William Armstrong Professor of History, is interviewed by The History News Network regarding his new book, Lenin’s Brother. Pomper discusses the process of researching and writing the book, as well as the prominence and historical significance of Lenin’s older brother Alexander Ulyanov, also known as ‘Sasha.’

Rutland: Obama’s ‘Reset’ with Russia Failing

In a recent opinion piece for The Moscow Times, Peter Rutland, professor of government, Colin and Nancy Campbell Professor in Global Issues and Democratic Thought, says that, despite a good start, the much publicized “reset” with Russia enacted by The Obama Administration has ground to a halt. Rutland discusses the reasons for this, including some miscalculations and questions as to what kind of relationship Russia wants to have with the U.S.