In the Media

Roth on Goldhagen’s ‘Worse Than War’

Wesleyan President Michael S. Roth reviewed Daniel Goldhagen’s Worse Than War: Genocide, Eliminationism, and the the Ongoing Assault on Humanity recently for The San Francisco Chronicle. In the book, Goldhagen attempts to show that  “that genocide is an extension of the politics of ‘eliminationism,’ which is decisively shaped by political leaders and fueled by profound and widely shared hatred. However, Roth found Goldhagen simple-minded in many of his conclusions and proposed solutions.

Villinski Exhibit at Zilkha Gallery Lauded

“Emergency Response Studio” a mobile exhibit constructed in response to the Hurricane Katrina disaster in 2006 by Paul Villinski, reviewed recently by The New York Times, is on display outside the Ezra and Cecille Zilkha Gallery until Nov. 8. The exhibit began as a mobile studio that would allow Villinski to create art in hurricane-ravaged New Orleans. It became a de facto piece of performance art in itself as Villinski’s built an environmentally friendly mobile living space for the same price as the mobile emergency trailers FEMA provided, and with none of the toxic side effects.

Wesleyan Sukkah Wins Architectural Award

The Wesleyan Sukkah, a structure created by the 15 students enrolled in Architecture II and working in the Wesleyan research-design-build studio, has won a 2009 “Faith and Form Award” from the American Institute of Architects (AIA). The students are supervised by Elijah Huge, assistant professor of art.

Potter Cited in “Sommers vs. Romulus” Debate

Claire Potter, professor of history, professor of American studies, is cited in the on-going discussion that has been churning for a few months in literary circles regarding American Enterprise Institute scholar Christina Hoff Sommers, a frequent critic of academic feminism, who believes, according to The New Yorker, that many feminist scholars are ” ‘impervious to reasoned criticism’ (she thinks they take things way too personally, and, consumed with effrontery, are unable to correct themselves).” This included Sommers’ critique of particular scholar’s assertion that abuse began with the fabled founder of Rome, Romulus and a massive digression on whether such a person ever existed. However, it is a quote by Potter that brings the discussion back to the cogent point, as well as reality.

McAlister on What Revolution Sounds Like

Elizabeth McAlister, professor of religion, associate professor of African American studies, associate professor of American Studies, continues her participation in a round table on Haitian culture in The New Yorker, discussing the music of revolution in Haiti and why it is so important within the culture.