Tag Archive for Jeff Rider

Rider a Royal Flemish Academy Fellow in Brussels

Jeff Rider, professor of romance languages and literatures, professor of  medieval studies, has received a residential fellowship from the Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium for Science and the Arts in Brussels for the second semester of the 2011-12 academic year.

Jeff Rider

Rider is in Brussels working with two other fellows on the topic, “Perception and Performance of Social Identity in the Nascent Urban Societies of the High Middle Ages.” In addition to presenting a lecture to other fellows at the center, he’s presenting lectures at the University of Ghent, the Catholic University of Louvain, the Royal Library of Belgium, the Charles University in Prague, and to a European research group (Interfaces: The Integration of Latin and Vernacular in a New History of European Medieval Literature) in Rome.

Rider also is at work this semester on an edition of the most important medieval Flemish chronicle, Ancient Chronicle of Flanders, which will be published by the Royal Historical Commission of Belgium.

Rider Co-Edits Book on Women in Medieval Romance Literature

Book co-edited by Jeff Rider.

Jeff Rider, professor of Romance languages and literatures, professor of medieval studies, is the co-editor of the book The Inner Life of Women in Medieval Romance Literature: Grief, Guilt and Hypocrisy, published by Palgrave Macmillan: New York, 2011.

The essays explore medieval, romance emotional communities through both fictional and non-fictional narratives in French, Spanish and Italian texts ranging from the 12th through 15th centuries. By following these women characters in their considerations, readers can hope both to learn something about the times the women were writing in, while to enriching and enlarging their own “emotionologies.”

More information on the book is available online.

‘War’ Topic of Ongoing Humanities’ Lecture Series

Sally Bachner, assistant professor of English, spoke on “Rape Trauma, Combat Trauma, and the Making of PTSD: Feminist Fiction in the 1970s” Feb. 15 in the Russell House. Bachner's talk was part of the ongoing Center for the Humanities Spring Lecture Series on "War." (Photo by Stefan Weinberger '10)

Sally Bachner, assistant professor of English, spoke on “Rape Trauma, Combat Trauma, and the Making of PTSD: Feminist Fiction in the 1970s” Feb. 15 in the Russell House. Bachner's talk was part of the ongoing Center for the Humanities Spring Lecture Series on "War." (Photo by Stefan Weinberger '10)

In the 1970s, veterans, activists and psychiatrists were hard at work getting the disorder that came to be called post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) included in the upcoming edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders III. During the same period, feminists were building a successful anti-rape movement that crucially insisted that rape is a form of violence.

On Feb. 15, Sally Bachner, assistant professor of English, spoke on “Rape Trauma, Combat Trauma, and the Making of PTSD: Feminist Fiction in the 1970s” during the Center for the John E. Sawyer Spring Lecture Series on War.

The public is invited to all CHUM lectures. (Photo by Stefan Weinberger '10)

The public is invited to all CHUM lectures. (Photo by Stefan Weinberger '10)

Bachner proposed that while both of these groups sought to bring suffering – of combat veterans and rape victims, respectively – into speech, many feminist novelists of this period instead turn to the figure of the soldier to figure rape as unspeakable. PTSD functions in these texts as a technology for figuring what was initially conceived of as suppressed speech about violence against women as a putatively “unspeakable” trauma.

Bachner, who is currently completing a book on violence in contemporary American fiction titled, The Prestige of Violence: American Fiction, 1962-2002, is among a dozen guests speaking in CHUM’s ongoing lecture series. Past topics this spring include robots and war, the war between international law and politics, U.S. foreign policy with Iraq and Afghanistan and war and the nation. Most recently, Trevor Paglen, artist and