Campus News & Events

Matesan Speaks at Meeting with Policymakers in Switzerland

From left, Assistant Professor of Government Ioana Emy Matesan, Imelda Deinla, Clark Lombardi and moderator, Mimmi Söderberg Kovacs on a panel discussion with policymakers on conflict resolution.

From left, Assistant Professor of Government Ioana Emy Matesan, Imelda Deinla, Clark Lombardi, and moderator Mimmi Söderberg Kovacs in a panel discussion with policymakers on conflict resolution.

On Sept. 29–Oct. 1, Assistant Professor of Government Ioana Emy Matesan traveled to Switzerland to participate in a research workshop that brought together an international and interdisciplinary group of scholars working on conflict and violence, as well as in a meeting with policymakers.

Matesan was one of only six researchers from five different countries invited to attend the meeting with policymakers—primarily from the Human Security Division within the Swiss Department of Foreign Affairs—which was organized by the Folke Bernadotte Academy (the Swedish government agency for peace, security, and development), the Department of Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University, the Center for Security Studies in Zurich, and the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs of Switzerland.

Matesan participated in a panel discussion on resolving conflicts involving Islamist actors, along with Imelda Deinla, the director of the Philippines Project at Australian National University, and Clark Lombardi, the director of Islamic legal studies at the University of Washington.

Ioana Emy Matesan

Ioana Emy Matesan

“The panel was centered on the question of what research can tell us about the prospects of conflict resolution, and what questions it raises for policymakers and practitioners who want to engage in negotiations and mediation,” said Matesan. “In my comments I drew on my research on Egypt and Indonesia to emphasize that group ideology and tactics can change over time in response to internal dynamics and public condemnation, but I also warned against policies that use overwhelming force, and the assumption that either groups or publics are passive recipients of propaganda with little agency.”

Kiman Speaks on Klezmer Music during Graduate Speaker Series

On Oct 10, Douglas Kiman, a Ph.D student in ethnomusicology, presented a Graduate Speaker Series talk on" Klezmorim and Klezmer Music: From Europe to the United States and Back Again."

On Oct 10, Douglas Kiman, a second year PhD student in ethnomusicology, presented a Graduate Speaker Series talk titled “Klezmorim and Klezmer Music: From Europe to the United States and Back Again.” Klezmer music is the instrumental folklore of Eastern European Yiddish-speaking communities played by Jewish musicians called klezmorim. For centuries, these musicians traveled with their music, playing for the nobles and for the masses, within and outside their communities, adapting and absorbing from their surrounding cultures.

Wesleyan in the News

In this recurring feature in The Wesleyan Connection, we highlight some of the latest news stories about Wesleyan and our alumni.

Recent Wesleyan News

  1. The New York Times: “Why Half a Degree of Global Warming Is a Big Deal”

Gary Yohe, the Huffington Foundation Professor of Economics and Environmental Studies, comments on a new report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a group with which he was involved from the early 1990s through 2014.

2. Avant Music News: “Tyshawn Sorey Residency at the Kitchen”

On Oct. 21–23, Tyshawn Sorey MA ’11, assistant professor of music; assistant professor, African American studies; will present a rare three-night New York City appearance in a residency at The Kitchen in Chelsea with a variety of musicians.

Faculty, Alumna Celebrate the Publication of Their New Russian Literature Books

Priscilla Meyer, Katherine Lahti ’81 and Susanne Fusso celebrated their new book publications at the Wesleyan RJ Julia Bookstore on Oct. 11. (Photo by Joe Siry)

Two faculty and an alumna celebrated the publication of their new books during a gathering Oct. 11 at the Wesleyan RJ Julia Bookstore.

All three books focus on Russian literature and culture and were recently published by Northwestern University Press.

Wesleyan Receives Major Grant to Teach Hindi and Urdu, Expand South Asian Programming

The annual Navaratri Festival is an example of Wesleyan’s long-time commitment to South Asian cultural programming.

Wesleyan has received a two-year $165,699 grant under the U.S. Department of Education’s Undergraduate International Studies and Foreign Language (UISFL) program to support the teaching of Hindi and Urdu, the research of STEM faculty and students in India, and the increase of cultural programming related to South Asia.

“This grant will allow Wesleyan to become one of a very small number of liberal arts institutions in the country with classroom instruction in Hindi and Urdu,” said Stephen Angle, director of the Fries Center for Global Studies. “We are excited about the ability this grant will give us to support STEM faculty and students doing summer research in India as a way of growing opportunities for international experiences in the sciences. Together with our existing faculty strength in South Asian studies (currently nine faculty across the arts, humanities, and social sciences) and the president’s initiative to expand Wesleyan’s visibility in India, the new grant will help to further solidify Wesleyan as a leader in South Asian studies.”

Slotkin Authors New Book of Semifictional Stories

Richard Slotkin, Olin Professor of English, Emeritus, is the author of a new book, Greenhorns: stories, published Oct. 10 by Leapfrog Press.

Slotkin writes more personally in Greenhorns than in his past nonfiction books, in a series of linked semifictional stories based on his ancestors’ immigration from Eastern Europe early in the 20th century.

A kosher butcher with gambling problems; a woman whose elegant persona conceals unspeakable horror; a Jewish Pygmalion who turns a wretched orphan into a “real American girl”; a boy who clings to his father’s old-world code of honor on the mean streets of Brooklyn; the “little man who wasn’t there,” whose absence reflects his family’s inability to deal with their memories—these tales of early 20th-century Jewish immigration blur memoir and fiction, recovering the violent circumstances, the emotional costs of uprooting that left people uncertain of their place in America and shaped the lives of their American descendants.

Kauanui Presents Paper at Decolonizing Anarchisms Conference

J. Kehaulani Kauanui

J. Kehaulani Kauanui

J. Kēhaulani Kauanui, professor and chair of American studies, recently presented her research at a conference in Loughborough University on Decolonizing Anarchisms. The gathering was the fifth annual conference of the UK Anarchist Studies Network.

The purpose of the conference was “to stimulate discussion of colonialism and racism as forms of oppression that anarchists oppose, but which continue to be felt in anarchist organizing; and to welcome individuals, groups and communities who have not previously participated in ASN events. By recognizing the legacy of non-western and anti-colonial thought and action in the anarchist tradition, we want to strengthen the ties between contemporary anarchists and decolonial theory and practice in the struggle against oppression, and to use the recognition of racist and Eurocentric practices and mind-frames to open up the event to marginalized groups.”

Kauanui’s paper, “Anarchist and the Politics of Indigeneity and Sovereignty in Settler Colonial Context,” distinguished a diversity of anarchist practices to clarify common misunderstandings about indigenous nationalism often held by nonindigenous people in order to offer some initial thoughts on bringing together an indigenous sovereignty politic in relation to anarchist philosophy and activism.

Badr ’20 Named UN Young Leader for Sustainable Development Goals

Ahmed Badr ’20 was one of 17 young people appointed by the UN to serve as Young Leaders for the Sustainable Development Goals. They were selected from over 8,000 applicants from 184 countries, based on their “proven leadership and ability to inspire others.” Badr, holding the sign, at left, is pictured at the UN General Assembly in September.

The United Nations has named Ahmed Badr ’20 to the 17 Young Leaders for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), class of 2018. The UN Young Leaders, a flagship initiative of the Office of the Secretary-General’s Envoy on Youth, recognizes young people for their exceptional leadership and contributions to a more sustainable world.

“It’s an absolute pleasure and privilege to be selected for this program,” said Badr, who is the second youngest UN Young Leader ever and the only Iraqi and American in this year’s class. “It’s an immense honor and responsibility to be a representative of these multiple identities and communities. Above all, it’s an exciting avenue to advocate for the world’s young people, regardless of their nationality or background.”

Badr is a junior at Wesleyan, studying anthropology and pursuing independent projects as an Allbritton Fellow and Patricelli Center Fellow. He was born in Iraq and in 2008 came to the United States as a refugee, after his family’s home in Baghdad was bombed by militia troops.

2018 Homecoming Game Features Cardinals vs. Amherst on Oct. 20

Come home to Wesleyan for the annual Homecoming celebration on Oct. 20. Cheer on the Cardinals as Wesleyan takes on Little Three rival Amherst College during this year’s Homecoming game.

Other highlights include:

  • Athletics Hall of Fame Ceremony and Dinner
  • Alumni Volunteer Leaders Meeting
  • Team Tailgates hosted by baseball, men’s basketball, women’s basketball, football, lacrosse, softball, and swimming and diving.
  • Reception Honoring Leadership Donors and Volunteers
  • Alpha Delta Phi Reception and Banquet Dinner
  • Guided Gallery Tour: Kahlil Robert Irving Exhibition

Events begin on Friday, Oct. 19 with campus tours and a Wesleyan Admission information session.

View the entire schedule online here.

Athletic Contests, WESeminars, and Other Highlights of 2018 Family Weekend

Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19 shares a hug with her parents, Leslie Goldfarb Terry and Al Terry, who visited from Brooklyn, N.Y., during Family Weekend 2018. Leslie and Al enjoy attending WESeminars. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

More than 2,000 parents, family members, friends, and alumni attended Family Weekend 2018 Sept. 28–30 on campus. Activities included campus tours, WESeminar lectures, panel discussions, performances, a Wesleyan Summer Grants showcase, an Alumni and Student of Color Celebration, the 8th Annual Stone A Cappella Concert, the 26th Annual Dwight L. Greene Symposium presenting “Black Phoenix Rising,” and much more.

In Family Weekend athletic news, all four home contests (football, field hockey, and men’s and women’s soccer) saw hard-fought battles against Hamilton. Hamilton blocked a Wesleyan punt and recovered it in the end zone with just 1:34 to play in regulation as the Continentals stunned the Cardinals, 33-29. Men’s and women’s soccer were both forced into overtime, with the women earning a 1–1 draw, and the men falling 1–0. Field hockey fell by one goal, 2–1, to the 14th-ranked Continentals.

Men’s crew opened up its fall season with a first-place finish in the Collegiate Open 8, taking home the Muncie Cup at the Head of the Riverfront in Hartford, Conn. Volleyball won its second consecutive Little Three Championship following a 3–0 sweep over archival Amherst, and remain perfect in NESCAC play with a 5–0 mark. The women’s cross country team placed 8th of 43 teams at the 45th Annual Paul Short Run, with Becky Lopez-Anido ’21 crossing the finish line 30th of 363 runners. Golf placed 8th at the NESCAC Championship Qualifier. In men’s tennis on Sept. 30, Peter Anker ’22 led the way for Wesleyan at the ITA Regional Championships in Middlebury, Vt., making the quarterfinals in doubles alongside Zach Fleischman ’21 as well as winning a pair of singles matches to make the third round. Victoria Yu ’19 and her sister, Kristina Yu ’22, came away with a winning 6–4, 6–3 win at the New England ITA Regional Doubles Championship.

This weekend, Wesleyan Athletics also collaborated with the Headway Foundation to raise awareness about concussions.

View a selection of images below, or visit the full Family Weekend photo album on Wesleyan Flickr. (Photos by Olivia Drake, Tom Dzimian, Jonas Powell ’18, Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19, and Caroline Kravitz ’19. Additional info provided by Cynthia Rockwell and Mike O’Brien.)

Mary Falls P’22 came in from Nashville, Tenn., to visit son Christopher Falls ’22. The two enjoyed a fire-spinning performance, as well as the WESeminar, “Civic Engagement and Social Entrepreneurship Workshop.” Christopher, a prospective physics major, is the nephew of the late David Mariani ’77, who was a student of Foss Professor of Physics Tom Morgan.

Volleyball Wins 2nd Consecutive Little 3 Title

The Cardinals claimed the Little Three title for the second year in a row and third all-time. (Photo by Jonas Powell ’18)

Wesleyan’s volleyball team won its second consecutive Little Three Championship Sept. 30 following a 3-0 sweep over archrival Amherst College on the road. The Cardinals (10-2) remain perfect in NESCAC play with a 5-0 mark. Shortly after, they saw their 10-match win streak come to an end as they fell to non-conference foe Endicott College, 3-1.

With Wesleyan’s win over Williams earlier this year, 3-1, the Cardinals claim the Little Three title for the second year in a row and third all-time.

Graduate Students, Faculty Attend Yeast Genetics Meeting

From the left is Anna Rogers and Lorencia Chigweshe, both graduate students in the Molecular biology and Biochemistry program.

Graduate students Anna Rogers and Lorencia Chigweshe presented their poster at the GSA meeting.

Two Wesleyan graduate students and two faculty members presented posters at the GSA Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology Meeting held at Stanford University on Aug. 22–26. This meeting, which is held once every two years, is organized by the Genetics Society of America (GSA). The meeting brings together hundreds of scientists making groundbreaking discoveries in the field of genetics and gene regulation using the innovative power of yeast genetics.

Both students received a travel grant through Wesleyan’s Melnick Fund to support travel to the conference.

Lorencia Chigweshe presented a poster titled “Interactions between histone variant H2A.Z and linker histone H1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae meiosis,” while Anna Rogers presented “The histone variant H2A.Z promotes chromosome condensation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.” Both students are mentored by Scott Holmes, professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, whose lab investigates how the processes of chromosome segregation and gene expression are regulated in eukaryotes.

“We had the opportunity to engage with experts in the field of yeast genetics and learn from them and get insight on our own work,” Chigweshe said. “The conference was a great opportunity to appreciate yeast as a powerful tool for understanding genetics in addition to its industrial application in beer and bread-making.”

Amy MacQueen, associate professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, associate editor for Genetics, cochaired a workshop on scientific publishing and also presented a poster titled “Synapsis and recombination unite at the Zip1’s N-terminal tip” while Mike McAlear, associate professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, presented “Adjacent gene co-regulation (AGC) as a strategy for transcriptional control and coupling.” McAlear is also associate professor, integrative sciences, and Holmes is also professor, integrative sciences.