Tag Archive for Novick

Novick’s Papers Focus on van der Walls Complex, Trifluoroanisole Water

Stewart Novick

Stewart Novick

Stewart Novick, chair and professor of chemistry, is the co-author of several papers published in 2014. They include:

“The microwave spectra and structure of the argon-cyclopentanone and neon-cyclopentanone van der Waals complexes,” published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry A 118, pages 856-861;

“The shape of trifluoromethoxybenzene,” published in the Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy 297, pages 32-34;

“Fluorination effects on the shapes of complexes of water with ethers: a rotational study of trifluoroanisole-water,” published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry, A 118, pages 1,047-51;

“Measurement of the J = 1 – 0 pure rotational transition in excited vibrational states of X 1Σ Thorium (II) Oxide,” Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy, 302, 1-2;

And “H2 AgCl: a spectroscopic study of a dihydrogen (metal halide complexes with hydrogen) complex,” published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry, 141, 114306.

Novick Published in Several Chemistry Journals

Stewart Novick, chair and professor of chemistry, is the author or co-author of the following publications:

“Probing the chemical nature of dihydrogen complexation to transition metals, a case study: H2—CuF,” published in Inorganic Chemistry, 52, 816-822, 2013.

“Detection of Nitrogen-protonated Nitrous oxide HNNO + by Rotational Spectroscopy,” published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry A, 117, 9968-9974, 2013.

“Rotational spectrum and structure of cyclohexene oxide and the argon-cyclohexene oxide van der Waals Complex,” published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry A 117, 13691-13695, 2013.

“Corrigendum to: “Microwave spectrum and structure of the polar N2O dimer” [Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy 251 (2008) 153-158],” published in the Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy, 2013.

“The microwave spectra and structure of the argon-cyclopentanone and neon-cyclopentanone van der Waals complexes,” published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry A, 2014.

“The shape of trifluoromethoxybenzene,” published in the Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy, 297, 32-34, 2014.

“Fluorination effects on the shapes of complexes of water with ethers: a rotational study of trifluoroanisole-water,” published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry A, 118, 1047-1051 in 2014.

NSF Supports Novick’s Chemistry Research

Stewart Novick, professor of chemistry, received a grant worth $43,260 from the National Science Foundation. The award is shared with Professor Stephen Cooke of SUNY-Purchase and represents a new collaboration between Professors Cooke and Novick who now co-mentor graduate students and share sophisticated equipment (Fourier transform microwave spectrometers housed in Novick’s lab at Wesleyan). The collaboration, which goes beyond this one grant, involves investigating the structures and dynamics of a whole range of systems including large halogenated compounds and molecules involving actinide valence electrons in their chemical bonding.

NSF Supports Pickett’s, Novick’s Spectroscopy Research

Stewart Novick, professor of chemistry, and Herb Pickett, a visiting scholar in chemistry, received a $323,880 grant from the National Science Foundation for their research titled “High resolution spectroscopy of molecular hydrogen complexed with Transition metal halides and chalcogens: a model for H2 MOF hydrogen storage.” The grant will be awarded Sept. 1 through Aug. 31, 2013. The grant is subcontract with the project’s co-PI Zhenghong Yu at Aerodyne Research Inc.

Using the extremely sensitive Fourier transform microwave spectrometer in Novick’s laboratory and incorporating “laser ablation” as a source of refractory molecules, Novick and Pickett plan to study the “active site” of the metal organic frameworks (MOF) binding site to molecular hydrogen. These MOFs can be used to safely transport hydrogen, for example in hydrogen fuel-cell driven automobiles.

“Perhaps we will ultimately learn how to design a better MOF for hydrogen transport,” Novick says.

Novick and Pickett will explore the chemical nature of bonding between H2 and its various binding partners such as ZnO, CuO, CuF, and other transition metal halides and chalcogens (oxygen and sulfur), which we will denote by MX.

“The investigation of the structure and dynamics of these medium strength complexes will enable us to elucidate the influence of the electronic structure of the transition metal halides and chalcogens upon the bond strength of these molecules with molecular hydrogen,” Novick explains. “We will also obtain detailed information on the anisotropy of the bonding of the MX with H2. The complexes will be produced by a laser ablation source immediately following supersonic expansion of a dilute mixture of hydrogen and an inert gas.”

These experimental and theoretical investigations will reveal important structural, energetic and dynamical information which should provide detailed insights into what further modification of MOFs will be required for hydrogen storage at room temperature.