Tag Archive for WESeminar

Documents by Hamilton, Washington Explored during “Hidden Treasures” WESeminar

hidden treasures

On Aug. 18, Wesleyan faculty, staff, and alumni gathered via Zoom to present a WESeminar titled “Hidden Treasures.” Pictured, from top, left, is H. Richard Dietrich III ’92, president of the Dietrich American Foundation; Molly McGonigle, assistant director of alumni and parent relations; and Demetrius Eudell, professor of history and dean of Wesleyan’s Social Sciences Division. Pictured from bottom, left, is Suzy Taraba, director of Special Collections and Archives, and Morrie Heckscher ’62, curator emeritus of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Taraba served as the event’s moderator.

On Aug. 18, Wesleyan faculty, staff, and alumni presented a WESeminar titled “Hidden Treasures.”

The seminar focused on the holdings of the Dietrich American Foundation on long-term loan at Wesleyan, which includes letters, writings, and manuscripts by Alexander Hamilton, Benjamin Franklin, and George Washington, among others. All documents are available to Wesleyan students and faculty through Wesleyan’s Special Collections and Archives.

“One of the hallmarks of the experience of studying at a liberal arts college is the opportunity to interact directly with material objects of the past—documents, rare books, artworks, cultural objects—in ways that are often only reserved for graduate students and faculty at other institutions,” said the event’s moderator Suzy Taraba, director of Special Collections and Archives.

Guest speakers included H. Richard Dietrich III ’92, president of the Dietrich American Foundation; Morrie Heckscher ’62, curator emeritus of the Metropolitan Museum of Art; and Demetrius Eudell, professor of history and dean of Wesleyan’s Social Sciences Division. Richard Dietrich’s father, H. Richard Dietrich II ’60, was the founder of the Dietrich American Foundation and initiated the loan to Wesleyan.

The WESeminar concluded with a Q&A session with participants.

View of Wesleyan University, Middletown, 1830s sperm whale tooth, engraved. Points to his love of Wesleyan , collecting at a young age.

Richard Dietrich ’92 spoke about this engraved sperm whale tooth, which depicts a scene of Wesleyan University in the 1830s. The object is part of the Dietrich American Foundation collection.

Dietrich shared a letter written in 1796 by Alexander Hamilton to Connecticut Delegate Jeremiah Wadsworth. The letter urges Wadsworth to rally against Thomas Jefferson.

banner music

Dietrich also showcased the collection’s copy of Francis Scott Key’s sheet music for the “Star Spangled Banner” written in 1815. It is among only four known copies to exist in the country and is housed at Wesleyan. “It’s visually appealing and in great shape for something this old,” Dietrich said.

Demetrius Eudell showed examples of Dietrich Foundation documents that he's used in teaching seminars on war and race relations. This 1796 document written and signed by George Washington and James McHenry titled "Talk of the President of the United States, to His Beloved Men of the Cherokee Nation" "provides a really interesting insight into George Washington's relations to indigenous peoples," Eudell said. 

Demetrius Eudell showed examples of Dietrich Foundation documents that he’s used while teaching seminars. This 1796 document written and signed by George Washington and James McHenry titled Talk of the President of the United States, to His Beloved Men of the Cherokee Nation “provides a really interesting insight into George Washington’s relations to Indigenous peoples,” Eudell said.

diary

Eudell explained how he worked with undergraduates to transcribe an unpublished diary of Grace Growden Galloway, a notable Revolutionary War-era Philadelphia woman. The diary is dated May 4 to Aug. 31, 1780.

Morrie Heckscher '62, a lifelong friend of Richard Dietrich Sr, and collection board member, talked about Wesleyan's Davison Art Center and how his former Wesleyan professors Sam Green and Heinrich Schwartz inspired him to pursue a career at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Morrie Heckscher ’62, a lifelong friend of Richard Dietrich Sr., and collection board member, talked about Wesleyan’s Davison Art Center and how his former Wesleyan professors Sam Green and Heinrich Schwarz inspired him to pursue a career at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

“Journalism and Social Change” Oct. 23 at 1:30 p.m.

A WESeminar will be held at 1:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 23 in Memorial Chapel titled “Journalism and Social Change: A Conversation with Koeppel Journalism Fellows William Finnegan and Jane Eisner.” The presentation will be moderated by Anne Greene, director of Writing Programs.

William Finnegan

William Finnegan

William Finnegan, staff writer for The New Yorker, is the author of award-winning works of international journalism. He has written about immigration issues and politics in Europe and Mexico; racism and conflict in Southern Africa; and poverty among youth in the U.S.

Jane Eisner ’77, editor of the Forward, a weekly Jewish newspaper of major influence nationally and internationally. She has been a national and international reporter, columnist, and executive editor at the Philadelphia Inquirer and a leader in national discussions of media and democracy.

Jane Eisner '77

Jane Eisner '77

She also is the first woman to win Wesleyan’s McConaughy Award for her contributions to journalism and public life, and she is the first Koeppel Fellow in Journalism at Wesleyan.

The event is free and open to the public, and will also be webcast live.

This event is sponsored by the Koeppel Journalism Fellowship and Wesleyan Writing Programs.