Lim: Constitution Guarantees No or Slow Change

David PesciNovember 7, 20101min
<div class="at-above-post addthis_tool" data-url="http://newsletter.blogs.wesleyan.edu/2010/11/07/lim-constitution-guarantees-no-or-slow-change/"></div>Consecutive elections have turned on 'change' but the Constitution makes rapid change very difficult <!-- AddThis Advanced Settings above via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Advanced Settings below via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Advanced Settings generic via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Share Buttons above via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Share Buttons below via filter on get_the_excerpt --><div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="http://newsletter.blogs.wesleyan.edu/2010/11/07/lim-constitution-guarantees-no-or-slow-change/"></div><!-- AddThis Share Buttons generic via filter on get_the_excerpt -->

In an opinion piece for The Boston Globe, Elvin Lim, assistant professor of government, writes that despite two consecutive elections predicated on rhetoric of “change,” the constructs of the U.S. Constitution make rapid change very difficult, a design the Founders depended on to ensure stability and prevent radicalism. The newsmedia and others may call the result of this ‘gridlock’ in the coming weeks, but that situation was seen as a reasoned way to ”to lock into place our collective decisions when they were derived by ‘choice and deliberation,’ and not by ‘force and accident.’”