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Co-Op Provides Local, Sustainable Food Options

The student-run Wesleyan Local Food Co-op sources a large variety of fresh local foods, including Long Lane Farm produce, and distributes them on campus. Besides produce, the co-op distributes fresh dairy products (milk, cheese, yogurt and butter), meat, eggs, tofu, seitan, granola, bread and coffee, all locally grown, roasted or made.

The program began solely for students but is now open to staff and faculty participation in the wake of expressed interest. More than 500 members of the Wesleyan community are part of one or more co-ops.

Participants pick up shares Wednesday evenings in Usdan and help once each semester with organization and distribution. For more information e-mail wesleyanlocalcoop@gmail.com.

Photos of the Co-op in February are below: (Photos by Aviva Hirsch ’16)

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NESCAC Win Sends Cardinals to NCAA Championship

Coach Joe Reilly takes the net after the Cardinals won the NESCAC championship by defeating Amherst on March 1 at Trinity.

Coach Joe Reilly takes the net after the Cardinals won the NESCAC championship by defeating Amherst on March 1 at Trinity.

Wesleyan defeated Amherst, 74-70, in the championship game of the New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) Men's Basketball Tournament this afternoon. Sixth-seeded Wesleyan improves to 19-8 with its sixth victory in a row, and earns an automatic bid to the NCAA Division III Championship Tournament.

Wesleyan defeated Amherst, 74-70, in the championship game of the New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) Men’s Basketball Tournament March 1.

Wesleyan’s men’s basketball team is heading to the NCAA Division III Championship for the first time in history. On March 6, the team will take on Liberty League champ Skidmore in a first-round game to be played at Johns Hopkins. Winners meet on March 7 to advance to the Sweet 16.

The field of 62 teams in the championship was announced March 2. Wesleyan’s team was crowned NESCAC champs after defeating Amherst 74-70 in overtime on March 1. Wesleyan led most of the game but had to fend off several Lord Jeff rallies to secure an automatic bid to the NCAA Division III Championship. In that game, Jack Mackey ’16 broke the Wesleyan single-season record for three pointers by upping his figure to 75, bettering the mark of 73 set by Chris Bray in 2000-01. Read more about the game here.

“It’s an exciting time for Wesleyan basketball,” said Head Coach Joe Reilly. “We’re proud of our accomplishments so far this season, but rather than looking in the rearview mirror, we’re looking ahead to making more history.”

The 2014-15 Cardinals are now 19-8 on the year, the second greatest number of wins in a season, just behind the 20-6 record of the 2011-12 squad. As the sixth seed, Wesleyan is the lowest seed ever to claim a NESCAC men’s basketball crown.

While the NCAA qualification is the first for men’s basketball, the NESCAC crown is the sixth by a Wesleyan team in the last 10 years. Baseball (2014), football (2013), softball (2010), men’s lacrosse (2009) and men’s soccer (2005) are the other prominent Cardinal squads with NESCAC titles to their credit.

Wesleyan Sets 2015–2016 Student Charges

For the 2015–16 academic year, total student charges will be $62,478 for first-year students and sophomores, and $64,324 for juniors and seniors

For the 2015–16 academic year, total student charges will be $62,478 for first-year students and sophomores, and $64,324 for juniors and seniors.

At its meeting Feb. 28, Wesleyan’s Board of Trustees voted to increase tuition and residential comprehensive fees by 2.1 percent for the 2015–16 year, reflecting the third year of linking tuition increases to the rate of inflation.

The increase is based on the three-year national CPI average of June 30, 2014, the latest full fiscal year available. As a result of this policy, Wesleyan’s student charges for first-year students and sophomores currently rank 14th among a peer comparison group, compared to 1st in 2011. A further decline is anticipated.

“We remain committed to keeping Wesleyan affordable for all students,” said President Michael S. Roth. “Through a generous financial aid program, Wesleyan meets the full need of all its students receiving financial aid, and we ensure that our students leave here without a heavy debt burden.”

The university’s affordability initiative also provides for an optional three-year degree program, saving families about $50,000 on their total tuition bill while retaining the core academic experience for students who participate.

Support for financial aid is the highest priority of Wesleyan’s current campaign, and the university has raised nearly $380 million toward a goal of $400 million.

For the 2015–16 academic year, total student charges will be $62,478 for first-year students and sophomores, and $64,324 for juniors and seniors (reflecting the 2.1 percent increase in residential fees). Tuition will be $48,704 for all students.

WeSlam Poetry Team Takes Victory at Regional Slam

Wesleyan's slam poets competed against five other teams.

Wesleyan’s slam poets competed against five other teams.

Wesleyan’s Slam Poetry Team, WeSlam, took first place at the Yale Regional Poetry Slam Feb. 28 in New Haven, Conn. Wesleyan competed against five other teams from Yale, Brown University, Columbia/Barnard, Middlebury College and Emerson College.

“Our team brought important pieces about racial and religious identity, sexual violence across the gender binary, and gender roles,” said former WeSlam member Mike Rosen ’11, who serves as the team’s advisor.

Poets include Giorgia Peckman ’18, Jon Logan-Rung ’18, Hazem Fahmy ’17, Rick Manayan ’17 and Max Friedlich ’17.

Fahmy received a standing ovation for his poem about popular culture’s portrayal of Islam.

For more information on WeSlam, email WeSlam.wesleyan@gmail.com.

7 Faculty Promoted, Awarded Tenure

In its most recent meeting, the Board of Trustees promoted seven faculty members.

The BOT conferred tenure to Lauren Caldwell, associate professor of classical studies; Stephen Collins, associate professor of film studies; Paul Erickson, associate professor of history; Matthew Garrett, associate professor of English; Brian Northrop, associate professor of chemistry; Julia Randall, associate professor of art; and Seth Redfield, associate professor of astronomy.

The promotions are effective July 1, 2015.

Brief descriptions of their areas of research and teaching appear below.

Lauren Caldwell
Caldwell’s research focuses on Roman social history, Roman law, and Greco-Roman medicine. Her recent book, Roman Girlhood and the Fashioning of Femininity (Cambridge University Press, 2014) investigates the social pressures

PCSE Awards Seed Grants to Student-Led Ventures

Wesleyan’s Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship announced the winners of the 2015 PCSE Seed Grant Challenge. These student-led social ventures will each receive $5,000 in unrestricted funds as well as training, advising, mentoring, incubator workspace and other resources from the Patricelli Center.

Recipients were selected from a strong pool of finalists who submitted written business plans and pitched to a panel of expert judges comprised of alumni, students, faculty and staff. Applicants were assessed on their project design, leadership qualities and potential for social impact.

The 2015 Seed Grant recipients are:

Jewish Community Makes Hamantaschen Cookies to Celebrate Purim Holiday

About 30 students gathered in Usdan 110 on March 2 to celebrate the coming of Purim by making hamantaschen. The triangular cookies are filled with a sweet filling, usually made of poppy seeds, and are traditionally eaten during the Purim holiday, which begins on the evening of March 4. Matt Renetzky ’18 and Rabbi Levi Schectman organized the event through Chabad at Wesleyan along with help from Elli Scharlin '18 and Aaron Josephs '18.

About 30 students gathered in Usdan 110 on March 2 to celebrate the coming of Purim by making hamantaschen. The triangular cookies are filled with a sweet filling, usually made of poppy seeds, and are traditionally eaten during the Purim holiday, which begins on the evening of March 4. Matt Renetzky ’18 and Rabbi Levi Schectman (pictured) organized the event through Chabad at Wesleyan along with help from Elli Scharlin ’18 and Aaron Josephs ’18.

War Veteran, Posse Scholar Stascavage ’18 Pursuing Degree in Economics

Posse scholar Bryan Stascavage '18 served from August 2006 until March 2012 as a U.S. Army military intelligence analyst. He was deployed three times: twice to Iraq and once on a humanitarian aid mission in Haiti in 2010. Now Stascavage is a member of the Class of 2018 at Wesleyan. (Photo by Laurie Kenney)

Posse scholar Bryan Stascavage ’18 served from August 2006 until March 2012 as a U.S. Army military intelligence analyst. He was deployed three times: twice to Iraq and once on a humanitarian aid mission in Haiti in 2010. Now Stascavage is a member of the Class of 2018 at Wesleyan and is working towards a degree in economics. (Photo by Laurie Kenney)

While walking back to his room from Al-Faw Palace in Baghdad, Iraq, Bryan Stascavage ’18 remembers telling a friend about his plans for the future.

“When I get out of the military, I’m going back to college with a vengeance,” Stascavage said. “A perfect 4.0 GPA or bust. I’m not messing around and wasting this opportunity like I did my first time around.”

His first time in college, which he attended right after high school, had been an “unmitigated disaster,” Stascavage recalls. He only lasted three semesters with a GPA hovering around a 2.0. After taking a wide array of courses at several community colleges in Connecticut, and then working as an apprentice for a writer in California, Stascavage joined the military as an intelligence analyst in August 2006.

“I joined for personal and patriotic reasons: the war in Iraq was going poorly,

Gruen’s New Book Explores Human-Animal Relationships

Lori Gruen

Lori Gruen

Lori Gruen, professor and chair of philosophy, professor of environmental studies, and professor of feminist, gender and sexuality studies, is the author of a new book, Entangled Empathy: An Alternative Ethic for Our Relationships with Animals, published by Lantern Books on Feb. 15.

In Entangled Empathy, Gruen argues that rather than focusing on animal rights, we ought to work to make our relationships with animals right by empathetically responding to their needs, interests, desires, vulnerabilities, hopes and unique perspectives. Pointing out that we are already entangled in complex and life-altering relationships with other animals, Gruen guides readers through a new way of thinking about and practicing animal ethics.

Gruen defines “entangled empathy” as “a process whereby we first acknowledge that we are already in relationships with all sorts of other animals (humans and non-humans) and these relationships are, for the most part, not very good ones. We then work to figure out how to make them better and that almost always means trying to promote well-being and flourishing.”

Gruen discussed her book with University of Colorado Professor Emeritus Mark Bekoff in The Huffington Post. Bekoff calls the book “a wonderful addition to a growing literature in the transdisciplinary field called anthrozoology, the study of human-animal relationships.”

Gruen Discusses Her New Book Entangled Empathy

Lori Gruen

Lori Gruen is chair and professor of philosophy, professor of environmental studies, and professor of feminist, gender and sexuality studies.

Lori Gruen, professor and chair of philosophy, discussed her new book, Entangled Empathy: An Alternative Ethic for Our Relationships with Animalswith University of Colorado Professor Emeritus Mark Bekoff in The Huffington Post. Bekoff calls the book “a wonderful addition to a growing literature in the transdisciplinary field called anthrozoology, the study of human-animal relationships.”

Gruen defines “entangled empathy” as “a process whereby we first acknowledge that we are already in relationships with all sorts of other animals (humans and non-humans) and these relationships are, for the most part, not very good ones. We then work to figure out how to make them better and that almost always means trying to promote well-being and flourishing.”

She adds, “One thing I think is crucial in our process of thinking differently about our relationships is to recognize that making those relationships better requires practice. There isn’t a ‘one size fits all’ solution. We need to continually learn more about ourselves and others to improve the lives of everyone. We will make mistakes, so we should always engage with a fair dose of humility, but also be hopeful that we can fix our mistakes and hone our empathetic skills.”

Read the full interview here.

Gruen also recently penned an op-ed titled, “Ban Greyhound Racing Now,” published on Al Jazeera America’s website. She relates her personal experience adopting a rescued greyhound who was a former racing dog, and more generally describes the “grotesque cruelty in the racing industry.”

Gruen also is professor of environmental studies, and professor of feminist, gender and sexuality studies.

Tucker to Study Victorian Sustainability, River Pollution Prevention Reform as Visiting Fellow

Jennifer Tucker

Jennifer Tucker is associate professor of history; associate professor of environmental studies; associate professor of feminist, gender, and sexuality studies; associate professor of science in society and faculty fellow in the College of the Environment.

As a 2015 Humanities Research Centre Visiting Fellow, Associate Professor Jennifer Tucker will study Victorian sustainability, photography, law and river pollution prevention reform at Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra, Australia.

Her appointment will be May 15-July 15.

Tucker’s ongoing research, tentatively titled “Science Against Industry: Photographic Technologies and the Visual Politics of Pollution Reform,” traces the historical roots of the use of visual evidence in environmental science and pollution reform. Using nearly 300 visual representations (drawings, engravings photographs, and graphs) from archives and libraries, many of which have never previously been studied, she analyzes the scientific impact of new forms of visual representation in chemical climatology and examines the presentation and use of specific visual exhibits in Victorian courtroom debates over air and river pollution.

The research addresses current questions that lie at the heart of several fields and disciplines, including environmental history,

Wesleyan Orchestra Performs for Local Children

On. Feb. 28, the Wesleyan University Orchestra performed "CATcerto and Musical Beasts" for area children.

On. Feb. 28, the Wesleyan University Orchestra performed “CATcerto and Musical Beasts” for area children.