All News

Chong ’18 to Represent Hong Kong in Tennis at Asian Games

Eudice Chong '18

Eudice Chong ’18

Eudice Chong ’18, a native of Sai Kung, Hong Kong, will be representing her nation in the 17th Asian Games, to be held in Incheon, South Korea from Sept. 19-Oct. 4.

Forty-Five nations will be represented at the Games with 439 events in 36 disciplines being contested. Chong is Wesleyan’s number-one player in women’s tennis and went 4-0 during the team’s opening activity, a double tournament hosted by Sacred Heart University Sept. 6.

She will be competing in both doubles and mixed doubles during the Asian Games. Chong is currently ranked 323rd in the most recent International Tennis Federation World Junior Rankings.

Telfair’s Paintings Celebrated at Zilkha Gallery

On Sept. 16, Professor of Art Tula Telfair spoke about her new landscape paintings which are on display through Dec. 7 in the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery.

On Sept. 16, Professor of Art Tula Telfair spoke about her new landscape paintings which are on display through Dec. 7 in the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery.

“A World of Dreams—New Landscape Paintings” by Professor of Art Tula Telfair will be on exhibit through Dec. 7 at the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery. “A World of Dreams” includes new large-scale paintings in which Telfair presents monumental landscapes and epic-scale vistas that are simultaneously awe-inspiring and intimate. This is her second exhibition in the Zilkha Gallery. Read more about the exhibit here.

The exhibit’s opening reception was held Sept. 16 at the gallery. (Photos by Dat Vu ’15)

art_pai_2014-0917135938

Wes Media Project Analyzes Campaign Advertising

The Wesleyan Media Project is back with a new analysis of campaign advertising in this year’s midterm elections. As Vox reports, WMP’s new analysis shows Democrats holding a clear advertising advantage in Senate races in many key states. The story explains:

Some of the largest ad advantages for Democrats have been in Colorado and Michigan, where they are leading, as well as Arkansas and Georgia, where GOP candidates appear to have the edge. Republicans only had a sizable ad advantage in one key state — New Hampshire, where Scott Brown seems to have recently gained a bit of ground in polls. [...]

Some of this advantage is because more Democratic incumbents are at risk, and incumbents usually have an easier time raising money than challengers. But Democrats are getting substantial support from Super PACs and dark money groups as well…

 The Washington Post cites the WMP report in its story on how pro-Democratic independent groups–especially, Senate Majority PAC and Patriot Majority–are playing an aggressive role in Senate races this year:

Perhaps most notably, the super PAC has held its own on the air against Americans for Prosperity, a conservative advocacy group that is the primary political organ of a network backed by the Koch brothers and other wealthy donors on the right. By the end of the summer, the two groups had run nearly the same volume of television ads nationwide, according to Kantar Media/CMAG data analyzed by the Wesleyan Media Project.

And the National Journal picked up on WMP’s finding that the 2014 ad campaign is opening with more negativity than 2012 or 2014:

In U.S. Senate races, 55 percent of ads aired over the last two weeks were negative, meaning the ad only criticized the opponent. Another 17.5 percent of Senate ads aired in the past two weeks were “contrast ads,” or ads that mention both the opponent and the sponsor’s favored candidate. Just 27.5 percent of the ads were positive. By comparison, ads for gubernatorial and House races over that period were more than 40 percent negative.

Ads for both House and Senate races have become increasingly negative since 2010. Between 2012 and 2014, the share of negative ads for gubernatorial campaigns jumped by 20 points—from 23.3 percent to 43.8 percent.

“So far the 2014 midterms are seeing increased volume and increased negativity over 2010, which is going to make citizens even less happy with the tone of the airwaves,” Michael Franz, the Wesleyan Media Project’s co-director, said. “Evidence from political science suggests, however, that citizens may be more informed as a result of the negativity.”

Read the entire new study here. Read more coverage of the study in FiveThirtyEight, USA Today here and here, The Wall Street Journal (requires subscription), The Hill, Scripps News, and The Huffington Post.

Roth to Discuss “The Future of Education” at Social Good Summit

Logo_SGS2014President Michael Roth is scheduled to discuss “The Future of Education” at the 92nd Street Y’s Social Good Summit Sunday, Sept. 21.

In his second appearance at the annual two-day festival of ideas, Roth will discuss why education is still the best vehicle for social change, even while it has become more controversial then ever.

Michael Roth

Michael Roth

“Education remains the most potent tool for changing the world, ” he said. “And training teachers who can help students acquire the skills to keep learning, the skills to think for oneself, is one of the most pressing demands of social justice.”

Last year, Roth’s inspirational talk at the 92Y event focused on “how to change the world,” which later became the topic of a popular MOOC he taught on the Coursera platform. This year, his speech will be informed by his recently published book, Beyond the University: Why Liberal Education Matters (Yale Press).

This year’s summit, with the theme “Connecting for Good, Connecting for All,” will bring together world leaders, new media and technology experts, grassroots activists, and voices from around the world to explore how technology and new media can be leveraged to benefit people everywhere and create a better world by the year 2030.

The conference will take place Sept. 20-21.

Faculty, NPR Reporter Speak at Berlin Wall Commemoration

berlinwallIn 1961, the Communist government of the German Democratic Republic began constructing a 96-mile-long dividing wall in attempt to prevent Western “fascists” from entering East Germany and undermining the socialist state. The Berlin Wall, made of concrete and barbed wire, prevented emigration and more than 170 people were killed trying to cross or get around the wall. On Nov. 9, 1989, the head of the East German Communist party opened the checkpoint, allowing thousands of East and West Berlin residents to pass through. Elated residents, later known as “wallpeckers” used hammers and picks to break apart the wall.

In 1990, East and West Germany reunified into a single German state. To date, the wall serves as a symbolic boundary between democracy and Communism during the Cold War.

In commemoration of the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, the German Studies Department is hosting a series of lectures.

At noon, Sept. 24, Eric Grimmer-Solem will speak on

CareerDrive Will Put Student Job Searches in Gear

Wesleyan's Career Center offers a new recruiting platform called CareerDrive. Students can access the tools through their e-portfolio and search and apply for jobs and internships, view the employer directory, manage career advising appointments and browse a calendar listing of upcoming workshops, employer information sessions and on-campus interviews. The platform also offers integration with LinkedIn and Facebook to shows students their connections with specific organizations.

Wesleyan’s Career Center offers a new recruiting platform called CareerDrive. Students can access the tools through their e-portfolio and search and apply for jobs and internships, view the employer directory, manage career advising appointments and browse a calendar listing of upcoming workshops, employer information sessions and on-campus interviews. The platform also offers integration with LinkedIn and Facebook to shows students their connections with specific organizations. CareerDrive is one of many professional development initiatives offered by the Wesleyan Career Center this fall.

Students getting ready for life beyond campus can take advantage of several comprehensive professional development initiatives offered by the Wesleyan Career Center.

CareerDrive fuels students’ efforts to learn career management skills, search for jobs and internships, sign up for events, and track progress toward their goals. Powered by CSO Research, CareerDrive will allow students to search and apply for jobs and internships, store their documents, register for events and gain access to subscription-only online resources. It replaces Wesleyan’s previous recruiting system. One feature will allow job-seekers to see social media connections in target organizations.

“It’s a great tool,” said Sharon Belden Castonguay, director of the Career Center. “Say you type in Widgets, Inc. – Drive will let you see whether your LinkedIn or Facebook connections work there, people who may be able to provide insight into the organization.”

While the new recruiting platform is open to all students, seniors can participate in Accelerate, a “job search boot camp” running concurrently with the fall recruiting season, providing job hunters with real-time guidance.

Staff on the Move, August 2014

The Office of Human Resources reported the following new hires and departures for August 2014:

Newly hired
Sydney Lewis was hired as an assistant dean of admission on Aug. 4.

William Jack was hired as the associate dean of admission and financial aid on Aug. 4.

Nicholas Vennochi was hired as a sports information intern on Aug. 11.

Caitlyn DeClement joined the President’s Office as an office assistant on Aug. 18.

WSA Hosts 21st Annual Student Groups Fair

The Wesleyan Student Assembly (WSA) hosted the 21st Annual Student Groups Fair Sept. 12 behind Usdan University Center.

The campus-wide event allowed both new and returning students to learn about new and established student groups, network with different academic departments and interact with several vendors from the local Middletown community. About 70 student groups were represented at the event.

Photos of the event are below: (Photos by Harry Jiang ’18)

eve_sgf_2014-0912151204 eve_sgf_2014-0912151603

Wesleyan, Local Community Celebrate “Freedom Summer” with Commemoration, Concerts

eve_freedomsummer_2014-0912022322

Wesleyan students, faculty, staff and community members participated in a “Freedom Summer” commemoration Sept. 12-13 on campus.

The summer of 1964 saw thousands of young people — many from colleges and universities in the North – mobilize to register voters, educate citizens, and support other civil rights work in the Jim Crow South. What came to be known as “Freedom Summer” is credited with ending the isolation of states where racial repression and discrimination was largely ignored by news media and politicians, despite the  the landmark Civil Rights Act passed that July.

The summer of 1964 saw thousands of young people — many from colleges and universities in the North – mobilize to register voters, educate citizens, and support other civil rights work in the Jim Crow South. What came to be known as “Freedom Summer” is credited with ending the isolation of states where racial repression and discrimination was largely ignored by news media and politicians, despite the the landmark Civil Rights Act passed that July.

Wesleyan is an “Oasis of Electricity” With Microgrid

Government Technology featured Wesleyan’s efforts to protect itself from losing power during storms and other disasters by installing a microgrid, a concept gaining popularity across the country. As the article explains:

Wesleyan can insulate itself from widespread power outages by generating its own power and making sure it can distribute that electricity to the 312 buildings on campus without depending on the outside grid. As an oasis of electricity, the college can now better serve its students and act as a staging area to coordinate disaster response for Middletown.

[...] “When we talk about microgrids, it’s a wicked hot topic. It’s going to be in the dictionary next year as a new word, like ‘Twitter,’” said Alan Rubacha, director of Wesleyan University’s physical plant. “But it’s existed for a long time.”

Hornstein, Nguyen ’12 Published in International Review of Financial Analysis

Abigail Hornstein, associate professor of economics, and her former thesis student, Zachary Nguyen ’12 are the co-authors of a paper titled “Is More Less? Propensity to Diversify via M&A and Market” published in the International Review of Financial Analysis, June 2014, pp. 64-88.

Mergers and acquisitions (M&A) could lead to a firm diversifying into new industries, and the impact of this may be related to the firm’s prior diversification. By using a panel of 1,030 M&A transactions from 2000-2010, Hornstein and Nguyen found that that previously diversified firms are more likely to pursue industrially diversifying M&A.

“Both previous and contemporary diversification measures are not associated with the firm’s cumulative abnormal returns (CAR) at time of announcement but have a lasting effect on various performance measures up to two years later,” Hornstein explained. “We find evidence supporting both a diversification discount and premium, which can be predicted by the sign of the CAR at time of announcement.”

Their study suggests that while diversification is necessary to explain firm value, it is not sufficient.

After graduating, Nguyen worked at Charles River Associates in Boston 2012-14 and is now a first year student at The University of California — Berkeley School of Law.

Wesleyan Declares Beta Fraternity House Off-limits to All Students

Citing incidents that raised serious questions about safety at the Beta Theta Pi house, Wesleyan has declared the fraternity residence off-limits to all university students.

The decision, announced Sept. 10 by President Michael Roth and Vice President for Student Affairs Mike Whaley, came three days after a sophomore woman was seriously injured in a fall from a third-floor window at Beta.

“We have lost confidence in the ability of the fraternity members to manage social and residential activities at the house and abide by university policies,” Roth and Whaley wrote in an email to the campus community. “Wesleyan has an obligation to do what it reasonably can to ensure the safety of every member of the community, including the Beta fraternity members and their guests. The Beta house will remain off-limits to all Wesleyan students for the rest of the academic year at least.”

The 15 students living at Beta were provided with alternative university housing, and asked to leave the premises by Sept. 15.

Roth and Whaley said their decision was “based on the long history of incidents” at Beta.

The most recent of these occurred during a party on Sept. 7, when the student fell three stories, sustaining multiple and serious injuries, and was airlifted to a Hartford Hospital. Public Safety and Middletown Police responded to the incident. As of Sept. 11, she remained in intensive care but her condition was reported to be improving.

The ban on Beta includes social events, and will continue at least through the academic year. “Down the road we are open to seeing from the fraternity a considered plan for the house and social activities there that satisfies our expectations for residential life at our university,” Roth and Whaley said.

There are three residential single-sex fraternities at Wesleyan, including Psi Upsilon and Delta Kappa Epsilon. In addition, there are coeducational residential societies including Eclectic and Alpha Delta Phi, and several nonresidential Greek societies, including Wesleyan’s only sorority, Rho Epsilon.

The fraternity residences are considered “program housing” at Wesleyan, although the properties are not owned by the university.