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Civil Rights Activist to Speak on Martin Luther King, Jr.


Posted 01/22/07
Wesleyan will celebrate the life and legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. with a keynote by the poet, author and civil rights activist Sonia Sanchez, pictured at left, from 4:15 to 5:30 p.m. Jan. 30 in the Memorial Chapel.

Professor Sanchez’s works are often passionate poems or works of prose that touch on social issues of modern and past times. Many of her poems are blunt, passionate and painfully truthful. She addresses the history of African-Americans from slave times to modern oppression. From Malcolm X she also learned how to present her poetry and always sustain the attention of the audience.

Sanchez refers to the influence of Martin Luther King, Jr. She met King in 1957 during a stop on his book tour. In an interview with a Seattle newspaper, Sanchez reflected on Dr. King’s work and recalled her reaction to his death. A more in-depth biography can be found at: http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/276.

“We are excited to have such a prominent poet and civil rights activist at Wesleyan for this important celebration,” says Rick Culliton, dean of Campus Programs and member of the MLK Jr. Celebration Planning Committee. “Professor Sanchez’s poetry speaks to the legacy of Dr. King in so many ways and we are honored to welcome her to campus to help us remember Dr. King and his many accomplishments.”

The Martin Luther King, Jr. commemoration received funding from the Office of the Dean of the College, the President’s Office, and the Office of Affirmative Action, with planning and support from a committee of staff, students and faculty.

The MLK Jr. Celebration Planning Committee consists of Ruby-Beth Buitekant ’09; Kevin Butler, dean of Student Services; Rick Culliton, dean of Campus Programs; Nicole Chabot, Student Activities program coordinator; Diana Dozier, associate director of Affirmative Action; Persephone Hall, assistant director of Human Resources; Julius Hampton, ’09; Frank Kuan, director of Community Relations; Cathy Crimmins-Lechowicz, director of Community Service and Volunteerism; Tim Shiner, director of Student Activities and Leadership Development; Gina Ulysse, assistant professor of African American studies and anthropology.
 

By Olivia Drake, The Wesleyan Connection editor

An Evening With Bill Cosby Raises $2.5M for Scholarships


Bill Cosby mingles with Midge and Doug Bennet during a gala benefit in New York Jan. 17.(Photo by Bill Burkhart)
Posted 01/22/07
Bill Cosby donated his talents to a gala benefit performance at the Pierre Hotel in New York City Jan. 17, raising $2.5 million for Wesleyan scholarships from the more than 400 individuals in attendance. Cosby, father of Erica ’87, is widely known for his personal commitment to education and his generous support of educational causes.

Cosby spoke warmly of the efforts by Wesleyan alumni to support financial aid and said, “Mrs. Cosby and I believe that the price of education in the United States of America shouldn’t be unattainable.”

He delivered a comedic monologue that had the value of education as a central theme. Following the performance, Vice President for University Relations Barbara-Jan Wilson announced that a four-year Wesleyan scholarship had been named in Cosby’s honor.

Cosby received a Doctor of Humane Letters degree from Wesleyan in 1987.

Men’s Ice Hockey Takes Europe by Storm


At top, The men’s ice hockey team played the HC Valvenosta in Laces, Italy over Christmas break while touring Europe and playing several games. At right, members of the team take in the sights in Innsbruck, Austria.

Below, Wesleyan plays the Caldaro Under-26 squad in Caldaro, Italy. (Photos contributed by Chris Potter)

Posted 01/22/07
During the winter holiday break, the men’s ice hockey team toured Germany, Austria and Italy, competing against four local club teams, and winning all the games while beating opponents by a combined score of 30-1.

“I’m afraid the competition there wasn’t quite up to level we expected,” said fourth-year head coach Chris Potter. “But it still gave us a chance to skate, practice a few new things and improve our game overall.”

The planning for the trip began almost two years ago. Wesleyan teams are permitted foreign travel once every four years. Following the 2004-05 season, Coach Potter and his upperclassmen began discussing options. “We talked about the Czech Republic and Scandinavia, but in the end this trip won out,” Coach Potter explained.

Using numerous fund-raising techniques to help cover the $1,900 cost per individual, the team accumulated enough money to bring a contingent of 36 people, including all 32 players, the three coaches and the head athletic trainer. They were joined by 30 family members, bringing the total for the trip to 66.

The three-country trip began in began in Munich, Germany, a city that left an impression on at least one player.

“I thought our three days in Munich were the best,” said forward J.J. Evans ’09. “It seemed so European and I thought the bratwurst was spectacular. Even though I got a kiss from an Italian girl on New Year’s Eve when we were in Bolzano, I’m still going with Munich.”

For team captain Will Bennett ’07 Innsbruck, Austria was a favorite. He also said the location of the team’s final contest against the Caldaro (Italy) Under-26 squad, an 8-0 Wesleyan win, was amazing.

“This rink was dropped right into the countryside,” Bennett said. “It made you wonder how they managed to build it where they did.”

Soon after returning, the Cardinals managed to get their skates back on for their regular-scheduled home games on January 5 and 6. Wesleyan won both to extend its current unbeaten streak to five games and hold a 5-3-2 overall record. It is the first time the team has held a winning record after 10 games since 1988-89.

“I’m seeing the team starting to gel,” said Coach Potter. “I think the trip was valuable and I made some interesting rooming assignments to help the players get more comfortable with each other. I’m hoping the whole thing will pay off as the season progresses.”
 

By Brian Katten, sports information director

Associate Professor Judges Biomedical Conference for Minorities


Ishita Mukerji, chair and associate professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, uses a UV resonance Raman spectrometer in her research at Wesleyan. Mukerji recently attended a conference in California, judging presentations on biomedical sciences.
Posted 01/22/07
Encouraging underrepresented minority students to pursue advanced training in the biomedical and behavioral sciences was the purpose of a recent conference in Anaheim, Calif. And the chair of Wesleyan’s Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Department was there to help guide these students down that path.

Ishita Mukerji, chair and associate professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, was among 220 scientists around the country who attended the 2006 Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS), held Nov. 8-11.

The scientists volunteered their time and energy in judging the 1,048 poster presentations and 72 oral presentations.

“The number of minority students in biomedical research is very small,” Mukerji explains. “I and my colleagues are committed to improving diversity in the sciences and this is a great opportunity to meet and interact with minority students. We would like to have more under-represented students at all levels in the sciences at Wesleyan and this is one way to interact with minority students and potentially recruit them to come to Wesleyan University.”

Now in its seventh year, ABRCMS is the largest professional conference for biomedical and behavioral students. Over 2,500 people attended the 2006 conference including 1,633 students, 421 faculty and program directors and 418 exhibitors. ABRCMS is supported by a grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and managed by the American Society for Microbiology.

By volunteering as a judge, Mukerji served in one of the most important roles at the conference, explains Ronica Rodela, spokesperson for the ABRCMS.

“The judge’s role in providing constructive feedback to student presenters positively enhances the professional development and advancement of students in their scientific research,” Rodela says.

These presentations were given by undergraduate, graduate, post-baccalaureate students as well as postdoctoral scientists in nine sub-disciplines in the biomedical and behavioral sciences. The top 120 undergraduates received monetary awards of $250 for their outstanding research.

Mukerji says some of the research she judged was comparable to the research being done by Wesleyan undergraduates. On the other hand, there is a wide range of science presented at the conference, and some of the students are coming from two-year institutions that don’t have a lot of resources for doing science.

“The judging process is an interactive one in which I usually talk to the students about their research project, their scientific interests and what their future plans are,” Mukerji explains. “Many of them are very enthusiastic about their projects and that makes the judging a lot of fun. On the whole I find it to be a very rewarding experience.”

Mukerji is currently the chairperson of the Minority Affairs Committee for the Biophysical Society. For their annual meeting in March, she has arranged a panel discussion on “Recruitment, Retention and Mentoring of Under-represented Students.” Featured panelists will be representatives from MentorNet and Venture Scholars. Both of these organizations are committed to increasing diversity at all levels in the sciences.

For more information on the conference, visit www.abrcms.org. The 2007 ABRCMS is scheduled for Nov. 7-10 in Austin, Texas.
 

By Olivia Drake, The Wesleyan Connection editor

Press and Marking Coordinator Fills the Seats at CFA Performances


Adam Kubota, press and marketing coordinator for the Center for the Arts helps more than 275 shows a year get publicity at Wesleyan and with the local media.
 
Posted 01/17/07
Q: When did you first come to Wesleyan, and when were you officially full-time for the Center for the Arts?

A: I started as interim CFA press and marketing coordinator at Wesleyan in November of 2005, filling in for Lex Leifheit while she was the interim assistant director of the Green Street Arts Center. Lex finished her assignment in February, leaving me to look for a new job. Fortunately for both of us, she was hired as the permanent assistant director of Green Street in September of 2006 and I was able to apply for her previous position.

Q: Explain your role as the press and marketing coordinator for the CFA.

A: At its most basic, my job is to fill the seats for the events that we put on. It’s mostly about raising awareness and engaging people through a variety of methods by pitching stories to the press, increasing distribution of our brochure and email newsletter. As for promotion, we try to reach people from all over Connecticut and the region, members of the Middletown community including Wesleyan faculty and staff, but most importantly, Wesleyan students.

Q: What are the biggest challenges you face in your job?

A: The biggest challenge is staying organized. The CFA has a hand in producing over 275 events a year. It is my job to see that they are all, in some way, brought to the attention of the public. Thankfully, I get a lot of support from my co-workers in making sure it all happens smoothly.

Q: How did you familiarize yourself with the job?

A: Lex has been and continues to be a great resource to me in my job—she definitely helped to show me the ropes. Since I am also responsible for publicizing Green Street events, we are constantly in contact. And obviously, my experience as interim marketing coordinator in 2005 has helped me in being the permanent marketing coordinator.

Q: Who are the key people you interact with on a daily basis?

A: CFA Director Pam Tatge; Art Director John Elmore; Associate Director for Programming and Events Barbara Ally; Events Coordinator Jeff Chen; Box Office Manager Kristen Olson; Financial Analyst/Gallery Coordinator Camille Parente; the Green Street Arts Center staff and the CFA student workers.

Q: What activities consume most of your time while in the office?

A: I spend a significant amount of time writing press releases, e-mails and listings on the computer, as well as attending meetings. Truthfully, I wish that I could get out more often and interact with the Wesleyan Community—it’s something to shoot for as I settle into my job and streamline things a bit more.

Q: What are your own interests in the arts and do you attend any CFA-sponsored events?

A: As a bassist who performs in a variety of styles including, jazz, classical and contemporary music, I am always performing or going to concerts. Considering this fact, working at the CFA is a dream job. I try to go to our events as much possible. It’s really gratifying to see the fruits of our labor in a well-attended performance.

Q: Are there any exciting, worth-mentioning events coming up in the next couple months we should be aware of?

A: Yes, the Joe Goode Performance group is coming Feb. 2-3. Like me, they are from the San Francisco area and their company of virtuosic dancers tackles such issues as gay marriage and the AIDS crisis.

Singer-songwriter Paul Brady, who has penned hit songs for the likes of Bonnie Raitt and Joe Cocker, is appearing for the Crowell Concert Series Feb. 16.

My pick-of-the-semester is jazz pianist Cedar Walton on April 27. Cedar is a real living legend—his resume reads like the history of jazz!

Q: Where are you from initially and how did you end up in the area?

A: I was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area, in a small town on the Peninsula called Belmont. I moved to Connecticut about four years ago to study with double bassist Robert Black, who is known for his work with the Bang On a Can All-Stars, and do graduate work at the Hartt School of Performing Arts.

Q: Where were you working before Wesleyan?

A: My first job in arts marketing was at Real Art Ways, a great alternative art space in Hartford. Over last summer, I worked for the International Festival of Arts & Ideas in New Haven.

Q: Where are your degrees from and what were your majors?

A: I have a bachelor’s of arts in music from the University of California, Santa Cruz, where our mascot is the Banana Slug! I also received my master’s of music in double bass performance from the Hartt School at the University of Hartford.

Q: What do you like to do in your free time?

A: Most nights and weekends, I am busy performing music. I do a lot of gigs with my band in addition to working as freelancer. I play bass—both the upright and the electric. As I mentioned before, I perform in many styles but I am most at home with improvised music like jazz and contemporary music.

As for hobbies, I like fishing, Frisbee golf, running, playing basketball and seeing exhibitions of contemporary art. I am excited to say that I am taking a vacation to Peru in March—the plan is to hike from Cuzco to see the ruins of Macchu Picchu.

Q: Anything else you’d like to share?

A: At this point, I’ve been on the job for just a few months and I’d really like to meet more people who work on campus. It helps me a great deal to know what other people’s roles on campus are. So, if you are interested in any of the things that I do, please send me a quick e-mail.
 

By Olivia Drake, The Wesleyan Connection editor

Associate Director of Athletics Makes Time for All Sports


Richard Whitmore, associate director of Athletics, oversees the scheduling of all 15 Wesleyan athletic facilities, including the Wesleyan Natatorium.
 
Posted 01/17/07
On any given day, there are 29 athletic teams, 10 intramural sports, several sport-related clubs or Wesleyan employees all vying for a rink, court, pool or field to use for practice or play.

It is the job of Richard Whitmore, associate director of Athletics, to schedule Wesleyan’s athletic facilities with those who need them. And when occupied, he insures the venue is safe, secure and teams are equipped properly.

“Half of my job is working with people to schedule the facilities, but I also spend a lot of time coordinating the games and making sure everyone has everything they need prior to their game, meet or match,” Whitmore says. “There’s always something new happening, and that makes working in this field very exciting.”

Whitmore meets with at least a dozen Wesleyan coaches every day, and interacts with numerous students who drop by, e-mail or call in facility requests. He attends most home-games, of every sport, to make sure the athletes have everything they require for the event. Preparing the fields with proper markings, fencing and seating also is completed under his supervision.

“Being able to watch a little bit of every home game is a great benefit to this position,” Whitmore says.

Whitmore came to Wesleyan in 1999 as the athletic facility manager. He later took on the role of managing the 1,500-seat Spurrier-Snyder Rink, which is occupied 18 hours a day between October and March. Nowadays, he oversees all 15 facilities, including the Macomber Boathouse, Rosenbaum Squash Center, the John Wood Memorial Tennis Courts, Bacon Field House and the new Smith Field for field hockey, soccer and lacrosse.

“Wesleyan is extremely fortunate to have Richard as a member of the Department of Physical Education administrative staff,” says John Biddiscombe, director of Athletics and chair of the Physical Education Department. “He has an outstanding background as a Ivy League student athlete, a successful college head coach and athletic administrator. Also, his user friendly management style is appreciated by the students, faculty and staff and the smooth operation of the athletic facilities is a direct result of his efforts.”

Whitmore also helped with the planning of the Freeman Athletic Center addition. Prior to its opening in January 2005, he’d have to manage the athletic affairs in the old Fayerweather Gymnasium and the former Alumni Athletic Building.

“It’s so great to have everything under one roof now,” Whitmore explains. “It not only makes managing these facilities much easier, but it’s good for our student athletes and spectators alike. Now we can have a hockey game, an indoor track meet and swim meet all going on at the same time, in the same building, and this gives visitors a real sense of what our athletic program is all about.”

In addition, Whitmore says the new athletic center offers facilities equivalent or better than other liberal arts colleges in the area.

It’s not only Wesleyan coaches and athletes who seek space in the Freeman Athletic Center. University Relations has requested rooms during graduation. Middlesex Youth Hockey has its base of operations out of the Spurrier-Snyder Rink, and area high schools use the Andersen Track for their competitions.

Whitmore, along with Kate Mullen, head coach of women’s basketball, and Kirsten Carlson, administrative assistant, use the campus-wide program Scheduler-Plus to keep track of spaces being used at certain times.

“It can be challenging to stay on top of things, but somehow we manage to do so,” Whitmore says.

Whitmore, a native of Waterville, Maine, is a former basketball, baseball and football player himself. His father, Dick Whitmore, has coached Colby College’s men’s basketball team for 38 years, and served as athletic director from 1986-2003.

Richard Whitmore attended Brown University, graduating with a Bachelor’s of Arts in American civilization in 1990. During his junior year, he tore a ligament in his knee during the basketball season, ending his career. Nevertheless, a teammate wrote the NBA, requesting that Whitmore be considered as a candidate for the draft under the provisions of the Hardship Rule.

“No one else from an Ivy League school had made it into the NBA draft as a Hardship candidate before,” Whitmore says, smiling. “I sure got a lot of local press from that one.”

Like his father, he decided to take a coaching career path starting at Daniel Webster College as a basketball and baseball coach. He also worked as a sports information director. In 1996, he moved to Kenyon College in Ohio, also to coach basketball and baseball.

“Coaching was a fun part of my life, and I enjoyed working with the students one-on-one, but I also enjoy the administrative side of sports,” Whitmore says. “I am glad to be doing what I do now.”
 

By Olivia Drake, The Wesleyan Connection editor

Web Site Teaches Haitian Celebration Through Text, Sound, Video


A new learning objects tool, designed by Associate Professor Elizabeth McAlister, features multimedia tools to help teach the story of Rara.
Posted 01/17/07
In Haiti, the people celebrate their African ancestry and religion with a Rara festival, a culturally rich musical and dance event.

Elizabeth McAlister, associate professor of Religion and chair of the Religion Department, associate professor of African American studies, and associate professor of American studies, has studied this tradition for 15 years. Through a newly-created teaching tool, she hopes people can gain new insights on the Rara festival.

Designed by Wesleyan’s Learning Objects Studio staff, the Web site, http://rara.wesleyan.edu/ is available for academic and public use. The site is already being used at classes at New York University and Swarthmore.

“My hope is that people interested in Rara, students, musicians, artists, travelers and other researchers, will be able to use this Web site as an interactive study guide,” McAlister says.

McAlister’s interest in Rara dates back to 1991 when she began researching Haiti’s vibrant culture, often celebrated through Rara. In 2002, she published a book titled, “Rara! Vodou, Power and Performance in Haiti and its Diaspora.” The Web site serves as a companion piece to her book on Rara.

“After my book on Rara came out, internet technology made it possible to display the photographs and videotape that I made in Haiti, together with my friends and collaborators,” she explains.

Through the online tool, McAlister posted a 15-minute film about Rara, music and dance clips. She included images, video and audio clips of Rara as a carnival; Rara as a religious obligation in Vodou; Rara and the Christians and Jews; Rara gender and sexuality; Rara and politics; and Rara in New York City.

In each section, McAlister includes media, notes from the field, and an analysis, often adapted from her book.

When explaining Rara as a form of carnival, McAlister explains, in the analysis, that “the ‘tone,’ or ‘ambiance,’ of Rara parading is loud and carnivalesque … As in Carnival, Rara is about moving through the streets, and about men establishing masculine reputation through public performance. Rara bands stop to perform for noteworthy people, to collect money. In return, the kings and queens dance and sing, and the baton majors juggle batons-and even machetes!”

The site includes clips on several Rara bands including La Belle Fraicheur de l’Anglade in Fermathe, Mande Gran Moun in Darbonne, Rara La Fleur Ginen in Bel Air, Rara Inorab Kapab in Cite Soleil and Rara Ya Seizi.

Donning traditional Rara costumes, which are known for their delicate sequin work and vivacious colors, dancers are shown in action, in low or high bandwidth videos of dances and music. In one clip, a queen and two kings dance the “mazoun.” Traditional instruments such as bamboo and the paper-fabricated konet are shown in several accompanying images like the one at right.

The music featured on the Web site was produced by Holly Nicolas, postal clerk, and mixed and mastered by Peter Hadley, conductor of Wes Winds.

McAlister, who lived in Haiti to study Rara, says she walked with the bands, took them seriously and listened to what they had to say.

“My book, and now this Web site, tell that story,” she says.

For more information on the Learning Objects Studio go to: http://learningobjects.wesleyan.edu.
 

By Olivia Drake, The Wesleyan Connection editor

The Wesleyan Connection: Campus Snapshot

THE PRESIDENT’S VOICE: Hunter King ’08 uses an audio-recording device to record the voice of President Doug Bennet Dec. 13. King will use Bennet’s voice clips during his surf-music radio program, Storm Surge Of Reverb, which airs from midnight to 1 a.m. Friday mornings on WESU 88.1 FM. King invited Bennet to record after hearing him speak at the High Rise residences. “I noticed that he was speaking in a very cool, very low voice,” King says. “I thought it would be fun if I could have him record a few voice breaks for my show.” (Photo by Olivia Bartlett)
Below are two audio-video clips of the recording:

  

Scholastic Honor Society Welcomes New Members


Wesleyan senior Maggie Arias was one of 15 seniors welcomed to Phi Beta Kappa, the oldest national scholastic honor society during a ceremony Dec. 13. Also pictured, at left, is Gary Yohe, the Woodhouse/Sysco Professor of Economics and PBK secretary;  Mark Hovey, president of the gamma chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, and Jane Tozer, assistant to the vice president of University Relations and PBK treasurer and event coordinator.
Posted 12/20/06
Fifteen Wesleyan students were inducted into the oldest national scholastic honor society, Phi Beta Kappa, during an initiation ceremony Dec. 13.

 

Election is limited to 12 percent of the graduating class, and based on general education expectations and by having a grade point average of 90 or above. Students are nominated by their major departments.

 

“As individuals and as a group, you have contributed a great deal to Wesleyan through your intellectual engagement in the academic work and residential life of the institution,” said President Doug Bennet during the induction ceremony. “Recognizing your accomplishments is certainly one of the highlights of my job and while I won’t claim that my delight exceeds your own, it comes pretty close.”

 

Phi Betta Kappa was founded in 1776, during the American Revolution. The students join the ninth oldest Phi Beta Kappa chapter in the United States—founded in 1845.

 

The organization’s Greek initials signify the motto, “Love of learning is the guide of life.”

 

“I am struck by the breadth and scope of academic interests, and the depth of study reflected across this group,” Bennet said. “A number of you have chosen double majors allowing you to combine those interests in your professional goals.  You have furthered your varied interests through summer activities and internships and research.

 

“Many students excel at Wesleyan, but those of you here today have taken on the challenge of a liberal arts education by investing yourself in everything you do. In a university where academic excellence is common, you stand out. That’s why membership in Phi Beta Kappa is such a singular honor. “

 

The students include:

 

OWEN RANDALL ALBIN, a double major in the American Studies Program and in neuroscience and behavior. Albin sings with the Wesleyan Spirits, one of the oldest all-male a cappella groups in the country. He is also a member of the Wesleyan sketch comedy group, Lunchbox, where he writes comedic skits and acts in them. A senior interviewer for the admission office, Albin and has been a teacher’s assistant for biology and chemistry classes. After graduation he hopes to do a few months of clinical volunteer work somewhere in Africa.

 

MARGARETTE “MAGGIE” ADELINA ARIAS, a psychology major, was inducted into Psi Chi last spring, the Psychology Honor Society. As part of a research team during her sophomore year, she worked closely with a local elementary school to implement a peer mediation program to reduce playground violence.  Three of her four years here at Wesleyan, she has worked at the Edna C. Stevens School in Cromwell in the after-school program, Kids Korner. Her plans include grad school, and plans to go into counseling or clinical social work.

 

HYUNG-JIN CHOI, an economics major, has sung with the a cappella group “Outside-In” for three years and won the intramural basketball championship his sophomore year. A Freeman Scholar, Choi has helped organize events for the Korean Students Association. After graduation Hyung-Jin will return to Korea to serve in the military for two years then plans to go to graduate school and further pursue his studies in economics. 

 

JACK MICHAEL DiSCIACCA carries a double major in mathematics and physics. During his junior year he was awarded a Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship to fund research during the 2006-2007 school year. DiSciacca plans to attend graduate school to study either pure or applied physics.

 

CHRISTINA ANN DURFEE is a double major in mathematics and psychology. While at Wesleyan, Christina won the Robertson Prize and Rae Shortt Prize in mathematics. Her plans for the future remain uncertain, but Durfee is currently debating between going into the actuarial sciences and going to graduate school for math.

 

JACOB STUART GOLDIN is majoring in economics and government. During his sophomore year, Goldin organized a student group that worked with local organizations to push for gay marriage legislation in Connecticut. Eventually he plans to go to law school and/or graduate school in economics.

 

HANNAH GOODWIN-BROWN, a music major, won the Wesleyan Concerto Competition her sophomore year and performed the Elgar Cello Concerto with the Wesleyan orchestra. She went abroad to the Republic of Georgia, something no one at Wesleyan has done before, and was captain of the women’s ultimate Frisbee team. Goodwin-Brown hopes to work with plants in a professional capacity, perhaps getting a degree in either landscape architecture or horticulture.

 

MAXFIELD WESTGATE HEATH, a music major, is an active composer/pianist in several groups of many genres including jazz, rock, and hip-hop. He has recorded several albums and is in the process of recording a debut studio album of his own songs. He plans on studying composition in grad school in preparation for making a living through some combination of writing/recording/performing and teaching. 

 

CHEUK KEI HO, a math and economics major, is a member of the Wesleyan Spirits and has performed extensively on and off campus for the last four years. He is a Freeman Scholar and studied in Italy during his junior year fall semester. He plans to work in the investment banking division of J.P. Morgan Hong Kong after graduation.

 

CHEN-WEI “JACK” HUNG, a double major in economics and French studies, is a native of Taiwan and is a Freeman Scholar. He has learned French as his third language and studied in Grenoble for a semester. Hung was co-chair of the Wesleyan Model United Nations Team representing Slovenia, Hungary, and Malaysia in different MUN (Model United Nation) Conferences. He also served as a resident advisor for a year, taking care of 35 students. After graduation he will go to New York.

 

GRETCHEN MARLIESE KISHBAUCH carries a double major in psychology and science in society. She served as project director on research co-sponsored by Wesleyan’s Department of Psychology and the Middletown branch of the State Department of Children and Families.  During this time she directed a research team of undergraduate and graduate students investigating child maltreatment.  She was awarded membership in Psi Chi, a national psychology honor society.  She is currently co-developing and co-leading a student form on Global Health Issues in the Science in Society Department. Kishbauch plans to pursue graduate study in public health.

 

MANG-JU SHER, a physics major, is a Freeman Scholar. While at Wesleyan she started learning Japanese and violin.  She loves cooking and plans to pursue a Ph.D in physics.

 

BECK LARMON STRALEY is an earth and environmental science major. The bulk of Beck’s energy is currently focused on Venus. When not studying, Straley can be found at a residential life staff meeting, giving tours on campus to prospective students and their families, destroying the “gender binary,” or running.

 

ZHAOXUAN “CHARLES” YANG, an economics and mathematics major from China is a Freeman Scholar. Yang was captain of the Ping Pong Club for two years, co-chair of the Chinese Students Association, and a resident assistant. After graduation, Yang will be working for J.P Morgan Securities in their Hong Kong Office.

 

KEVIN ALAN YOUNG is a double major in history and Latin American studies.  During his time at Wesleyan, Kevin has taught 6th and 7th graders at Summerbridge Cambridge in two six-week courses in literature and a self-designed social studies class on the Vietnam War. He also served as a faculty advisor and organized a camping excursion for 75 students and 20 teachers. He has been a Big Brother volunteer, mentoring a nine-year-old boy.  On campus, Kevin has been active in United Student Labor Action Coalition, Students for Ending the War in Iraq, Nagarote-Wesleyan Partnership, and English as a Second Language. Young studied abroad in Nicaragua, and he received a Davenport Grant to spend nine weeks in Chiapas and Oaxaca in southeastern Mexico conducting research on popular education programs.  Young’s future includes graduate school in Latin American history and hopes to teach at the college and/or high school level.

 

To view additional photos go to the Wesleyan Connection’s Campus Snapshot section at http://www.wesleyan.edu/newsletter/snapshot/2006/1206phibetakappa.html.
 

By Olivia Drake, The Wesleyan Connection editor

Betty Tishler Celebrates 97th Birthday at Wesleyan


Pictured at top, from left, Gina Driscoll, associate director of stewardship, Penny Apter; Betty Tishler, and Philip Bolton, chair of the Chemistry Department and professor of chemistry. Pictured at left, President Doug Bennet reads a Proclamation to Tishler. (Photos by Olivia Drake and  by Roslyn Carrier-Brault)
Posted 12/20/06
Betty Tishler, wife of the late Professor Max Tishler, celebrated her 97th birthday Dec. 14 in the Exley Science Center. Tishler’s family and friends, Wesleyan affiliates and students attended.

During the two-hour party, President Doug Bennet presented Tishler with a Mayor’s Proclamation that acknowledged Tishler for her contributions to the greater Middletown community.

Tishler, who was married to Max Tishler for 55 years until his death in 1989, raised two sons, Peter and Carl, and has three grandchildren.

She was a partner in her husband’s productive and distinguished career at Merck pharmaceuticals from 1937 to 1970. Max Tishler led the development of new drugs and vitamins, which culminated in his receipt of the Presidential Medal of Honor from President Reagan. His developments included products for heart disease, hypertension, rheumatoid arthritis, mental depression and infectious diseases.

The Tishlers came to Middletown in 1970. They had an immediate and lasting impact on Wesleyan, especially the Chemistry Department, to which Betty Tishler remains especially devoted today.

She has established prizes at Wesleyan for art, music and for an annual piano competition, and most recently a Research Chair in Medicinal Chemistry in honor of her late husband.

In addition, she is a regular and generous supporter of the Middlesex County United Way.

Over the past 36 years, Tishler’s vitality, resilience, curiosity, generosity, and engagement have marked her as a special citizen of Wesleyan and Middletown.

The Wesleyan Connection’s Campus News 2006

Posted 12/20/06
Professor, Student Study Children’s Ability to Count

Posted 12/20/06
Online Incite Magazine Pushes Readers to Take Actions

Posted 12/20/06
Students Compete in National Putnam Math Competition

Posted 12/20/06
Betty Tishler Celebrates 97th Birthday at Wesleyan

Posted 12/20/06
Students Inducted into Scholastic Honor Society Phi Beta Kappa

Posted 12/20/06
Students, Faculty, Alumni Present Papers at Ethnomusicology Conference

Posted 12/20/06
Wesleyan University Press Receives NEA Grant

Posted 12/04/06
Wesleyan Receives State Stem Cell Grants

Posted 12/04/06
Grant Targets Treatment of Epileptic Seizures

Posted 12/04/06
Wesleyan Students Pedal for Affordable Housing

Posted 12/04/06
Scott Plous Named CASE Professor of the Year

Posted 12/04/06
Men’s Cross Country Competes at Nationals for Second Straight Year

Posted 12/04/06
Former Wesleyan Professor Burton Hallowell Dies

Posted 11/17/06
Faculty Receive Fulbright Scholar Grants

Posted 11/17/06
Men’s Soccer Winning Streak Ends at Tourney

Posted 11/17/06
Goldsmith Family Cinema to be Dedicated

Posted 11/17/06
Residential Life Staff Honored by National Organization

Posted 11/17/06
Report Shows Impact of Digital Imaging on College Teaching, Learning

Posted 11/17/06
Middlesex United Way Campaign Begins, Wesleyan Sets Goal at $143,000

Posted 11/01/06
Dana Royer Researches Plant Characteristics During Global Warming

Posted 11/01/06
Economics Professors Take on Role of Editors for National Journal

Posted 11/01/06
Global Warming Topic of Schumann Symposium

Posted 11/01/06
Wesleyan a Top Fulbright Scholar Producer

Posted 11/01/06
Former Trainer Walter Grockowski Dies at 86

Posted 10/05/06
Scientists Share Research at Biophysics Retreat

Posted 10/05/06
Presidential Search Forum Provides Insight

Posted 10/05/06
Wes Home Program Teaches Home Maintenance

Posted 10/05/06
City of Middletown Honors Wesleyan’s 175th

Posted 10/05/06
Presidential Search Committee Formed

Posted 10/05/06
Payroll Going Paperless

Posted 10/05/06
Voices of Liberal Learning Examine Issues that Shape Our World

Posted 10/05/06
Chapel Receives New Seven-Foot Piano

Posted 10/05/06
Wesleyan Celebrates 100 Years of Hosting Government Documents

Posted 09/15/06
Wesleyan, Science Center Forge Partnership

Posted 09/15/06
Presidential Search Committee Forming

Posted 09/15/06
Definitive Strength Moves Online with Drew Black

Posted 09/15/06
Wesleyan Ranked in Several Top 10 Lists

Posted 09/15/06
Faculty, Students offer Reflections at Sept. 11 Memorial

Posted 09/15/06
Fall Features Lecture Series on Slavery, Distinguished Presenter

Posted 09/15/06
Libraries and the Constitution after 9/11 Topic of Constitution Day

Posted 09/15/06
David Titus, Professor Emeritus of Government, Dies

Posted 08/24/06
Annual Hughes Poster Session Big Success

Posted 08/24/06
Physics Professor Tom Morgan Studies Exotic Atoms

Posted 08/24/06
Wesleyan Hires Dean for Diversity

Posted 08/24/06
Art Created on Gallery’s Walls

Posted 08/24/06
Wesleyan Receives $500,000 Challenge Grant from Kresge Foundation

Posted 08/24/06
Committee to Prepare Campus for Crisis, Disaster

Posted 08/24/06
Memorial Service Planned for David McAllester Sept. 24

Posted 08/24/06
Noah Simring ’07 Dies

Posted 07/28/06
Research Team Studies Bioluminescent Bays

Posted 07/28/06
Kay Butterfield Has 100th Birthday at Wesleyan

Posted 07/28/06
Wesleyan Breaks Fund-Raising Record with $35M

Posted 07/28/06
Iberian Studies Major Unveiled this Fall

Posted 07/28/06
Summer Institute on U.S. Citizenship, Race

Posted 07/28/06
Students, Alumni Bring Fatal Fire Story to Life through Play

Posted 07/06/06
Summer Programs Extend Learning Year-Round

Posted 07/06/06
Athletes Named NESCAC All-Academics

Posted 06/16/06
Seniors Start Web Site to Spur Balanced Political Dialogue

Posted 06/16/06
Bennet Attends International Forum on Education

Posted 06/16/06
Professors, Alumni Rock NYC with Tubas

Posted 06/16/06
Wesleyan Busy with Summer Projects

Posted 05/28/06
Class of 2006 Receives Degrees

Posted 05/28/06
President Bennet Delivers Commencement Address

Posted 05/28/06
John Hope Franklin Receives Honorary Doctor of Letter

Posted 05/28/06
Higher Education Innovator, Leader Dies at 72

Posted 05/28/06
“Wesleyan Through the Years” on Display

Posted 05/28/06
Men’s Lacrosse is NCAA Semi-Finalist

Posted 05/28/06
Connecticut Math Teachers Attend Leadership Academy

Posted 05/28/06
Saving Energy All Summer Long

Posted 05/16/06
Service Learning Projects Focus on Community

Posted 05/16/06
258 Students Honored at Awards Reception

Posted 05/16/06
Digital Images Topic of Workshop for Staff

Posted 05/16/06
Students Embrace Jewish Community at Wesleyan B’nei Mitzvah

Posted 05/16/06
AIDS Crisis, Disasters Explored in Upcoming CFA Season

Posted 05/16/06
Sophie Pollitt-Cohen ’09 is Co-Author of The Notebook Girls

Posted 05/04/06
Wesleyan President Bennet to Step Down

Posted 05/04/06
Poster Session Celebrates Thesis Projects

Posted 05/04/06
John Meerts New Vice President for Finance

Posted 05/04/06
Joseph Bruno Promoted to Vice President for Academic Affairs

Posted 05/04/06
Wesleyan’s Turf Field Dedicated at Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

Posted 05/04/06
More than 10,000 Books on Sale for Library Benefit

Posted 05/04/06
Apply for Wesleyan Staff Positions Online

Posted 04/17/06
Student, Professor Collaborate on Brain Study

Posted 04/17/06
Jeff Maier ’06 Breaks Team Record in Baseball

Posted 04/17/06
Breaking Down the Barriers in Middle East

Posted 04/17/06
“We Are Family” Theme of Alumni of Color Reunion

Posted 04/17/06
Lecture, Food Politics Week Part of Earth Week Celebration

Posted 04/17/06
Winter Athletes Honored at Reception

Posted 04/17/06
Wesleyan’s Long Lane Farm Growing Up and Out

Posted 04/17/06
Economics Professor Gary Yohe Testifies Before U.S. Senate

Posted 04/01/06
No Break this Spring: Wesleyan Students Donate Time-Off to Help Others

Posted 04/01/06
Dana Royer’s Study Gives Teeth to Leaf Activity

Posted 04/01/06
Fauver Takes First Place in Building Competition

Posted 04/01/06
Honorary Degrees, Medals Awarded during 174th Commencement

Posted 04/01/06
Science Explored through Series of Films, Discussion

Posted 03/15/06
Campus Safety Upgrades Continue

Posted 03/15/06
4 Faculty Awarded Career Grants

Posted 03/15/06
WesGuitars Strummin’ Worldly Music

Posted 03/01/06
Ellen Thomas Explored Climate Change in Deep Sea Biota

Posted 03/01/06
Wrestler Wins NECCWA Championship

Posted 03/01/06
Project $ave Finds Savings from Wesleyan Community

Posted 03/01/06
Board Approves Tuition, Fee Increases

Posted 03/01/06
Local Students Get Taste of East Asian Culture

Posted 03/01/06
Recycle Maniacs at Wesleyan

Posted 02/16/06
Basketball Players Tutor Students at Green Street

Posted 02/16/06
Grant Supports Professor’s Research on DNA, RNA Structure and Dynamics

Posted 02/16/06
Grant will Support Lecture Series on Ethics, Politics, Society

Posted 02/16/06
Provost Steps Down, Will Continue Teaching, Research

Posted 02/16/06
Neuroscience and Behavior Alumni Offer Research, Advice

Posted 02/01/06
Steven Devoto Finds Fish May Help Unmask Muscle Diseases

Posted 02/01/06
President Attends Summit on Education

Posted 02/01/06
Wesleyan A Player in Stem Cell Initiative

Posted 02/01/06
“Ferocious Beauty: Genome” World Premier Feb. 3 and 4

Posted 02/01/06
Diversity, Gender Topic of Affirmative Action Workshop

Posted 02/01/06
Trustee Emeritus Richard Couper Dies

Posted 01/17/06
Professor William Herbst, Student, Share Star Power

Posted 01/17/06
Student, Alumna Help AIDS Orphans

Posted 01/17/06
Ergonomics Target Workplace Strain, Pain

Posted 01/17/06
Turf’s Up! New Synthetic Field to Open in Spring

Posted 01/17/06
Bible Studies, Buddhist Meditations, Mass and More During 10th Annual Spirituality Week

Students Receive Fellowships to Continue Research on Seizures, Genetics


Matthew Donne ’07, Jenna Gopilan ’07 and Dan Austin ’08 received fellowships based on academic achievement and enthusiasm for laboratory science.
 
Posted 12/20/06
Three Wesleyan students received research bioscience fellowships from the Connecticut Business & Industry Association (CBIA) and the Connecticut United for Research Excellence (CURE). The fellowships are designed to increase the number of qualified scientists interested in pursuing careers in the biosciences.

Molecular biology and biochemistry major Dan Austin ’08; neuroscience and behavior major Jenna Gopilan ’07; and biology major Matthew Donne ’07 each received the $5,000 fellowship. The students were selected on the basis of academic achievement, enthusiasm for laboratory science and interest in pursuing a career in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, or biomedical manufacturing industry.

Austin and Gopilan work under the direction of Jan Naegele, chair of the Biology Department, professor of biology and professor of neuroscience and behavior. Donne works under the direction of Laura Grabel, the Fisk Professor of Natural Science and professor of biology.

Austin, of Williston, Vt., will examine how a brain-specific enzyme called STEP, influences
the vulnerability of hippocampal neurons injured by seizures. One type of hippocampal neuron that produces STEP is thought to act as the “brakes” to prevent excessive excitation and seizures. These STEP-containing neurons are among the earliest cells to die in seizures, and preventing their death might be a way to limit seizure activity. He will use cultures made from the hippocampus of STEP knockout mice or wildtype mice to study whether STEP-deficient neurons survive excitotoxic damage better than neurons containing STEP.

“It is our hypothesis that the presence or absence of certain proteins dictates which cells survive in the brain,” Austin says. “We hope that this project may contribute to determining a new therapeutic approach to treat epilepsy.”

Gopilan, of Los Angeles, Calif., also aims to understand seizures. With the CURE grant, she will continue her research on “The Role of Serotonin in Adult Neurogenesis in the Hippocampus of Wildtype and DNA Repair Deficient Mice.”

Gopilan will use an epilepsy model in mice to study how neural stem cells respond to damage caused by epileptic seizures. Previous work in the Naegele laboratory showed that seizures produce a strong increase in the production of new neurons in the adult brain, from populations of neural stem cells located in the hippocampus. The mice she studies lack a DNA repair protein that may be critical for maintaining neural stem cell populations in the brain. This research study will help her understand how DNA repair, serotonin and seizures interact to regulate stem cells. Gopilan will extract neural stem cells from the hippocampus after seizures and grow them in tissue culture to define serotonin’s effect on the birth and growth of hippocampal neurons.

“This project will be beneficial in recognizing the different factors involved in repairing the brains of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy,” Gopilan explains.

Donne, of Litchfield, Conn., hopes to use his fellowship to characterize the extraembryonic cell types present in human embryonic stem cell embryoid bodies and to generate outgrowth cultures on different extracellular matrix substrates that reflect in vivo conditions. To determine the cell types present, Donne will be using immunohistochemistry and specific cell type markers.

“Such research in the future can be applied to determining the specific genetic basis for miscarriages and other early fetal or placenta relationships,” Donne says.

Austin, Gopilan and Donne are three of 10 students from Wesleyan, the University of Connecticut and the University of New Haven, to receive the fellowships. Results of their research will be presented at StemCONN 07, Connecticut’s Stem Cell Research International Symposium, to be held at the State Capitol on March 27, 2007.

The fellowship program is made possible through a U.S. Department of Labor H-1B grant being administered by CBIA. The CBIA is Connecticut’s largest business organization with 10,000 members. CURE is a statewide coalition of over 100 educational and research institutions, biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies and other supporting businesses.

Both organizations are dedicated to promoting the growth of research and science in Connecticut.

“This fellowship program helps Connecticut continue to have the highly educated workforce needed to remain competitive in bioscience, while keeping the brightest students in the state,” says Judith Resnick, CBIA director of workforce development and training, and the deputy director of the association’s Education Foundation.
 

By Olivia Drake, The Wesleyan Connection editor