Snapshots

Students Prepare for Final Exams, Winter Recess

On Dec. 11, Caroline Kravitz '19 studied for her HIST 203 Modern Europe exam at Exley Science Center. "My finals aren't until next Saturday, but I want to get a good head start," she said. "I like to study alone at first to prepare, but then I prefer to study in groups because you can learn so much more from your peers."

On Dec. 11, Caroline Kravitz ’19 studied for her HIST 203 Modern Europe exam at Exley Science Center. “My finals aren’t until next Saturday, but I want to get a good head start,” she said. “I like to study alone at first to prepare, but then I prefer to study in groups because you can learn so much more from your peers.”

This week, in preparation for final exams, hundreds of students are flooding Olin Library, Science Library, Exley Science Center, Usdan University Center and other quiet spots seeking an area to study in solitude, while others are collaborating with classmates in groups.

Undergraduate and graduate classes ended on Dec. 8. Reading Period was held Dec. 9-12 and final exams end at 5 p.m. Dec. 16.

University housing closes on Dec. 17 and re-opens on Jan. 23, 2018, and spring semester classes for Wesleyan undergraduates and graduates begins on Jan. 25. Graduate Liberal Studies courses begin on Jan. 29.

Wesleyan RJ Julia Bookstore Decorates, Hosts Events for the Holidays

This December, the Wesleyan RJ Julia Bookstore is decorated for the holidays and has a festive line up of activities and gifts for sale.

Santa Claus will read How the Grinch Stole Christmas! at the Wesleyan RJ Julia Bookstore on Dec. 16.

Santa Claus will read How the Grinch Stole Christmas! at the Wesleyan RJ Julia Bookstore on Dec. 16.

“Some of the most popular gifts this season are ‘Wesleyan’ embroidered fleece and sherpa jackets and the adorable knit Cardinal scarf with matching hat,” said RJ Julia Events Manager Liz Bartek. “Sweatshirts are always popular and students are buying W mugs and Moleskin journals to help prepare for exams.”

The bookstore hosted a Santa Letter Writing Workshops on Nov. 25 and Dec. 2. And on Dec. 7, the bookstore hosted a Holiday Appreciation Day for Wesleyan faculty and staff. Employees enjoyed refreshments while browsing the bookstore’s holiday catalog selections.

On Dec. 9, children were treated to a visit by City of Middletown Police Chief Bill McKenna and Don Freeman’s classic character, Corduroy the Bear. McKenna read stories, and at the end of the reading, Corduroy hosted a book signing party. Since 1968, this story of a small teddy bear waiting on a department store shelf for a child’s friendship has appealed to young readers generation after generation.

On Dec. 16, Santa Claus will read Dr. Seuss’s How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, and at the end of the reading, The Grinch will hold a book signing Read more.

Photos of the bookstore are below: (Photos by Caroline Kravitz ’19 and Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19)

Panel Addresses “Islamophobia in the Age of Trump”

The Wesleyan Refugee Project hosted a faculty panel on "Islamophobia in the Age of Trump" Dec. 7.

The Wesleyan Refugee Project hosted a panel discussion on “Islamophobia in the Age of Trump” on Dec. 7 in Usdan Univesity Center. Speakers included Peter Gottschalk, professor of religion, professor of science in society, director of the Office of Faculty Career Development; Patricia Rodriguez Mosquera, associate professor of psychology, associate professor of feminist, gender and sexuality studies; and Muslim Chaplain Sami Aziz.

Campus Glows during Early Evening Hours

As the northern hemisphere nears the winter solstice (Dec. 21), the Wesleyan community acclimates to shorter days. Pictured are scenes of campus between 5 and 5:30 p.m. on Dec. 6:

Foss Hill and the Van Vleck Observatory.

Foss Hill and the Van Vleck Observatory.

Davison Art Center.

Davison Art Center.

Students Teach DNA, Self-Awareness Workshops to Local Children

On Nov. 30, Alex Shames '18, Alison Biester '19, Sojeong Park '18, Alexa Strauss '19 and Mikaela Carty '18, who belong to the Molecular and Biochemistry Department's undergraduate student group Major Groove, lead workshops on DNA.

Wesleyan students recently hosted special 1/2 day programs for the Green Street Arts Center AfterSchool students. On Nov. 30, Alex Shames ’18 (pictured), Alison Biester ’19, Sojeong Park ’18, Alexa Strauss ’19 and Mikaela Carty ’18, who belong to the Molecular and Biochemistry Department’s undergraduate student group Major Groove, led workshops on DNA.

McKee Leads Graduate Series Discussion on Fossils, Climate’s Effect on Leaves

BA/MA student Melissa McKee, who is pursuing a MA in earth and environmental sciences, delivered a talk during the Graduate Student Speakers Series on Nov. 29. McKee’s talk was titled “Looking to the past to predict the future: Restoring the fossil collections at Wesleyan’s Joe Webb Peoples Museum and testing the accuracy of using fossil leaves to estimate past temperatures.” McKee spent the summer working on restoring and cataloging a fossil collection for Wesleyan’s Joe Webb Peoples Museum of Natural History. “This work paired perfectly with my research, which tests the assumptions of models that use the size and shape of fossilized leaves to reconstruct the mean annual temperature of ancient environments,” she said.

BA/MA student Melissa McKee, who is pursuing a MA in earth and environmental sciences, delivered a talk during the Graduate Student Speakers Series on Nov. 29. McKee’s talk was titled “Looking to the past to predict the future: Restoring the fossil collections at Wesleyan’s Joe Webb Peoples Museum and testing the accuracy of using fossil leaves to estimate past temperatures.” McKee spent the summer working on restoring and cataloging a fossil collection for Wesleyan’s Joe Webb Peoples Museum of Natural History. “This work paired perfectly with my research, which tests the assumptions of models that use the size and shape of fossilized leaves to reconstruct the mean annual temperature of ancient environments,” she said.

Political Anthropologist Vine ’97 Speaks to Campus Community about Military Overseas under Trump

On Nov. 9, political anthropologist David Vine '97, associate professor of anthropology at American University, returned to campus to speak on ""What Are We Getting Out of This?": U.S. Empire and the Military Overseas under Trump." Vine is the author of Base Nation: How US Military Bases Abroad Harm America and the World and Island of Shame: The Secret History of the U.S. Military Base on Diego Garcia. His other writings have appeared in the Washington Post, the New York Times, Guardian, and Mother Jones.

On Nov. 9, political anthropologist David Vine ’97, associate professor of anthropology at American University, returned to campus to speak on “What Are We Getting Out of This?”: U.S. Empire and the Military Overseas under Trump.” The U.S. has 800 military bases in places from Germany and Japan to South Korea and Saudi Arabia and nearly 80 other countries.

Wesleyan Celebrates 23rd Year of Freeman Asian Scholars Program

On Nov. 3, Wesleyan’s Freeman Asian Scholars gathered for group photos and dinner. The Freeman Scholars Program annually provides expenses for a four-year course of study toward a BA for up to 11 exceptional Asian students from these countries and regions: the People’s Republic of China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.

On Nov. 3, Wesleyan’s Freeman Asian Scholars gathered for group photos and dinner. The Freeman Scholars Program provides scholarships annually to 11 exceptional Asian students from these countries and regions: the People’s Republic of China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam. The Freeman Program was established in 1995 through the generosity of the Freeman family – Mansfield Freeman ’16, Houghton Freeman ’43, P’77, Hon ’93, Doreen Freeman P’77, Hon ’03 and Graeme Freeman ’77.

Wesleyan’s Vocal Talent Showcased at Stone A Cappella Concert

Once called the “singing college of New England,” Wesleyan still boasts strong musical traditions. On Nov. 5, multiple student groups performed at the 7th Annual Stone A Cappella Concert held in Memorial Chapel. The concert, held in conjunction with Homecoming/Family Weekend, provides an extraordinary showcase of the vocal talent and stage presence of Wesleyan undergraduates.

The performance is sponsored by the Charles B. Stone Jr. A Cappella Fund, which was established through the generosity of Sarah Stone Maynard ’79, P’11 and Fred Maynard ’80, P’11. It honors of Sarah’s father, Chip Stone ’49, P’79, P’82, GP’11, GP’15, and celebrates the Stone family’s long Wesleyan legacy.

Photos of the concert are below: (Photos by Caroline Kravitz ’19 and Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19)

Shasha Seminar Explores the Role of Guns in America

The 16th Annual Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns, held Oct. 27–28 on campus, convened experts, including Wesleyan alumni, from across the country to examine current debates about the role of guns in American history, society, law and politics. The Shasha Seminar is an educational forum for Wesleyan alumni, parents and friends that provides an opportunity to explore issues of global concern in a small seminar environment. Endowed by James Shasha ’50, P’82, the Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns supports lifelong learning and encourages participants to expand their knowledge and perspectives on significant issues.

Seminar organizer Jennifer Tucker, associate professor of history and associate professor of science in society at Wesleyan, noted in a previous article that “Firearms possession is possibly one of the most divisive topics in the country.” Her goal was for the event to “create a forum for conversations about current gun ownership and laws with room for a variety of perspectives on this topic. We want for this university seminar to be a forum for discussions and a meeting point for current research about firearms possession and use from a number of different fields,” she said.

The 16th Annual Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns, held Oct. 27-28 on campus, convened experts, including Wesleyan alumni, from different fields across the country to examine current debates about the role of guns in American history, society, law and politics. The Shasha Seminar is an educational forum for Wesleyan alumni, parents, and friends that provides an opportunity to explore issues of global concern in a small seminar environment. Endowed by James Shasha '50, P'82, the Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns supports lifelong learning and encourages participants to expand their knowledge and perspectives on significant issues.

Beginning in Memorial Chapel on Friday afternoon with a keynote speech by Richard Slotkin, Olin Professor of English and American Studies, Emeritus (see photo below), the weekend proved to be a venue for education, questions and much discussion on concerns surrounding guns in American society.

Richard Slotkin, the Olin Professor of American Studies, Emeritus, delivered the keynote address titled “Open Season: The Gun Rights Movement and American Political Culture.” Slotkin discussed the current struggle over firearms legislation and how it has been shaped by a political movement, which links a radical understanding of “gun rights” to the agendas of American conservatism.

Richard Slotkin, the Olin Professor of English and American Studies, Emeritus, delivered the keynote address titled “Open Season: The Gun Rights Movement and American Political Culture.” Slotkin discussed the current struggle over firearms legislation and how it has been shaped by a political movement, which links a radical understanding of “gun rights” to the agendas of American conservatism.

Belichick Plaza Dedicated in Recognition of the Leadership, Generosity of Bill ’75, P’07, Hon. ’05 and Amanda Belichick ’07

New England Patriots Head Coach Bill Belichick ’75, P’07, Hon. ’05 and his daughter, Amanda Belichick ’07, visited campus during Homecoming/Family Weekend on Nov. 3. After greeting and speaking to members of the Wesleyan football team, the Belichicks attended a reception at the Belichick Plaza (formerly Warren Street lobby), dedicated in recognition of the leadership and generosity of Bill and Amanda Belichick. (Photos and information by Olivia Drake, Cynthia Rockwell and Tom Dzimian)

Bill and Amanda Belichick joined Whalen, Morea and Wesleyan President Michael Roth in a ribbon cutting ceremony to officially acknowledge the inside the newly-named Belichick Plaza

Bill and Amanda Belichick, center, joined Mike Whalen, the Frank V. Sica Director of Athletics; Board of Trustees Chair Donna Morea ’76, P’06 and Wesleyan President Michael Roth in a ribbon cutting ceremony to officially acknowledge the newly-named Belichick Plaza. “The great thing about this school and what this building stands for is that at Wesleyan, we have student athletes here. You don’t have to choose between being a student or being an athlete; you can be both,” Bill Belichick said during the Belichick Plaza dedication. “That’s what I was looking for in college, and that’s what Amanda was looking for — to participate in intercollegiate athletics and also be challenged at a high level academically. Here, you really can do both.”