Tag Archive for climate

Wesleyan Honored for Climate Change Efforts

Bill Nelligan, director of environmental health, safety and sustainability, delivers the opening remarks at the 2010 Climate Change Leadership Awards Ceremony June 7 in Kerr Lecture Hall. Wesleyan was one of seven individuals and organizations honored by Connecticut Governor M. Jodi Rell for its innovative efforts to address global climate change.

Faculty Examine Issues Surrounding “Climategate” Report

A presentation titled, “After Climategate: Rethinking Climate Science and Climate Policy” was held March 25 in the Public Affairs Center. Faculty panelists examined a variety of issues surrounding the recent news media accounts known as “Climategate” which impugned some of the findings of the IPPC’s 4th Assessment Report.

A presentation titled, “After Climategate: Rethinking Climate Science and Climate Policy” was held March 25 in the Public Affairs Center. Faculty panelists examined a variety of issues surrounding the recent news media accounts known as “Climategate” which impugned some of the findings of the IPPC’s 4th Assessment Report.

Yohe Discusses Copenhagen Climate Change Conference

Gary Yohe, Woodhouse/Sysco Professor of Economics, and senior member of the United Nations’ International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), discusses in a Dec. 6 issue of  The Los Angeles Times the possibilities at the U.N.’s Climate Change Conference In Copenhagen, Denmark.

In the article, Yohe says that “many nations would like to see a definitive agreement come out of the Copenhagen conference. But in the absence of climate legislation passed by the U.S. Congress, it is unlikely we will see anything like a binding treaty. Still, significant progress is possible.

Copenhagen offers the prospect of agreement on a number of structural issues. First would be establishing ways to facilitate technology transfer while preserving intellectual property rights. Another possibility is agreement on ways of integrating nationally specific climate policies into future global programs. The conference could also put in place funding mechanisms for developed countries to aid developing countries in finding methods of mitigating and adapting to the consequences of climate change.

These more technical areas offer many opportunities through which the United States can begin to be seen as part of the solution.”

Blakemore ’65 Speaks on Psychologies of Global Warming

Bill Blakemore '65, an ABC News Correspondent, will speak on "The Many Psychologies of Global Warming," during a talk at 8 p.m. Nov. 3 in Memorial Chapel.

Bill Blakemore '65, an ABC News Correspondent, will speak on "The Many Psychologies of Global Warming," during a talk at 8 p.m. Nov. 3 in Memorial Chapel.

Four weeks before the nations meet in Copenhagen to try to avert the catastrophes that global warming may bring, ABC News Correspondent William Blakemore ’65 will identify many surprising psychological factors at play as people in all walks of life deal with the latest “hard news” on climate.

Blakemore will speak on “The Many Psychologies of Global Warming,” during a talk at 8 p.m. Nov. 3 in Memorial Chapel.

He’ll explore new definitions of sanity that may pertain, and give examples displaying different “psychologies, as well as manmade global warming’s place in “the long history of narcissistic insults to humanity itself.”

Two new time-line graphs of rapid and dangerous climate change will give fresh global context to the psychological challenges and experiences he has observed in the five years since he began focusing on global warming for ABC News.

Computer modelers trying to project the speed and severity of global warming’s advance often say that “the biggest unknown” in their equations is not data about ice or atmosphere, carbon or clouds, but “what the humans will do.” This talk probes that field and many states of mind already engaged.

The talk is sponsored by the Wasch Center for Retired Faculty, Department of Psychology, and the Robert Schumann Lecture Series in the Environmental Studies Program.

A follow-up discussion will be held at 4 p.m. Nov. 4 in the Wasch Center on Lawn Ave.

Freshwater Resources Topic of Where On Earth Are We Going Symposium

Patrick Osborne

Patrick Osborne, executive director of the Whitney R. Harris World Ecology Center at the University of Missouri - St. Louis, will speak on climate change during the Where on Earth Are We Going symposium Nov. 7.

During the last 50 years, humans have degraded rivers and lakes through excessive water abstraction, pollution and by over-harvesting aquatic organisms. River flow has been impeded by dams, and floodplains have been converted for agriculture and urban areas.

The human population has doubled to nearly 7 billion and, per capita water availability has declined on all continents. During the past 50 years, global climate change has further impacted water resources.

On Nov. 7, three climate experts will speak on “Global Environmental Change And Freshwater Resources: Hope For The Best Or Change To Prepare For The Worst?” during the annual Where On Earth Are We Going? Symposium. The event is sponsored by the Robert Schumann Lecture Series in the Environmental Studies Program.

At 9 a.m., Patrick L. Osborne, executive director of the Harris World Ecology Center at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, will look at ways climate change and global warming have altered river and lake function and the water resources on which humans rely. He has 30 years experience in tropical ecology research, education and environmental consultancy and was the head of the biology department at the University of Papua New Guinea and deputy director of the Water Research Center at the University of Western Sydney in Australia.

At 10:15 a.m., Frank H. McCormick, program manager of Air, Water and Aquatic Environments at the Rocky Mountain Research Station,

Yohe Elected to Governor’s Climate Committee

Gary Yohe, the Woodhouse/Sysco Professor of Economics.

Gary Yohe, the Woodhouse/Sysco Professor of Economics.

Gary Yohe, the Woodhouse/Sysco Professor of Economics, has been appointed to the Adaptation Subcommittee of the Connecticut Governor’s Steering Committee on Climate Change, 2008-2010.

He also has been selected to be a member of the National Research Council Committee on America’s Climate Choices: Panel on Adapting to the Impacts of Climate Change, 2008-2011. The panel will host a Climate Summit in DC at the end of March and provide Congress and the Administration a review of the panel’s “Choices” by the end of the year. A synthetic blueprint will then be created by an umbrella panel.

Yohe also helped organize an Institute of Medicine Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research and Medicine in Washington, DC. It focused on climate change to inform the research agenda of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. In addition, Yohe moderated a session and gave a talk on “Economic Analysis of a Basic and Applied Research Agenda: Strategies for Prioritization” on Jan. 16.

Senior to Represent US at UN Conference on Climate Change

Eli Allen '09 is a member of the U.S. Youth Network for Sustainable Development delegation. (Photo by Intisar Abioto '09)

Eli Allen '09 is a member of the U.S. Youth Network for Sustainable Development delegation. (Photo by Intisar Abioto '09)

Eli Allen ’09 will join youth leaders from across the country to represent the United States at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, 14th Conference of Parties. The event will be held Dec. 23 in Poznan, Poland.

“My generation will ultimately be responsible for the effects of the decisions made at the negotiations, so it is imperative that we be involved and have representation,” says Allen, a College of Social Studies major. “I hope to express the urgency of this moment in our history, where we must realize our common responsibility to protect the most vulnerable members of our world community from the potentially overwhelming burdens of climate change.”

Climate Change Topic of Photography Exhibit

NAME speaks about her photograph titled "NAME" during the opening reception for the exhibit <i>Photographic Window on Causes of Climate Change</i> Nov. 5 in Van Vleck Observatory.

Erin Arai, a graduate student in astronomy, speaks about her photograph of a commuter rail station during the opening reception for the exhibit Photographic Window on Causes of Climate Change Nov. 5 in Van Vleck Observatory. All photographs in the show were taken by students enrolled in Astronomical Pedagogy Seminar, and exhibited waste and carbon use excesses.

Climate Policy Topic of Environmental Symposium

The topic of “Climate Policy: A Progress Report” is the theme of the Fourth Annual Robert Schumann Environmental Studies Symposium “Where on Earth are we Going?” which will be held on Oct. 18.  The event begins at 8:30 a.m. in Exley Science Center Room 150, the Tischler Lecture Hall.