Tag Archive for James McGuire

McGuire Authors Chapter on Democracy, Political Regimes

James McGuire and Guillermo O'Donnell in 1985.

James McGuire and Guillermo O’Donnell in 1985.

Professor of Government James McGuire is the author of a book chapter titled “Democracy, Agency and the Classification of Political Regimes,” published in Reflections on Uneven Democracies: The Legacy of Guillermo O’Donnell by Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014.

Guillermo O’Donnell (1936-2011) was widely recognized as the world’s leading scholar of Latin American politics. During his doctoral studies, McGuire worked closely with O’Donnell in both Argentina and the United States, translating from Spanish to English O’Donnell’s Bureaucratic Authoritarianism: Argentina, 1966-1973, in Comparative Perspective (University of California Press, 1988).

McGuire’s chapter in this new volume commemorating O’Donnell’s life and work argues that schemes for classifying political regimes in Latin America could be improved by defining democracy in a way that gives more priority to human agency, and thereby to the opportunity to lead a thoughtfully chosen life; by recognizing that democracy affects social and political outcomes not only through electoral competition, but also through the freedoms of expression and organization, as well as through long-term cultural changes; and by applying contemporary rather than past standards to decide whether a country meets the operational criteria for democracy.

 

 

Government’s Dancey, Fowler, Gallarotti, Lim, McGuire, Rutland, Schwartz, Wiliarty Published in 2013

Logan Dancey,  assistant professor of government, is the co-author of  “Heuristics Behaving Badly: Party Cues and Voter Knowledge,” published in American Journal of Political Science 57 No. 2, 312-325, April 2013.

Erika Franklin Fowler, assistant professor of government, is the co-author of  “Political and News Media Factors Shaping Public Awareness of the HPV Vaccine,” published in Women’s Health Issues 23 No. 3, e143-e151, 2013.

Giulio Gallarotti, professor of government, professor of environmental studies, tutor in the College of Social Studies,  is the author of “The Enduring Importance of Hobbes in the Study of IR,” published in e-International Relations, Jan. 10, 2013.

Elvin Lim, associate professor of government, is the author of “The Anti-Federalist Strand in Progressive Politics,” published in Political Research Quarterly, 66 No. 1, 32-45, March 2013.

James McGuire, chair and professor of government, professor of Latin American studies, is the author of  “Political Regime and Social Performance,” published in Contemporary Politics, 19 No. 1, 55-75, March 2013.

Peter Rutland, the Colin and Nancy Campbell Professor in Global Issues and Democratic Thought, professor of government, professor of Russian and Eastern European studies, tutor in the College of Social Studies, is the author of “Neoliberalism and the Russian Transition,” published in Review of International Political Economy20 No. 2, 332-362, April 2013.

Nancy Schwartz, professor of government, tutor in the college of social studies, is the author of “Introduction: Generations,” published in  Polity 45 No. 2, 245-248, April 2013.

Sarah Wiliarty, associate professor of government, director of the Public Affairs Center, is the author of “Nuclear Power in Germany and France,” published in Polity 45 No. 2, 281-296, April 2013.

McGuire’s Book Chapter, Article Published in Latin American, Politics Publications

James McGuire

James McGuire, professor and chair of government, professor of Latin American studies, tutor in the College of Social Studies, recently had a book chapter and an article published.

The chapter, titled, “Social Policies in Latin America: Causes, Characteristics, and Consequences,” appeared in Routledge Handbook of Latin American Politics, edited by Peter Kingstone and Deborah J. Yashar and published March 8 by Routledge. The chapter classifies the main social policies enacted in Latin America from 1920 through 2010, explores the effects of those policies on the well-being of the poor, and outlines some of the forces and circumstances that led to the policies. Its main findings are that social assistance and public provision of many basic social services improved in Latin America after about 1990, even as the coverage of social insurance programs fell; that democracy and authoritarianism played an important and multifaceted role in shaping and constraining social policymaking in the region; and that a full explanation for why Latin American social policies evolved in the way that they did requires taking into account a wider range of factors than are usually invoked to explain the origins and evolution of welfare states in advanced industrial countries.

In March, McGuire also had an article, titled, “Political Regime and Social Performance,” published in Contemporary Politics. In this article, McGuire examines the association between political regime form and social performance, as measured by the infant mortality rate, using time-series cross-sectional regression analysis of 155 to 180 countries observed annually from 1972 to 2007. Controlling for other factors likely to affect infant mortality, democracies are found to have lower infant mortality rates than authoritarian regimes, and long-term democratic experience is found to matter more than short-term democratic practice. Among authoritarian regime types, one-party regimes have lower infant mortality rates than military or limited multiparty regimes, which have lower infant mortality than monarchies.

McGuire Speaks at Conference Honoring Political Scientist Guillermo O’Donnell

James McGuire

James McGuire, chair and professor of government, professor of Latin American studies, spoke on “Class Structure, Distributive Conflict and Democracy: Brazil and Argentina in Comparative Perspective,” during a conference on Guillermo O’Donnell and the Study of Democracy on March 26. The conference took place in in O’Donnell’s hometown of Buenos Aires.

The conference was held in celebration of immense legacy of the eminent political scientist Guillermo O’Donnell (1936–2011), one of the pioneers of democratization studies.

More information is online here.

McGuire Book Wins International Prize

Book by James McGuire

James McGuire’s recent book Wealth, Health, and Democracy in East Asia and Latin America (Cambridge University Press, 2010) was named a Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2010 and won the 2011 Stein Rokkan Prize for Comparative Social Science Research. McGuire is professor and chair in the Department of Government and a member of the Latin American Studies Program at Wesleyan.

The Stein Rokkan Prize is awarded annually by the International Social Science Council (ISSC), the European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR), and the University of Bergen (Norway), in memory of Professor Stein Rokkan, who was an eminent social scientist at the University of Bergen. The ISSC was founded by UNESCO in 1952 and is “the primary international body representing the social and behavioral sciences at a global level.” The ECPR, which manages the Stein Rokkan Prize for the ISSC, awards the prize to a book “that is deemed a very substantial and original contribution to comparative social science research.”

James McGuire

McGuire will receive the prize at the annual meeting of the ISSC Executive Council in Durban, South Africa, on Nov. 26, at which time he will deliver a public lecture on the book.

More information about the 2011 Stein Rokkan Prize is online here.

The Stein Rokkan Prize citation for Wealth, Health, and Democracy in East Asia and Latin America is online here.

 

McGuire Published in Latin American Living Standards, Human Development Report

James McGuire, professor of government, is the author of “Mortality Decline in Chile, 1960-1995,” published in Living Standards in Latin American History: Height, Welfare, and Development, 1750-2000, Cambridge, Mass: David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, Harvard University, 2010; and “Political Factors and Health Outcomes: Insight from Argentina’s Provinces,” published in the United Nations Development Programme, Human Development Report 2010, September 2010.

McGuire Lectures on Politics, Wealth, Democracy in Latin America

James McGuire, professor of government, delivered four invited lectures in 2010. These include:

“Politics, Policy, and Mortality Decline in Chile: The Pinochet Paradox” on April 17 at Carleton College, Foro Latinoamericano;

“Wealth, Health, and Democracy in East Asia and Latin America” on Nov. 3 at Brown University, Center for Latin American Studies;

“Social Policies in Latin America: Characteristics and Consequences” on Nov. 11 at the University of California,

McGuire Authors Book on Wealth, Democracy in East Asia, Latin America

Book by James McGuire

James McGuire, professor of government, professor of Latin American studies, is the author of Wealth, Health, and Democracy in East Asia and Latin America published by Cambridge University Press, 2010.

Wealth, Health, and Democracy in East Asia and Latin America finds that the public provision of basic health care and other inexpensive social services has reduced mortality rapidly even in tough economic circumstances, and that political democracy has contributed to the provision and utilization of such social services, in a wider range of ways than is sometimes recognized. These conclusions are based on case studies of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Indonesia, South Korea, Taiwan and Thailand, as well as on cross-national comparisons involving these cases and others.

At Wesleyan, McGuire specializes in comparative politics with a regional focus on Latin America and East Asia and a topical focus on democracy and public health. He is the author of Peronism without Perón: Unions, Parties, and Democracy in Argentina and is a recipient of Wesleyan’s Binswanger Prize for Excellence in Teaching.

McGuire Author of Wealth, Health, and Democracy

James McGuire, professor of government, professor of Latin American studies, is the author of the book, Wealth, Health, and Democracy in East Asia and Latin America, published by Cambridge University Press, 2010.

Why do some societies fare well, and others poorly, at reducing the risk of early death? Wealth, Health, and Democracy in East Asia and Latin America examines this question and finds that the public provision of basic health care and other inexpensive social services has reduced mortality rapidly even in tough economic circumstances, and that political democracy has contributed to the provision and utilization of such social services, in a wider range of ways than is sometimes recognized. These conclusions are based on case studies of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Indonesia, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand, as well as on cross-national comparisons involving these cases and others.

McGuire specializes in comparative politics with a regional focus on Latin America and East Asia and a topical focus on democracy and public health. He is the author of Peronism without Perón: Unions, Parties, and Democracy in Argentina and is a recipient of Wesleyan’s Binswanger Prize for Excellence in Teaching.