Tag Archive for lectures

Former White House Aide Gary Sick Speaks on “America and Iran”

Gary Sick, senior research scholar at Columbia University, spoke to students April 15 in the Kerr Lecture Hall. Sick served on the National Security Council staff under Presidents Ford, Carter and Reagan. He was the principal White House aide for Iran during the Iranian Revolution and the hostage crisis and is the author of two books on U.S.-Iran relations, in addition to several other edited books and articles dealing with U.S. Middle East policy. Mr. Sick is a captain (ret.) in the U.S. Navy, with service in the Persian Gulf, North Africa and the Mediterranean.

Sturm Lecture with SETI Institute’s Jill Tarter April 13

Aliens abound on the movie screens, but in reality we are still trying to find out if we share our universe with other sentient creatures.

Jill Tarter, director of the Center for SETI Research, is the 2010 Sturm Memorial Lecturer.

Jill Tarter, director of the Center for SETI Research, is the 2010 Sturm Memorial Lecturer.

SETI, the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, is our attempt to detect evidence of a distant technology, in pursuit of cosmic company.

On April 13, astronomer Jill Tarter will speak on “Are We Alone?” as the 2010 Sturm Memorial Lecturer. Tarter is director of the SETI Institute’s Center for SETI Research.

In 2004 Time Magazine named her one of the 100 most influential people in the world, and in 2006 Tarter became a National Advisory Board member for the Center for Inquiry’s Office of Public Policy in Washington, DC. Tarter was one of three Technology, Entertainment, Design (TED) Prize winners in 2009. Many people are now familiar with her work as portrayed by Jodie Foster in the movie Contact.

The event will be held 8 to 10 p.m. in Usdan 300. It is free and open to the public.

The Sturm Memorial Lecture is named in memory of Wesleyan alumnus Kenneth E. Sturm. The annual lecture features a presentation from an astronomer that is outstanding in their field and able to communicate the excitement of science to a lay audience.

For more information contact Seth Redfield, assistant professor of astronomy, at sredfield@wesleyan.edu.

‘War’ Topic of Ongoing Humanities’ Lecture Series

Sally Bachner, assistant professor of English, spoke on “Rape Trauma, Combat Trauma, and the Making of PTSD: Feminist Fiction in the 1970s” Feb. 15 in the Russell House. Bachner's talk was part of the ongoing Center for the Humanities Spring Lecture Series on "War." (Photo by Stefan Weinberger '10)

Sally Bachner, assistant professor of English, spoke on “Rape Trauma, Combat Trauma, and the Making of PTSD: Feminist Fiction in the 1970s” Feb. 15 in the Russell House. Bachner's talk was part of the ongoing Center for the Humanities Spring Lecture Series on "War." (Photo by Stefan Weinberger '10)

In the 1970s, veterans, activists and psychiatrists were hard at work getting the disorder that came to be called post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) included in the upcoming edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders III. During the same period, feminists were building a successful anti-rape movement that crucially insisted that rape is a form of violence.

On Feb. 15, Sally Bachner, assistant professor of English, spoke on “Rape Trauma, Combat Trauma, and the Making of PTSD: Feminist Fiction in the 1970s” during the Center for the John E. Sawyer Spring Lecture Series on War.

The public is invited to all CHUM lectures. (Photo by Stefan Weinberger '10)

The public is invited to all CHUM lectures. (Photo by Stefan Weinberger '10)

Bachner proposed that while both of these groups sought to bring suffering – of combat veterans and rape victims, respectively – into speech, many feminist novelists of this period instead turn to the figure of the soldier to figure rape as unspeakable. PTSD functions in these texts as a technology for figuring what was initially conceived of as suppressed speech about violence against women as a putatively “unspeakable” trauma.

Bachner, who is currently completing a book on violence in contemporary American fiction titled, The Prestige of Violence: American Fiction, 1962-2002, is among a dozen guests speaking in CHUM’s ongoing lecture series. Past topics this spring include robots and war, the war between international law and politics, U.S. foreign policy with Iraq and Afghanistan and war and the nation. Most recently, Trevor Paglen, artist and

Filmmaker Speaks to Wesleyan About Water Crisis

Eco-activist. filmmaker and reality television star Shalini Kantayya spoke about the global water crisis during Wesleyan’s Earth Day Celebration April 15. Her production company, 7th Empire Media, is committed to using media to give a powerful voice to the unheard.

Kantayya captured the attention of the nation during the television series “On the Lot,” a reality show created by Steven Spielberg for the purpose of finding Hollywood’s next great director. Out of over 12,000 filmmakers, Kantayya was the only woman to finish in the top 10.

(Photos by Alexandra Portis ’09)

Pulitzer Prize Winning Junot Diaz Speaks at Wesleyan

Junot Diaz, the English Department's 2009 Millett Writing Fellow, spoke to the Wesleyan community April 1 in Memorial Chapel. Diaz is the author of Drown, a collection of short stories, and the novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, which won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize, the John Sargent Sr. First Novel Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize.

Junot Diaz, the English Department's 2009 Millett Writing Fellow, spoke to the Wesleyan community April 1 in Memorial Chapel. Diaz is the author of Drown, a collection of short stories, and the novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, which won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize, the John Sargent Sr. First Novel Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize.

Pulitzer Prize Writer Edward Jones Reads Work April 17

Edward P. Jones

Edward P. Jones

Pulitzer Prize winning writer Edward P. Jones will offer a reading and commentary April 17 as the 2009 Annie Sonnenblick guest lecturer. The annual lecture series brings distinguished writers to campus to discuss their work and participate in discussion with members of the Wesleyan community.

Widely regarded as one of the nation’s most distinguished contemporary fiction writers, Jones also is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award, the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, and the Lannan Literary Award for his novel, The Known World, an epic story examining the complexities of slavery. The novel won the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for fiction.

Edward P. Jones was educated at Holy Cross College and the University of Virginia. His first book, Lost in the City, was originally published in 1992 by William Morrow and short-listed for the National Book Award. A collection of 14 short stories, Lost in the City deals with African American working class and underclass experiences in mid-20th century, inner-city Washington, D.C. In 2004, he received a MacArthur Fellowship.

Jones was the previous keynote speaker at the 51st annual Wesleyan Writers Conference in 2007. He received a Doctor of Humane Letters from Wesleyan in 2005.

The 2009 Annie Sonnenblick lecture was established by Linda Bland Sonnenblick and her husband, Dr. Edmund H. Sonnenblick ’54 and named in memory of their daughter Annie Sonnenblick, a 1980 graduate of Wesleyan. Annie was a sensitive writer whose interests ranged widely in the fields of language, literature, history and architecture. In addition to the lecture, her family has established the Annie Sonnenblick Writing Award in her honor.

Jones will speak at 8 p.m. in the Center for the Arts’ Cinema. The event is open to the public and is free of charge. The talk is also part of Wesleyan’s Distinguished Writers Series.

For more information contact Lucia Pier, Russell House Arts Fellow, at russellhouse@wesleyan.edu or 860-685-3448., or visit http://www.wesleyan.edu/writing/distinguished_writers.

Author, Researcher Speaks on Government Secrets

State Secrecy and the Limits of the Visible," Dec. 4 at the Eclectic Society. Paglen studies secret government programs from both a political and aesthetic perspective. His talk focused on the secret or "black world" of the military, which is composed of programs, people and places that are officially unacknowledged.

Trevor Paglen from the University of California Berkeley's Department of Geography, spoke on "Blank Spots on a Map: State Secrecy and the Limits of the Visible," Dec. 4 at the Eclectic Society. Paglen studies secret government programs from both a political and aesthetic perspective. His talk focused on the secret or "black world" of the military, which is composed of programs, people and places that are officially unacknowledged.