Tag Archive for musician

Joseph Getter: Educator, Instrumentalist, Ph.D Candidate in Ethnomusicology

Joseph Getter, a Ph.D candidate in ethnomusicology, performs on a frame drum during the Art Farm Sonnet Slam in Middletown. Getter is the music director of Art Farm's summer Shakespeare production. He studies classical South Indian flute and Javanese gamelan at Wesleyan. (Photo by Jody Cormack Ph.D. '92, library assistant in World Music Archives).

Q: Joseph, you are a Ph.D candidate in ethnomusicology. How many years have you been at Wesleyan and when will you finish your Ph.D?

A: I began my graduate studies in ethnomusicology at Wesleyan in the M.A. program in 1995, and don’t you know you’re not supposed to ask when the dissertation will be done? I’m anticipating finishing this summer.

Q: What are you studying, specifically?

A: I have done fieldwork in Chennai, India, on the film music industry there. It’s a huge musical, social, and economic phenomenon that is under-studied in academia. I hope that my dissertation will be a contribution to understanding popular music in South Asia. I’ve also studied classical South Indian flute and Javanese gamelan at Wesleyan.

Q: What are your thoughts on Wesleyan’s ethnomusicology program?

A:  It’s a fantastic program that integrates the study of scholarly literature with learning to perform music traditions from around the world. In seminars with Mark Slobin and Su Zheng, I learned about how to conduct research, and think, write and speak about

Wesleyan Steel Bands ‘Pan the Night Away’

Brandi Cahill, assistant director of the Office of University Events, performs on steel drums during the "Pannin' the Night Away: Steel Band Live" concert Dec. 13 in Usdan University Center. The Wesleyan staff steel band opened.

Brandi Cahill, assistant director of the Office of University Events, performs on steel drums during the "Pannin' the Night Away: Steel Band Live" fall semester concert. The Wesleyan staff band opened with "Under the Sea."

Cheryl-Ann Hagner, director of the Office of University Events and Scheduling, performs on a steel drum with the staff band.

Cheryl-Ann Hagner, director of the Office of University Events and Scheduling, performs on a steel drum with the staff band. Other staff performers included Lisa Calhoun, Camille Dolansky, Susanne Javorski, Mariah Reisner, Beth Labriola, Brian Nangle and Karen Nichols.

Student performers are enrolled in the MUSC course Steel Band, taught by Bill Carbone, private lessons teacher. The course teaches students primarily to perform, but also to discuss and analyze this specific music.

Student performers are enrolled in the MUSC course Steel Band. The course teaches students primarily to perform, but also to discuss and analyze this specific music.

Wesleyan students watch their peers perform on the steel drums.

Wesleyan students watch their peers perform on the steel drums.

The steel pan (or steel drum) is composed of from one to nine 55-gallon steel barrel drums, suspended with stands.

The steel pan (or steel drum) is composed of from one to nine 55-gallon steel barrel drums, suspended with stands. The steel pan is played with wood or aluminum mallets wrapped with rubber which allows the instrument to resonate. (Photos by Olivia Bartlett Drake)

5 questions with … Neely Bruce

Neely Bruce, professor of music.

Neely Bruce, professor of music.

The following is the second installment of The Wesleyan Connection’s new feature, “5 Questions.” This issue, accomplished composer and Wesleyan Professor of Music Neely Bruce is our guest.

Q: I see your piece Vistas will be performed at the “Hearts Pounding and Skins Taut” concert in late October at Wesleyan. For what instrument was this piece originally composed?

NB: Vistas at Dawn is a short (approximately three minute) piece for organ and vibraphone.

Q: For what musician did you compose this piece?

NB: I wrote it for Ronald Ebrecht, Wesleyan University Organist, to play. Over the years I’ve written two major works and several smaller pieces for him. Ron has been a staunch advocate for new music for the organ for years, and has encouraged his faculty colleagues and our students to write all sorts of music in all sorts of styles for that remarkable instrument. This has been going on for more than 20 years, and dozens, perhaps hundreds of new organ works have seen the light of day because Ron asked people to write them and offered an opportunity to get them before the public. Vistas was originally written for a tour that he did in Russia with a Russian percussionist, although he’s played it many times in the US with several different vibes players, including Wesleyan’s own Jay Hoggard. It’s something like a pop ballad—slow, languorous, very chromatic, sometimes almost atonal, sometimes with jazz-like quasi-standard chord changes.

Q: Aside from hearing Vistas at the Center for the Arts in October, where can people see you perform publicly this fall?

NB: October is an exceptionally busy month, even for me. I’m playing the world premiere of Twelve Fugues by Gerald Shapiro, chair of the Music Department at Brown and one of my closest friends. (Shapiro and I were freshmen together at the Eastman School of Music). I’m playing these pieces at Wesleyan’s Crowell Concert Hall on Saturday October 10 at 8 p.m. and at Brown on October 14, with a little Stravinsky and Ravel as the warm-up. The Bill of Rights: Ten Amendments in Eight Motets is being performed at Mitchell College in New London on October 20. For