Tag Archive for East Asian Studies

Sichuan Earthquake Photographs Featured in FEAS Gallery Exhibit

Curator Patrick Dowdey speaks about the exhibit “The Great Sichuan Earthquake” March 30 in the Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies Gallery. On May 12, 2008, a 7.9-magnitude earthquake in Sichuan, China toppled buildings, destroyed roads and left over 80,000 dead. The government responded immediately with a massive rescue effort, and thousands of volunteers from all over China visited the quake zone to help. This is the first U.S. exhibition of these photographs by Chinese photographers, who themselves participated in the relief work.

Touchton Discusses Kashmir’s Ski Industry, India’s Economy

Michael Touchton, assistant professor of government, spoke on “The Politics of Powder: The Ski Industry and the Developmental State in India” March 24 in the Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies. Touchton discussed his experience skiing in Kashmir during the 2010 spring semester and the insights this experience offered on the role of India's state in promoting economic development.

East Asian Studies Majors Teach Local Students through Hands-on Cultural Activities


Erica Chon ’13 teaches a group of students and teachers from the Lorraine Foster Day School how to create a sushi roll during the Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies Outreach Program March 4. The Outreach Program is designed to reach local students by providing a range of hands-on cultural activities that introduce them to various aspects of East Asian cultures. More than 300 students in grades K-12 participate in the program every year.


Imai Published in American Economic Journal

Masami Imai, associate professor of economics, chair and associate professor of East Asian studies, director of the Freeman Center for East Asian Studies, is the co-author of an article titled, “Bank Integration and Transmission of Financial Shocks: Evidence from Japan,” published in the American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, Vol. 3, No. 1, pages 155-183 in January 2011.

This paper investigates whether banking integration plays an important role in transmitting financial shocks across geographical boundaries by using a dataset on the branch network of nationwide city banks and prefecture-level dataset on the formation and collapse of the real estate bubble in Japan.

The results show that the credit and economic cycle of financially integrated prefectures exhibits higher sensitivity to fluctuation in land prices in cities relative to financially isolated ones. These results suggest nationwide banks can be a source of economic volatility when they pass on the impacts of financial shocks to host economies.

Schwarcz Participates in U.S. Speakers Program in China

Vera Schwartz is pictured on the website chinaculture.org.

Vera Schwarcz, the Mansfield Freeman Professor of East Asian Studies, professor of history, was selected by the United States’ Department of State to serve in the Speakers Program Oct. 20-24.

She lectured at several universities in Chongqing and Beijing—on the subject of the 150th anniversary of the destruction of the old summer palace of Yuan Ming Yuan, in 1860.

Having been selected by the State Department as a member of the very first group of American exchange scholars to live and study in China in 1979, Schwarcz has been returning regularly to China for the past three decades. This was the second time she served in an official capacity.

On Oct. 22, she was interviewed by China Daily in a lengthy conversation that took place at the United States in Beijing. This interview was posted on eight news organization websites and has gathered considerable attention in the wake of discussions about globalization of China studies in the 21st century.

Her interview was posted on chinaculture.org, China Daily, ifeng.com, among others.

Givner ’10 to Experience Chinese Culture First Hand

Matthew Givner ’10

On Sept. 1, Matthew Givner ’10 became one of 19 Princeton-in-Asia fellows from around the world who is teaching English in a Chinese province.

Givner moved to Dalain, a city of 6.5 million people located 288 miles east of Beijing.  There, he is teaching English, writing, reading and speaking to students at Dalian University of Technology with three other fellows. He teaches 14 class hours per week.

Givner learned of the program through a family friend and Wesleyan’s Career Resource Center. He attended two information sessions on the program at the Career Resource Center and decided to apply.  

Haddad Joins Elite Group of U.S.-Japan Policymakers for D.C. Meeting

Mary Alice Haddad,assistant professor of government, assistant professor of East Asian studies.

Mary Alice Haddad, assistant professor of government, was named a U.S.-Japan Network Fellow and joined an elite group of 14 other scholars and researchers invited by the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Foundation and the Japan Foundation’s Center for Global Partnership (CGP) to join its June Policymakers meeting in Washington, D.C. this month.

The meeting is part of an ongoing effort by the Mansfield Foundation to “build and enhance a network of new generation Japan specialists that can bring diverse expertise and perspectives to he U.S.-Japan policymaking process.”

The U.S.-Japan Network Fellows also provides an invaluable resource for policymakers in Washington regarding U.S-Japan relations in virtually every arena.

Fellowship Takes Haddad to Japan for Research on Environmental Politics

Mary Alice Haddad, assistant professor of government, assistant professor of East Asian studies, assistant professor of environmental studies, is one of 14 researchers in the world selected for the 2009 Abe Fellowship.

Although Japan lacks large national environmental advocacy organizations, it has one of the best records of environmental policymaking in the world.  Japan is one of the top producers of clean energy technology and hosted the global Kyoto Protocol that has set the standard for climate change policy worldwide.

For the next 12 months, Mary Alice Haddad will use Japan’s experience of environmental activism to build a broader theory of civic participation. She will test and refine a theory through the examination of environmental politics and civic participation in China, Korea, Thailand, Taiwan and Singapore.

Her research is supported by the Abe Fellowship Program. Haddad, assistant professor of government, assistant professor of East Asian studies, assistant professor of environmental studies, is one of 14

East Asian Studies Celebrates Freeman Family Garden with Exhibit

Patrick Dowdey, curator of the Freeman Center for East Asian Studies, adjunct professor of East Asian Studies and anthropology, welcomed guests to the opening of "Shoyoan: Celebrating the Freeman Family Garden" March 31 in the Freeman Gallery. The exhibition features photographs, poetry and video that celebrate time and season in Wesleyan's Freeman Family Garden and Tatami Room.

Patrick Dowdey, curator of the Freeman Center for East Asian Studies, adjunct professor of East Asian Studies and anthropology, welcomed guests to the opening of "Shoyoan: Celebrating the Freeman Family Garden" March 31 in the Freeman Gallery. The exhibition features photographs, poetry and video that celebrate time and season in Wesleyan's Freeman Family Garden and Tatami Room.

Nakamura Speaks on Nativist Movement Scholar

Miri Nakamura, assistant professor of Asian languages and literatures, spoke on "The Supernatural Writings of Ueda Akinari," Feb. 5 in the Freeman Center for Easy Asian Studies. Ueda Akinari (1734-1809) was a writer, poet, a medical doctor, and a scholar of the nativist movement in Edo period Japan.

Miri Nakamura, assistant professor of Asian languages and literatures, spoke on "The Supernatural Writings of Ueda Akinari," Feb. 5 in the Freeman Center for Easy Asian Studies. Ueda Akinari (1734-1809) was a writer, poet, a medical doctor, and a scholar of the nativist movement in Edo period Japan.

Nakamura explained how Akinari’s use of the supernatural is tied to his philosophy on nativism—a proto-nationalist movement that aimed to seek a “Japan” untainted by foreign (mainly Chinese) influences. Akinari's most famous works include Tales of Moonlight and Rain (1776) and Tales of the Spring Rain (1806).

Nakamura explained how Akinari’s use of the supernatural is tied to his philosophy on nativism—a proto-nationalist movement that aimed to seek a “Japan” untainted by foreign (mainly Chinese) influences. Akinari's most famous works include Tales of Moonlight and Rain (1776) and Tales of the Spring Rain (1806).

Vera Schwarcz, the Mansfield Freeman Professor of East Asian Studies, director of the Freeman Center, chair of the East Asian Studies Program and professor of history, listens to Nakamura's talk. (Photos by Stefan Weinberger '10)

Vera Schwarcz, the Mansfield Freeman Professor of East Asian Studies, director of the Freeman Center, chair of the East Asian Studies Program and professor of history, listens to Nakamura's talk. (Photos by Stefan Weinberger '10)

Shirley Lawrence Retires After 34 Years at Wesleyan

From left, Wesleyan President Michael Roth and Vera Schwarcz, the Mansfield Freeman Professor of East Asian Studies, director of the East Asian Studies Program and professor of history, share stories about Shirley Lawrence, third from left, who is retiring as program coordinator of the East Asian Studies Program. Lawrence is pictured with her husband, Ted.

From left, Wesleyan President Michael Roth and Vera Schwarcz, the Mansfield Freeman Professor of East Asian Studies, director of the East Asian Studies Program and professor of history, share stories about Shirley Lawrence, third from left, who is retiring as program coordinator of the East Asian Studies Program. Lawrence is pictured with her husband, Ted.

Shirley Lawrence celebrated her 34 years at Wesleyan with a retirement party Dec. 14 in the Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies. Lawrence began her Wesleyan career in a part-time position the Mathematics Department where she remained until 1977. Lawrence moved to the Center of Humanities where she worked until 1985, and she worked in Alumni Programs until 1987 when the Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies officially opened on Washington Terrace. She is retiring as a program coordinator.

Over the years Lawrence has coordinated such events as tours of the Freeman Family Japanese Garden, lectures on U.S.-Japan security relations, presentations on America’s relations with Vietnam and the traditional drumming and dance of Korean p’ungmulnori by members of the Wesleyan Korean Drumming ensemble.

In addition to handling logistical issues with the speakers and performers, Lawrence wrote press releases, maintained the center’s mailing list, managed the program’s budget, arranged accommodations and oversaw the center’s Outreach Program, which provides hands-on cultural activities for school-aged children.

Lawrence was profiled in The Wesleyan Connection in 2005.

Children Learn About East Asian Culture

The Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies hosted a Children's Program Oct. 4. The event provided an introduction to the exhibition, "Enlightening Images: Buddhist Art Work."

The Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies hosted a Children's Program Oct. 4. The event provided an introduction to the exhibition, "Enlightening Images: Buddhist Art Work."

The center's curator, Patrick Dowdey and curatorial assistants provided hands-on learning activities.

The center's curator, Patrick Dowdey and curatorial assistants provided hands-on learning activities.

The event was part of the Freeman Center's Outreach Program for teaching about East Asia. (Photos by Stefan Weinberger '10)

The event was part of the Freeman Center's Outreach Program for teaching about East Asia. For more information, call 860-685-2330. (Photos by Stefan Weinberger '10)