Monthly Archives: April 2009

Paoletti Honored at Art History in Renaissance Symposium

John Paoletti, the Kenan Professor of the Humanities, professor of art history, will retire from Wesleyan in May.

John Paoletti, the Kenan Professor of the Humanities, professor of art history, will retire from Wesleyan in May.

Dante, Bolognese poetry, Leonardo and Quattrocento were among the topics addressed at the Art and History in Renaissance Italy Symposium May 1-2 on campus.

The event was held in honor of John Paoletti, Kenan Professor of the Humanities, professor of art history, who is retiring in May. Paoletti is an internationally-prominent scholar in art history with much of his work focused on the Italian Renaissance.

“This symposium is a unique one that honors John’s 37 years of service to Wesleyan, and his foundational role in developing the university’s program in Art History,” says Joseph Siry, professor of art history. “The symposium consisted of papers given by scholars in this field, who came to Wesleyan from around the United States, each of whom has had a special professional connection to John’s career.”

Art and Literature was the subject of talks on May 1. Judith Brown, professor of history, was the moderator. Debra Pincus, from the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., spoke on “When Did Dante Get to Look like Dante?”

Daniel Zolli ‘07 discussed “The ‘Hypnerotmachia Poliphili’ (1499) and Aldus Manutius’ Humanist Literary Enterprise.”

Nadja Aksamija, assistant professor of art history, lectured on “Sacralizing the Bolognese Landscape: Architecture, Poetry, and the Counter-Reformation Villa.”

Quattrocento Art and Patronage was the subject of talks on May 2. Clark Maines, Kenan Professor of the Humanities, professor of art history, professor of medieval studies, was the moderator. Presenters and their topics included:

Shelley Zuraw, from the University of Georgia, spoke on “What Brunelleschi Learned in Pistoia: The Competition Panel Again.”

Sharon Strocchia, of Emory University, discussed “Abbess Piera de’ Medici and Artistic Patronage at S. Verdiana, Florence, c. 1450.″

David Drogin, of the Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York, spoke on “Sculpture, Patronage, Emulation and the Bentivoglio of Bologna.”

Cinquecento and Sculpture Art and Literature was the subject of talks for the third session on May 2. Laurie Nussdorfer, professor of history, professor of letters, served as the moderator. Presenters and their topics included:

William Wallace, of Washington University, St. Louis, discussed “On Location…or why go? Reflections on Conducting Research in Italy.”

Gary Radke, of Syracuse University spoke on  “Leonardo, Student of Sculpture.”

Roger Crum, of the University of Dayton, discussed “Pieces, and, Yes, Masterpieces: The Use of Crying over Spilled Marble in Renaissance Florence.”

And Michael Cole, of the University of Pennsylvania, spoke on “Clothed Men in Piazza.”

All three sessions will concluded with questions and discussion. A reception for all symposium participants and attendees was held in the Russell House.

A private dinner at the Inn at Middletown following the symposium honored Paoletti, who came to Wesleyan in 1972, with the idea that he would work to build a program in art history. Gradually, over the course of the next 27 years and under his leadership, the program grew to a faculty of eight full-time appointments, a size larger than many Ph.D programs.

At the dinner, David Drogin ’94, assistant chair of the History of Art Department at the State University of New York, announced that a book is being published in Paoletti’s honor.

Its title is Patronage and Italian Renaissance Sculpture and it is under contract with Ashgate Press, with an expected publication date in 2010. The book is edited by Drogin and Kathleen Christian ’94. Both Drogin and Christian are former students of Paoletti.

“The project had been kept a secret from John, until we announced the book and presented him with a table-of-contents at the symposium dinner,” Drogin says. “It includes chapters by several of the symposium participants, as well as by several other leading Renaissance scholars from around the world.”

During his time at Wesleyan, Paoletti has set standards for teaching and scholarly excellence. While publishing on his first love, the Italian Renaissance, he also produced a series of distinguished exhibitions of 20th century art and accompanying catalogues, making him one of the few scholars active today who publish in two different periods of art history.

“As John’s career at Wesleyan comes to a close, his colleagues will miss the knowledge that he has shared freely, the advice about pedagogy that he has given freely, but most of all his leadership and unfailing goodwill,” Maines says.

Wesleyan’s Fulbright, German Exchange Scholars Announced

Anthropology and Science in Society major Kate Ottaviano ’09 has already immersed herself in several cultures. As a daughter of international educators, she attended school in Italy and Japan, built a concrete house in a Filipino slum, delivered school supplies to impoverished children in Romania, and taught English to imprisoned women in Peru.

Kate Ottaviano '09

Kate Ottaviano '09

Ottaviano will continue her cultural immersion in 2009-10 as a Fulbright scholar, teaching English language in the European country of Macedonia. Administered by the Institute for International Education, the Fulbright U.S. Student Program awards full research grants to graduating seniors and young alumni after an extensive application process. Recipients receive a stipend to cover travel, housing and living expenses.

“Each culture speaks and breathes within me, influencing my personal outlook on the world in a unique way,” Ottaviano says. “The life my parents chose for me has enabled me to feel at home in any country and has taught me tolerance, empathy, and the merits of diversity.”

College of Letters and German studies major Andrew Kirwin ’09 and Russian Literature major Emily Wang ’08 also received a Fulbright Scholarship. Patrick Garrity ’06 is an alternate. College of Letters and German studies major Jason Kavett ’09 was also offered a Fulbright scholarship, but instead accepted a German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) Scholarship for Graduate Study.

“I will always be interested in learning about people and cultures, inside and out, and Wesleyan has helped me better understand my goals in life,” Ottaviano says, who received a specialized English Teaching Assistantship program award. “Teaching is one of them, and the Fulbright Program will give me the chance to further explore this passion.”

Andrew Kirwin '09

Andrew Kirwin '09

Kirwin will use his Fulbright for German literature research. He’s planning to study at the Freie Universität in Berlin, where he will research the concept of madness in literary and theoretical works from the era of German Romanticism.

He credits the interdisciplinary nature of Wesleyan’s College of Letters for introducing him to close readings of European literary and philosophical texts within their historical context.

“I will investigate a shift in German perceptions of mental illness as reflected in these works, from dread and mistreatment of the insane to fascination with and sympathy for them,” Kirwin says. “My research will trace this reversal in thought about insanity, its manifestation in Romantic literature, and the part it plays in Romantic aesthetics.”

To understand the new medical theories of madness that were developing at this time, Kirwin will study the works of the physician Johann Christian Reil, who coined the term “psychiatry” in 1808, and revolutionized perceptions of insanity.

“Through this project I will gain valuable research experience in the field which will better prepare me for graduate-level work,” he says.

Emily Wang '06

Emily Wang '08

Wang will use her Fulbright award to expand on her senior thesis at Wesleyan. She will examine the least-studied writings of Russian modernist poet Nikolai Gumilev (1886-1921). His narrative poems “Mik” (1918) and the verse collection Tent (1921) reconsider the African themes present in Gumilev’s earlier, more autobiographical poetry.

“Gumilev began as writer known for his devotion to the Symbolist movement, masculine persona, and travels to Africa, but as his writing developed he became not only a great and original poet, but also a highly influential editor, mentor and critic,” Wang says. “Scholars are now studying neglected writers like Gumilev with great interest, and Russian high schools have begun including his poetry in the curricula. I am eager to join the Russian students, scholars and writers who are now beginning to acknowledge Gumilev’s contributions to their heritage.”

She plans to conduct this research in Moscow and take supplementary courses at Moscow State University.

Jason Kavett '09

Jason Kavett '09 (submitted photo)

Like the Fulbright recipients, Kavett will have opportunity to complete a year-long research project. He will work at the at the University of Konstanz and study German poet Durs Grünbein’s lyric poetry as a point of intersection between science, philosophy, and literature.

Grünbein, a Berlin-based author, is the recipient of Germany’s highest literary prizes, including the Georg-Büchner-Preis and the Peter Huchel Prize for Poetry.

“Durs Grünbein is considered one of the most important literary voices to have come of age in the former East Germany, and an insightful commentator on the representation of German history,” Kavett explains. “In particular, I am interested in asking what idea of human life Grünbein suggests by including in his lyric poetry anatomical models, and what this perhaps ironic approach to the body illuminates about Grünbein’s poetic reflections on history.”

Natural Sciences and Mathematics Hosts Poster Session

Jan Naegele, chair and professor of biology, professor of neuroscience and behavior, and Wesleyan President Michael Roth listen to Kai Xuan Keith Tan explain his research during the Natural Science and Mathematics Poster Session April 17. Tan's project was titled "The Role of Ku70 in Regulating Cell Death during Cerebral Cortical Development."

Janice Naegele, chair and professor of biology, professor of neuroscience and behavior, and Wesleyan President Michael S. Roth listen to Kai Xuan Keith Tan '09 explain his research during the Natural Science and Mathematics Poster Session April 17. Tan's project was titled "The Role of Ku70 in Regulating Cell Death during Cerebral Cortical Development."

Preschoolers' Use of Testimony."

Psychology graduate student Keera Bhandari explains her research on "Acquiring Knowledge from Others: Preschoolers' Use of Testimony."

Shuk Kei Cheng '09 talks to David Bodznick, dean of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, professor of biology, professor of neuroscience and behavior, about her project titled "Anodic Oxidative Functionalization of Tolune Derivatives."

Shuk Kei Cheng '09 talks to David Bodznick, dean of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, professor of biology, professor of neuroscience and behavior, about her project titled "Anodic Oxidative Functionalization of Tolune Derivatives."

Finding Intermediate Mass Black Holes in the Local Universe," with Laurel Appel, director of the Wesleyan McNair Program, adjunct associate professor of biology, senior research associate.

Hannah Sugarman '09 discusses her research on "Baby Giants: Finding Intermediate Mass Black Holes in the Local Universe," with Laurel Appel, director of the Wesleyan McNair Program, adjunct associate professor of biology, senior research associate.

Physics major Anand Swaminathan '09 explains his research on "Vortex Dissipation in Superfluid Third Sound Flows."

Physics major Anand Swaminathan '09 explains his research on "Vortex Dissipation in Superfluid Third Sound Flows."

Molecular biology and biochemistry major Muna Nahar '09 researched gene regulation.

Molecular biology and biochemistry major Muna Nahar '09 talks about her research on gene regulation.

What is the Releationship?"

Psychology major Sarah Jeffrey '09 presented her findings on "Elementary Neurocognition, Learning Potential, and Function Life Skills: What is the Relationship?" (Photos by Olivia Bartlett)

Admitted Students Sample Wesleyan Life During WesFest

President Michael Roth performs with the band, Mad Wow Disease, during WesFest 2009 on Andrus Field.

More than 500 students and their families celebrated all-things Wesleyan during the annual WesFest April 16-18 on campus.

WesFest allows all admitted students an opportunity to explore what Wesleyan has to offer. Attendees took campus tours, visited campus housing, attended classes, explored science laboratories, samples campus dining, visited with current Wesleyan students, viewed art, film and music performances, and much more.

“WesFest benefits students by giving them the opportunity to engage with the Wesleyan community,” says Stephanie Pruitt, program and events coordinator for the Office of Admission. “For many students, their time on campus helps them decide if Wesleyan will be their home for the next four years.”

Wesleyan received 10,065 applications for entry to its Class of 2013, up 22 percent over last year’s admission cycle. Approximately 22 percent of this year’s applicants have been admitted to Wesleyan, including some 350 students who were admitted during the early decision period. The class of 2013 is expected to comprise approximately 745 students.

A March 29 article in The New York Times discussed how applications for the Class of 2013 remained strong at the nation’s most competitive colleges, despite the economy’s recent economic recession. Mentioned in the article was Wesleyan which, unlike several liberal arts colleges, saw an increase in applications this year. The Times had previously written about Wesleyan’s increase in applications during the November early decision application period, which was also up a record 40 percent over the previous year.

President Michael Roth also wrote a piece for The Huffington Post on the economy’s impact on the Class of 2013 both nationally and at Wesleyan.

Greg Pyke, senior associate dean of admission, said 511 admitted students registered for WesFest 2009, although several students attended without registering.

“Many WesFest events are planned by current students, faculty, and staff, and therefore it becomes a great representation of the types of things that happen in the Wesleyan community every day,” Pruitt says.

Pictured below are images taken during the three-day festival (Photos by Olivia Bartlett and Alexandra Portis ’09).

Mishara-Blomberger ’11, West ’11 Receive Goldwater Scholarships

From the day Carl T. West ’11 arrived on Wesleyan’s campus, he wanted to study the fundamentals of quantum mechanics.

Although reluctant at first, Tsampikos Kottos, assistant professor of physics, welcomed the eager frosh to his “Complex Quantum Dynamics and Mesoscopic Phenomena” research group.

“To be honest, Carl was a kind of an experiment, for me,” Kottos says. “I usually take sophomores and above at my group, but Carl was so confident on what he wanted, so I decided to involve a freshman in our research. It was a good and decision.”

Carl T. West '11

Carl T. West '11

In the past two years, West wrote an article that was accepted to an international physics journal, presented research to the American Physical Society, and worked out a system dealing with quantum chaos studies with results Kottos had not seen before. And in April, West, along with Jonas Mishara-Blomberger ’11, received a Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship for the 2009-10 academic year.

The Goldwater Scholarship Award, established by Congress in 1986, is the most prestigious national undergraduate scholarship in mathematics, physics and engineering. Of the 1,097 applicants nominated by faculty members, only 278 students were selected to receive the scholarship.

West, a mathematics, physics and philosophy triple major, and Mishara-Blomberger, a mathematics and physics double major, will each receive a $7,500 scholarship to help cover the cost of tuition, fees, books, and room and board for their junior and senior year. They will join Kottos at the Max-Planck Institute in Göttingen, Germany this summer.

“It is very exciting for me to receive the Goldwater Fellowship because it is both a great honor and also gives me encouragement to continue pursuing my goals to do research in physics and mathematics,” Mishara-Blomberger says.

Jonas Mishara-Blomberger '11

Jonas Mishara-Blomberger '11

Mishara-Blomberger applied for the Goldwater scholarship while working with Assistant Professor of Physics Greg Voth’s research group on dynamic phenomena of granular gasses. By vibrating a glass chamber filled with 3mm-wide glass spheres, the Voth lab achieved a system of macroscopic particles that have similar properties to a gas.

“Whereas in a gas, you usually cannot acquire data of individual molecules, in our quasi-2-dimensional granular gas we can measure the trajectories of every particle. This direct measurement allows us to calculate variables like pressure, stresses, and viscosity of our system at any given height and time,” Mishara-Blomberger explains.

He will join Kottos’ group this summer to study current relaxation for systems with phase transition (for example how light intensity decays out of a leaking cavity filled with random scatterers).

“It is one of the research lines very close to the same family of problems that Carl and former students have worked on in the past,” Kottos explains. “I am optimistic that Jonas will also come up with a new strong result.”

West will begin a new project, studying how an initial excitation, evolves in time for two systems which are very similar to one-another. This study aims to quantify the sensitivity of dynamics of a complex mesoscopic system to small perturbations. These perturbations are associated with fabrication errors of the mesoscopic device, changes in the environmental temperature etc.

“Here the systems are too big to describe using exact Quantum mechanics, but too small for Newtonian mechanics to work well either. So, these systems allows us to probe fundamental types of questions regarding the agreement of classical and quantum descriptions of chaos,” West explains. “In fact, we are even able to examine the dynamics, that is, how the system changes in time, which is an exceptionally difficult problem.”

In 2008, Goldwater Scholarships went to Noah Biro ’09 a molecular biology and biochemistry and sociology double major, and Alison Ringel ’09, a molecular biology and biochemistry and physics double major.

“This continues the great 2008 success of our Wesleyan undergraduates in the annual competition,” says Reinhold Blumel, the Charlotte Augusta Ayers Professor of Physics, chair of the Physics Department. “Both Jonas and Carl are doing great work in physics, and this, no doubt, attests to Wesleyan’s strength in the sciences and mathematics.”

After Wesleyan, West hopes to pursue a Ph.D in physics and become a research professor; whereas Mishara-Blomberger is planning to attend graduate school for either mathematics or theoretical physics.

“I feel very strongly that my getting this award reflects the strength of Wesleyan’s Physics Department and the amazing commitment we have to undergraduate research,” West says. “What I have been able to do in the past four semesters is totally impossible at most major universities, but here at Wes it is not only doable but encouraged.”

In addition to sharing the Goldwater Scholarship, Mishara-Blomberger and West also received the Johnston Prize in 2008. The prize is awarded to those first-year students or sophomores whose performance in their first two semesters of physics shows exceptional promise.

In April 2009, they  each received the Karl Van Dyke Prize, awarded each year to one or more students either majoring in physical science or having a predominant interest in physical science and technology, and who show outstanding achievement in academic work and a promise of productivity in a professional career. They were nominated by faculty in the Physics Department.

Students Explore Nursing Profession Through Documentary Film Course

Jacob Bricca, adjunct assistant professor of film studies, works with Laurenellen McCann '09 on a nursing profession film April 23. Bricca is co-teaching the spring semester course "Making the Science Documentary."

Jacob Bricca, adjunct assistant professor of film studies, works with Laurenellen McCann '09 on a nursing profession film April 23. Bricca is co-teaching the spring semester course "Making the Science Documentary." McCann's film is focused on an oncology nurse.

Baltimore native Esther McCready grew up in segregated, discriminatory world and was denied admission to the University of Maryland School of Nursing. At that time, the school did not admit “Negros.”

With help from NAACP civil rights leaders like Thurgood Marshall, she sued for admission to the university, and in April 1950, McCready won her right to attend classes.

In the spring semester course “Making the Science Documentary,” molecular biology and biochemistry major Christopher Doucette ’11 had the opportunity to interview and film McCready about being the first African American woman to attend Maryland’s School of Nursing. He also interviewed Rosetta Sands, the first African American dean in the University of Maryland’s undergraduate program.

“I asked these women about their stories and really analyzed how racial relations affected their school and working experience as nurses before, during and after the Civil Rights movement,” Doucette says. “I have always been interested in how science has been represented through both still and moving images, and this class really taught me how documentaries can be effective tools in conveying information and educating the public about pressing social and scientific issues.”

Doucette and his classmates Sarah Gillig ’09 and Vytaute Pivoriunaite ’12 traveled to the University of Maryland School of Nursing Living History Museum, where they conducted research on the history of nursing. Each student made his or her own film for the class, which was co-taught by Manju Hingorani, associate professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, and Jacob Bricca, adjunct assistant professor of film studies.

The science and film hybrid class, designated a Service Learning Course, is designed to introduce students to topics in the life sciences and the basics of documentary filmmaking, in order to teach students the skills and art of communicating science-related issues through visual media.

Students learn technical filmmaking skills such as composition, lighting and editing, and study science documentaries to understand functional models of non-fiction filmmaking. In complementary sessions, students learned about specific diseases, at the molecular, cellular, and human level, to develop a knowledge base that enables intellectual engagement with the nursing profession.

“I wanted students to gain an appreciation of the biological sciences at the molecular and organism level, learn about diseases like cancer and diabetes that have a devastating impact on so many people, and learn about biomedical research as it relates to the nursing profession,” Hingorani explains.

The 12 enrolled students worked under the guidance of Ann Anthony, a retired home care registered nurse and educator. Anthony made arrangements for the students to meet nurses working in hospice, oncology and palliative care at Middlesex Hospital; nurses working at the Joslin Diabetes Center in New London, Conn.; and a certified nurse specializing in wound care at Middlesex Hospital. Anthony also lectured on the history of the nursing profession, explaining how the nursing profession has evolved in the past 50 years.

“I was very impressed with the integrity and open-mindedness of all the Wesleyan students, and how serious they were in their projects,” Anthony says. “It was fascinating to see how these students with no medical or nursing background approached their films with a liberal arts perspective.”

Chris Skorik '09 edits his film on male nurses.

Chris Skorik '09 edits his film on male nurses.

Classmates Chris Skorik ’09, Kaitlin Halibozek ’10 and Elliott Skopin ’11 explored the role of gender in the field of nursing for their films. They interviewed two male nurses, one at Lawrence and Memorial Hospital in New London, and one from Middlesex Hospital, about their experiences in the profession.

“Nursing is currently dominated by about 90 percent females due to historical and cultural associations between the role females in society and nursing,” Skorik says. “As we had expected, they faced social barriers to their acceptance as nurses, especially early on in their careers. Confusion and occasional opposition was common from family members, for example ‘why aren’t you becoming a doctor instead?’ and from patients ‘wait, so you’re not my doctor?’”

All three students shot footage and interviews, and created three separate cuts based on their own preferences. From seven hours of raw footage, they created three, eight-minute documentaries highlighting different aspects of this interesting phenomenon.

This is the second iteration of “Making the Science Documentary” taught by Hingorani and Bricca. The first class, taught in Spring 2007, focused on four research labs at Wesleyan. The course is part of the interdisciplinary Science and Film Courses initiative begun in 2005 with support from Wesleyan’s Fund for Innovation, the National Science Foundation and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Doucette’s film on African American nurses and Halibozek’s film on male nursing will be shown at the 2009 Nightingale Awards for Excellence in Nursing, Connecticut’s largest state-wide nursing recognition program on April 30. Doucette’s film will be shown at a gala in Hartford, and Halibozek’s film will be shown at a gala in New London.

Price Speaks on Black Nationalism at the University of Nevada

Melanye Price. (Photo by Chion Wolf)

Melanye Price. (Photo by Chion Wolf)

Melanye Price, assistant professor of government, was a featured guest speaker for the University of Nevada’s College of Liberal Arts on April 23. She was broadcast on 88.9 KNPR Nevada Public Radio.

In a lecture titled “Dreaming Blackness: Black Nationalism and African-American Public Opinion,” Price spoke about ways African-Americans have come to understand Black Nationalism, an ideology important to the Black Power movement of the 1960s.

Oracle Acquires Sun, Headed by Jonathan Schwartz ’87

Jonathan Schwartz '87 (Photo by Bill Burkhart)

Jonathan Schwartz '87 (Photo by Bill Burkhart)

On April 20, Oracle Corp. announced it would acquire Sun Microsystems, whose chief executive officer is Jonathan Schwartz ’87. The deal, valued at $7.4 billion, promises to make Oracle a more potent competitor against I.B.M., Sun’s previous suitor, according to The New York Times.

“With Sun, Oracle will more directly compete against I.B.M., H.P. and other giants selling products and services used in corporate data centers by big corporations,””said the Times. “The move by Oracle is part of the trend of the largest technology companies to assemble more offerings — hardware, software and services — for corporate customers, often through acquisitions, as I.B.M., H.P., Cisco and Oracle have all done in recent years.”

In an e-mail to Sun employees, reported by the Wall Street Journal, Schwartz spoke about the acquisition:

“This is one of the toughest emails I’ve ever had to write. It’s also one of the most hopeful about Sun’s future in the industry. To me, this proposed acquisition totally redefines the industry, resetting the competitive landscape by creating a company with great reach, expertise and innovation. A combined Oracle/Sun will be capable of cultivating one of the world’s most vibrant and far reaching developer communities, accelerating the convergence of storage, networking and computing, and delivering one of the world’s most powerful and complete portfolios of business and technical software.”

Population Growth Topic of Stewart’s Earth Week Rant

Brian Stewart, associate professor of physics, led the second annual Earth Week Rant April 23 in Exley Science Center. The event was open to the entire Wesleyan community.

Brian Stewart, associate professor of physics, led this second annual "Earth Week Rant" April 23 in Exley Science Center. The event was open to the Wesleyan and broader communities.

Stewart focused his rant on the connection between resource depletion, pollution including global warming, and population growth. HHere, Stewart explains the Canadian and U.S. natural gas resources and reserves.

Stewart focused his "rant" on the connection between resource depletion, pollution including global warming, and population growth. Here, Stewart discusses the Canadian and U.S. natural gas resources and reserves.

Stewart hopes his rants lead the Wesleyan community into building a sustainable future. (Photos by Olivia Bartlett)

Stewart decided to establish his annual tradition in recognition of the urgent need for discussion of these critical issues. He regards the nearly full house of attendees from the Wesleyan and broader communities as evidence of the popular appetite for information on resource, pollution and population issues.(Photos by Olivia Bartlett)

West ’11, Kottos Co-Author Article on Dynamical Systems

Carl T. West ’11 and Tsampikos Kottos, assistant professor of physics, are co-authors of the article “Short-time Loschmidt gap in dynamical systems with critical chaos,” which was accepted for publication in Physical Review E Rapid Communications.

Press Printer, Book Artist Speaks With Art Classes

Amos Paul Kennedy, Jr. spoke about his career as a press printer and book artist April 21 in the Center for the Arts Cinema.

Amos Paul Kennedy, Jr. spoke about his career as a press printer and book artist April 21 in the Center for the Arts Cinema.

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Kennedy spoke to students in Professor of Art David Schorr’s classes. Schorr is pictured at left.
While on campus, Kennedy also had a screening of "Proceed and Be Bold!" a new documentary about Kennedy that includes interviews with Gina Ulysse, associate profesor of anthropology, associate professor of African American studies. His visit was sponsored in part by the Friends of Wesleyan Library. (Photos by Alexandra Portis '09)

While on campus, Kennedy also had a screening of "Proceed and Be Bold!" a new documentary about Kennedy that includes interviews with Gina Ulysse, associate profesor of anthropology, associate professor of African American studies. His visit was sponsored in part by the Friends of Wesleyan Library. (Photos by Alexandra Portis '09)

Child Behavior, Minority Reinforcement at Psychology Poster Session

Sarah Edelman ’09 explains her research to Scott Plous, professor of psychology, during the Department of Psychology Research Poster Presentation April 23 in Judd Hall. Edelman’s study, "The Relative Contributions of Physical Attractiveness and Prosocial Behavior in Preschool Friendship Choices" explores how children ages 3 and 4 chose friends in school and internalize gender schemas early on.

Sarah Edelman ’09 explains her research to Scott Plous, professor of psychology, during the Department of Psychology Research Poster Presentation April 23 in Judd Hall. Edelman’s study, "The Relative Contributions of Physical Attractiveness and Prosocial Behavior in Preschool Friendship Choices" explores how children ages 3 and 4 chose friends in school and internalize gender schemas early on.

Mothering Styles and Object Learning in Germany, Greece and Italy,”  Schug and her collaborators observed 77 mother-infant dyads in play for five minute periods, differentiating between independent or interdependent maternal style.

Post Doc Mariah Schug explains her research to Ruth Striegel-Moore, the Walter A. Crowell University Professor of the Social Sciences, professor and chair of psychology. In "Mother-Infant Interactions in a Cross-Cultural Sample: Mothering Styles and Object Learning in Germany, Greece and Italy,” Schug and her collaborators observed 77 mother-infant dyads in play for five minute periods, differentiating between independent or interdependent maternal style.

The Role of Hyphenation in Three-Word Expressions.” Her study explores how we process meaning from three word phrases like “last-minute shopping,” with and without hyphenation.

At right, Joe Bruno, professor of chemistry and vice president for academic affairs and provost, comments on Kacey Wochna's '10 research titled "Three-Word or Three Word: The Role of Hyphenation in Three-Word Expressions.” Her study explores how we process meaning from three word phrases like “last-minute shopping,” with and without hyphenation.

Arielle Tolman '10, pictured, and Juliana Neuspiel ‘09 researched "Differential Predictors of Everyday Skills and Satisfaction with Life in Patients with Schizophrenia.” The students worked with 49 stabilized outpatients with schizophrenia.

Arielle Tolman '10, pictured, and Juliana Neuspiel ‘09, researched "Differential Predictors of Everyday Skills and Satisfaction with Life in Patients with Schizophrenia.” The students worked with 49 stabilized outpatients who have been diagnosed with schizophrenia.

David Baranger '09 talks about his research titled "Does Learning Potential Predict Rehabilitation Outcome in Schizophrenia" to Barbara Juhasz, assistant professor of psychology.

David Baranger '10 talks about his research titled "Does Learning Potential Predict Rehabilitation Outcome in Schizophrenia" to Barbara Juhasz, assistant professor of psychology.

Similar Physical Appearance/Different Social Perception, Manipulation of Self-efficacy.” His study questions the effectiveness of Wesleyan tutoring programs in which minority students of high socioeconomic status tutor middle-school students with low socioeconomic status.

BA/MA student Jermain Lewis '09 presented his research on "Minority Reinforcement: Similar Physical Appearance/Different Social Perception, Manipulation of Self-efficacy.” His study questions the effectiveness of Wesleyan tutoring programs in which minority students of high socioeconomic status tutor middle-school students with low socioeconomic status.

Preschoolers’ Use of Testimony” which explores how preschool-age children learn to trust or distrust what others tell them. (Photos by Olivia Bartlett)

Graduate student Keera Bhandari, talks to John Seamon, professor of psychology, professor of neuroscience and behavior, about her study “Acquiring Knowledge from Others: Preschoolers’ Use of Testimony” which explores how preschool-age children learn to trust or distrust what others tell them. (Photos by Olivia Bartlett)