Monthly Archives: February 2010

Olympic Silver for McKenna, US Women’s Hockey

Wesleyan Women’s Ice Hockey Coach Jodi McKenna, the assistant coach of the U.S Women’s Hockey team, received a silver medal along with her team after a 2-0 loss in the championship game vs. Canada. McKenna was also profiled here.

Trammell ’10: Russia Polluting Lake Baikal

In an opinion piece for Business Week, Elizabeth Trammell ’10, laments the recent decision by the Russian Government to allow a the resumption of operations at a paper mill on the banks of Lake Baikal, the deepest, and one of the largest fresh water lakes in the word. Permission for the mill to operate is a reversal of a policy enacted just four years ago aimed at stemming pollution in the lake and a serious setback for environmentalists. Prime Minister Vladimir Putin signed the order allowing the resumption of activities at the mill. Trammell’s piece originally appeared in TOL Online.

Pomper on His New Book: ‘Lenin’s Brother’

Philip Pomper, William Armstrong Professor of History, is interviewed by The History News Network regarding his new book, Lenin’s Brother. Pomper discusses the process of researching and writing the book, as well as the prominence and historical significance of Lenin’s older brother Alexander Ulyanov, also known as ‘Sasha.’

Roth on Gormley’s ‘The Death of American Virtue’

In The San Francisco Chronicle, President Michael S. Roth reviews Ken Gormley’s new book, The Death of American Virtue: Clinton vs. Starr. Roth says that while the book comes in at 789 pages, “it’s a great read that reveals the core dynamics of historical events that influence (and plague) American political life to this day.”

Swinehart on Menand’s “The Marketplace of Ideas”

The Chicago Tribune featured a review by Kirk Swinehart, assistant professor of history, of Louis Menand’s latest book, The Marketplace of Ideas, which examines American universities. Menand, a faculty member at Harvard University as well as a staff writer at The New Yorker, examines the forces that have shaped these institutions, especially in the last few decades. Swinehart writes that “To anyone who has spent time on the inside, as they say, The Marketplace of Ideas is alternately bracing and chilling.” He says that Menand writes with the same “wry elan” that made his last book so good, and that The Marketplace of Ideas is “deeply relevant.”

Rutland: Obama’s ‘Reset’ with Russia Failing

In a recent opinion piece for The Moscow Times, Peter Rutland, professor of government, Colin and Nancy Campbell Professor in Global Issues and Democratic Thought, says that, despite a good start, the much publicized “reset” with Russia enacted by The Obama Administration has ground to a halt. Rutland discusses the reasons for this, including some miscalculations and questions as to what kind of relationship Russia wants to have with the U.S.

McKenna Part of U.S. Olympic Team

Women’s hockey coach Jodi McKenna is part of the U.S. Olympic contingent in Vancouver, Canada, serving as assistant coach for the U.S. Women’s Hockey Team. McKenna was recently profiled in the Wesleyan Connection as well.

Yohe on Costs of Polar Ice Melt, Global Warming

Gary Yohe, Woodhouse/Sysco Professor of Economics and a senior member if the U.N.’s IPCC panel, discusses the economic implications of polar ice melt with ABC’s Bill Blakemore ’65. Some estimates have the costs of polar ice melts and ensuing rising seas at $2.4 trillion over the next few decades. Yohe says that there have been more than 300 studies on the dollar costs of global warming with varying outcomes projected. Yohe points out more than 88% of the studies show negative implications and heightened dollar costs over the long term.

Applications Up By 6 Percent Over Record Year

Wesleyan received 203 more applications from the Midwest, 266 more applications from the South and 619 from the West compared to 2008 data. Applicants from the Northeast increased by 392 since 2008. (Photo by Bill Burkhart)

Wesleyan received 203 more applications from the Midwest, 266 more applications from the South and 619 from the West compared to 2008 data. Applicants from the Northeast increased by 392 since 2008. (Photo by Bill Burkhart)

This year, 10,645 seniors from around the world applied to Wesleyan University, an increase of 6 percent from 2009, which was a record year for applications, despite the sour economy.

“Last year we reached an all-time high for applications, up by 22 percent, and this year is 6 percent over that,” says Greg Pyke, senior associate dean of admission.

Of these students, 41 percent are male and 59 percent are female.

The applicant pool contains 362 candidates for the Freeman Asian Scholars program, 860 for early decision admission and 9,423 applications in the regular review process. Two-hundred-and-twenty-nine of these students are alumni sons and daughters.

Nancy Meislahn, dean of admission and financial aid, is encouraged by the increase in “markets that Wesleyan has identified as high potential and priority for recruitment initiatives.” These include African-American applicants, applicants from the South,

Installation by Sasamoto ’04 at Whitney Biennial

Ski Sasamoto. (Photo by Stefan Ruiz)

Aki Sasamoto. (Photo by Stefan Ruiz/Interview Magazine)

A performance/installation work by Aki Sasamoto ’04, titled “Strange Attractors” will be on view as part of the 2010 Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art (945 Madison Avenue at 75th St., 212-570-3600, www.whitney.org/Exhibitions/2010Biennial) from Feb. 25–May 30 in New York City.

Sasamoto will be performing occasionally as part of the installation (on days of the month that contain the numbers 6, 9, 16, 19, 26 and 29) at 4 p.m., a.k.a. 16 o’clock. She applies mathematical concepts to personal life stories, while somehow making sense of her kaleidoscopic worldview. She says that her work deals with such varied subjects as “donuts, psychics and hemorrhoids.”

After graduating from Wesleyan, Sasamoto danced for a year in New York City with various choreographers, while creating her own works. She received an MFA in visual arts from Columbia University’s School of the Arts in 2007. She has continued to show her works in both visual arts and dance venues, mostly in New York, but also in such locations as Germany, Japan and New Zealand.

Sasamoto is the co-founder and co-director of Culture Push, a nonprofit arts organization with two other Wesleyan graduates Clarinda Mac Low ’87 and Arturo Vidich ’03 (www.culturepush.org). She taught sculpture at Wesleyan in fall 2009.

A video of Sasamoto talking about her upcoming performance at the Whitney Museum is online at http://www.whitney.org/WatchAndListen/Artists/Sasamoto.

Hussein ’11 to Study Public Policy as Junior Summer Fellow

As a Public Policy & International Affairs Junior Summer Institute Fellow, Jourdan Hussein '11 will spend six weeks at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University this summer.

As a Public Policy & International Affairs Junior Summer Institute Fellow, Jourdan Hussein ’11 will spend six weeks at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University this summer.

This summer, Jourdan Khalid Hussein ’11 will be given the skills and experiences necessary to create, analyze, implement, evaluate, and affect policy in a multicultural, multiethnic society.

As a Public Policy & International Affairs Junior Summer Institute Fellow, Hussein will spend seven weeks at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. The program’s mission is to increase leadership opportunities for future global policy leaders in both the public and nonprofit sectors by preparing students for graduate study in related fields.

“The Junior Summer Institute is a highly focused and rigorous academic program that will help you gain a comprehensive understanding of the Woodrow Wilson School and the opportunities available in the fields of public policy and international affairs,” says Jose Ochoa, director of MPP Admissions and Programs Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton.

The program begins June 10 and ends July 30.

“I applied because I knew this is going to change my post-Wesleyan education significantly to an extent that it will provide me with unprecedented

Faculty, Guests Discuss “Stem Cells into the Clinic”

Lori Gruen, associate professor of philosophy, associate professor of feminist, gender and sexuality studies, speaks during a symposium titled "Stem Cells into the Clinic: Biological, Ethical and Regulatory Concerns," Jan. 28 in the Goldsmith Family Cinema. The event was sponsored by the Dachs Chair, the Faust Lectures in Ethics, and the Ethics in Society Project.

Lori Gruen, associate professor of philosophy, associate professor of feminist, gender and sexuality studies, speaks during a symposium titled "Stem Cells into the Clinic: Biological, Ethical and Regulatory Concerns," Jan. 28 in the Goldsmith Family Cinema. The event was sponsored by the Dachs Chair, the Faust Lectures in Ethics, and the Ethics in Society Project.

Keynote speaker Bonnie Steinbock, professor of bioethics at the Union Graduate College-Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and professor of philosophy at the University of Albany spoke on “The Ethics of Stem Cell Policy." Her research focuses on the ethics of reproduction and genetics.

Keynote speaker Bonnie Steinbock, professor of bioethics at the Union Graduate College-Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and professor of philosophy at the University of Albany spoke on “The Ethics of Stem Cell Policy." Her research focuses on the ethics of reproduction and genetics.

Stephen Latham, deputy director of Yale University's Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics, and Laura Grabel, the Lauren B. Dachs Professor of Science and Society, professor of biology, joined Gruen and Steinbock in a panel discussion of "Stem Cell Research in the Obama Era."

Stephen Latham, deputy director of Yale University's Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics, and Laura Grabel, the Lauren B. Dachs Professor of Science and Society, professor of biology, joined Gruen and Steinbock in a panel discussion of "Stem Cell Research in the Obama Era."

Dr. Irving Weissman, professor of pathology and developmental biology at the Stanford School of Medicine and director of the Stanford Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, spoke on “Normal and Neoplastic Stem Cells. Weissman’s research focuses on hematopoietic stem cell biology. Other speakers at the symposium included Gordon Carmichael, professor of genetics and developmental biology at the University of Connecticut Health Center, and Valerie Horsley, assistant professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology at Yale University. Carmichael, who spoke on “Double Stranded and Noncoding RNAs in Human Embryonic Stem Cells” studies molecular signals which control the expression and function of mRNA molecules. Horsley, who spoke on “Intrinsic and Extrinsic Control of Skin Stem Cells," studies the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control stem cell activity and function within epithelia, the tissues that line internal organs and outer surfaces. (Photos by Olivia Bartlett Drake)

Dr. Irving Weissman, professor of pathology and developmental biology at the Stanford School of Medicine and director of the Stanford Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, spoke on “Normal and Neoplastic Stem Cells. Weissman’s research focuses on hematopoietic stem cell biology. Other speakers at the symposium included Gordon Carmichael, professor of genetics and developmental biology at the University of Connecticut Health Center, and Valerie Horsley, assistant professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology at Yale University. Carmichael, who spoke on “Double Stranded and Noncoding RNAs in Human Embryonic Stem Cells” studies molecular signals which control the expression and function of mRNA molecules. Horsley, who spoke on “Intrinsic and Extrinsic Control of Skin Stem Cells," studies the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control stem cell activity and function within epithelia, the tissues that line internal organs and outer surfaces. (Photos by Olivia Bartlett Drake)