NS&B Alumni Speak to Students, Faculty About Post-Wesleyan Life

Dan Austin '08 speaks to students and faculty on "Research opportunities before graduate/medical school: The national Institutes of Health IRTA Post-Baccalaureate Fellowship," during the second Neuroscience and Behavior Symposium Feb. 20 in Exley Science Center. Austin was one of five NS&B alumni who returned to campus to speak at the symposium. While a student, Austin received university honors, the CBIA/CURE Bioscience Fellowship; and the Hawk Prize in Chemistry.

Dan Austin '08 speaks to students and faculty on "Research opportunities before graduate/medical school: The National Institutes of Health IRTA Post-Baccalaureate Fellowship," during the second Neuroscience and Behavior Symposium Feb. 20 in Exley Science Center. Austin was one of five NS&B alumni who returned to campus to speak at the symposium. While a student, Austin received university honors, the CBIA/CURE Bioscience Fellowship; and the Hawk Prize in Chemistry. He currently is a pre-doctorial fellow at the National Institutes of Health.

Joshua Hunsberger '00 spoke on "Leaving Wes: a scientist's journey from graduate school to a post doc." Hunsberger received his Ph.D from Yale University. He is currently a post-doctorial fellow at the National Institutes of Health.

Joshua Hunsberger '01 spoke on "Leaving Wes: a scientist's journey from graduate school to a post doc." Hunsberger received his Ph.D from Yale University. He is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the National Institutes of Health.

Hunsberger, a 2001 recipient of the Acheson & Grass Foundation Prize in Neuroscience, does research on how research on how exercise affects the brain, so at the beginning of his presentation, he made everyone do 10 jumping-jacks.

Hunsberger, a 2001 recipient of the Acheson & Grass Foundation Prize in Neuroscience, does research on how research on how exercise affects the brain, so at the beginning of his presentation, he made everyone do 10 jumping-jacks.

At left, David Bodznick, dean of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, professor of neuroscience and behavior, professor of biology, and John Kirn, professor and chair of the Neuroscience and Behavior Program, director of graduate studies, professor of biology, enjoy the alumni presentations. Bodznick and Kirn encouraged undergraduates to participate in the symposium.

At left, David Bodznick, dean of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, professor of neuroscience and behavior, professor of biology, and John Kirn, professor and chair of the Neuroscience and Behavior Program, director of graduate studies, professor of biology, enjoy the alumni presentations. Bodznick and Kirn encouraged undergraduates to participate in the symposium.

Lianne Morris-Smith '05, MA '06 spoke on "From Lab Coats to Scrubs: Finding the Right Fit." Morris-Smith is a 2005 recipient of the Acheson & Grass Foundation Prize in Neuroscience. She is currently a M.D. student at Harvard Medical School.

Lianne Morris-Smith '05, MA '06 spoke on "From Lab Coats to Scrubs: Finding the Right Fit." Morris-Smith is a 2005 recipient of the Acheson & Grass Foundation Prize in Neuroscience. She is currently a M.D. student at Harvard Medical School.

Janice Naegele, professor of neuroscience and behavior, professor of biology, introduced her former students, Dan Austin and Jenna Gopilan '07, MA '08 at the symposium. Gopilan, a senior research associate at Vertex Pharmaceuticals, spoke on "Gaining experience in the biotech industry." Another alumnus, Mauricio Delgado '97, assistant professor of psychology at Rutgers University, spoke on “Aversive processing in the human brain."  The symposium was funded by Michael Hanna '93, Ph.D. (Photos by Lauren Valentino '10)

Janice Naegele, professor of neuroscience and behavior, professor of biology, introduced her former students, Dan Austin and Jenna Gopilan '07, MA '08 at the symposium. Gopilan, a senior research associate at Vertex Pharmaceuticals, spoke on "Gaining experience in the biotech industry." Another alumnus, Mauricio Delgado '97, assistant professor of psychology at Rutgers University, spoke on “Aversive processing in the human brain." The symposium was funded by Michael Hanna '93, Ph.D. (Photos by Lauren Valentino '10)