Sickle Cell Disease Discussed at Benefit Dinner

Wesleyan, in conjunction with the New England Sickle Cell Institute and the Citizens for Quality Sickle Cell Care hosted a benefit dinner for sickle cell disease awareness and research on Nov. 10 in the Daniel Family Commons.

Wesleyan, in conjunction with the New England Sickle Cell Institute and the Citizens for Quality Sickle Cell Care, hosted a benefit dinner for sickle cell disease awareness and research on Nov. 10 in the Daniel Family Commons.

Sickle cell disease is caused by a faulty gene that affects how red blood cells develop. These unusually shaped red blood cells can become stuck in blood vessels and don't live as long as healthy, normal blood cells. Sickle cell disease mainly affects people of African, Caribbean, Middle Eastern, Eastern Mediterranean and Asian origin. 

Sickle cell disease is caused by a genetic abnormality that affects how red blood cells develop. These unusually shaped red blood cells can become stuck in blood vessels and don’t live as long as healthy, normal blood cells. Sickle cell disease mainly affects people of African, Caribbean, Middle Eastern, Eastern Mediterranean and Asian origin.

Guest speakers shared their experiences on the ways sickle cell disease has impacted their lives, and staff from various organizations spoke about their cause. Attendees were treated to dinner in exchange for making a donation to sickle cell research. 

Guest speakers shared their experiences on the ways sickle cell disease has impacted their lives, and staff from various organizations spoke about their cause. Attendees were treated to dinner in exchange for making a donation to sickle cell research.

eve_sicklecell_2016-1110184149

The event was organized by Shardonay Pagett ’18 and Praise Owoyemi ’18. “The goal of the benefit dinner was to bring awareness and provide up to date information about this illness, as well as raise money to go towards sickle cell research,” Owoyemi said. (Photos by Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19)