Angle, Glick to Speak at Human Rights Teach-Out

Stephen Angle

Stephen Angle

Megan Glick

Megan Glick

Wesleyan faculty Stephen Angle and Megan Glick are participating in a Global Human Rights Teach-Out Oct. 17–20, hosted on Coursera.

The Teach-Out will address the various dimensions of human rights. Participants will join citizens from all over the world to contribute to an online discussion on various human rights with scholarly input in the form of podcasts from over 20 academic instructors, including some contributions from advocacy groups addressing the urgency of issues.

The event will end with a live-streamed discussion, hosted in The Hague by Leiden University, where participants can ask questions of some of the speakers as well as participants from all over the world.

Angle, who is the event’s first speaker, will discuss “Is ‘Human Rights’ a Western Concept?” on Oct. 17. Glick will speak on “The Figure of the ‘Animal’ in Human Rights Discourses” on Oct. 18.

To view the entire schedule or enroll in the teach-out, visit Coursera.

Angle, Mansfield Freeman Professor of East Asian Studies and professor of philosophy, is also director, Center for Global Studies, and professor, East Asian studies. A philosophy writer and researcher specializing in Chinese Philosophy, Confucianism, Neo-Confucianism, and comparative philosophy, Angle’s research focuses on philosophy’s role in human rights, politics, and ethics both in China and globally. Angle’s work is informed by an ongoing exchange of ideas with colleagues in universities in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Germany, and France, and through his international philosophy blog. Fluent in Mandarin and in classical Chinese, Angle has spent Fulbright years in Taipei and in Beijing, and was a Berggruen Fellow at Tsinghua University in Beijing during the academic year 2016–17.

Glick, assistant professor of American studies; assistant professor, science in society; also is coordinator of disability studies. Her research and teaching focus on representations of difference along lines of race, gender, disability, and speciation, from both cultural and scientific perspectives. Her first book is forthcoming in November 2018 from Duke University Press’s ANIMA series and is titled Infrahumanisms: Science, Culture, and the Making of Modern Non/personhood. At Wesleyan, she teaches numerous courses across cultural studies and the medical humanities.