All News

Data Services Manager Embraces Full-Time Position  with The Wesleyan Fund


Marcy Herlihy will be promoted to associate director of Wesleyan Fund Internal Operations. She’s spent the past two years working with the fund and Data Services.
 
Posted 07/28/06
In just under five years at Wesleyan, Marcy Herlihy’s role has changed three times. Next month, her responsibilities will change again, all for the better of the university.

Herlihy was hired in October 2001 as the assistant director of The Wesleyan Annual Fund, which is now known as The Wesleyan Fund. Two years ago, she took over the role of manager of UR’s Data Services, but has continued to divide her time between data and fund responsibilities. When the newly-created position, manager of University Relations Information Systems is filled, Herlihy will become the associate director for the Wesleyan Fund Internal Operations, and support the Wesleyan Fund full-time.

“All of these changes have been good for the department and they’ve always been a good fit for me,” she says. “It’s a win-win situation for all.”

Since she currently splits her time between Data Services and The Wesleyan Fund, giving each one equal attention can be a challenge, Herlihy says.

For her Wesleyan Fund role, she spends a good deal of time in meetings with her UR and Office of University Communications colleagues, planning, scheduling and producing upcoming communication materials or working on the various Wesleyan Fund solicitation programs. For her Data Services role, she manages and oversees the maintenance of the alumni and parent database, manages donor records and oversees the processing of gifts and pledges. In addition, she maintains The Wesleyan Fund Web site and works with Wesleyan’s student Red & Black Society callers.

Deb Treister, director for University Relations Operations, works with Herlihy on a daily basis. They’ve developed an online giving Web page, a volunteer module in WesNet, and serve on the WesNet Committee together. WesNet is Wesleyan’s alumni online community.

“Marcy is the perfect colleague,” Treister says. “She’s extremely detail orientated and very pleasant to be around and work with. She has a great sense of humor, which can be very important in our line of work.”

It helps that she doesn’t have to split her location when she is splitting her time. The Wesleyan Fund, including Data Services, moved to its own building on Mt. Vernon St. in November 2005.

“It is wonderful that we have this new space, and we’re all together, and I love that I can finally be settled in one location,” she says from her sunny office that overlooks the Annual Fund calling area.

“It keeps me pretty busy,” she says, smiling.

Gifts that are made to The Wesleyan Fund are crucial for the entire university. The fund supports the university’s operating budget, which includes financial aid, staff and faculty salaries, the upkeep and maintenance of facilities and student services.

This year the Wesleyan Fund team raised $11.8 million, with 54 percent of alumni participation. But next year, since the university will look to rely less on its endowment, the team’s goal is to raise over $15 million.

“Raising $11.8 million was tough, and raising $15 million will be a lot of hard work, but I am optimistic that we can do this,” she says. “It would be so wonderful for the university.”

Herlihy is no stranger to the Wesleyan campus. She grew up in Portland, Conn., the town across the bridge from Middletown, and frequented the campus her entire life.

“When I was a child, I would take classes at Wesleyan Potters so I got to know some people from the Wesleyan community, and I also went to Wesleyan football games in the fall and of course I’d go sledding down Foss Hill in the winter,” she recalls. “With the exception of a few new buildings, campus looks pretty much the same as it did then.”

But “never in a million years” did Herlihy think she would end up working at Wesleyan.

Herlihy says a college job prompted her to want to work in a fund-raising field. As a student at the University of Vermont, she worked in that school’s development office and enjoyed it. After college, a friend of her family suggested she look into an open position at Wesleyan. Herlihy applied, and has been here ever since.

Ironically, Herlihy didn’t major in public relations or a fund-raising field. She graduated with a bachelor’s of science in horticulture and sustainable agriculture. Nevertheless, she continues to put her degree to work. At her home in Ivoryton, Conn., Herlihy and her husband, Rory, and golden retriever, Annie, spend an abundance of time in the yard.

“Gardening and landscaping are my biggest hobbies, and I love vegetable and perennial gardens,” she says. “But we also have been busy planting a funky shrub garden in front of our house. We used some interesting maples and unusual shrubs. My parents like to say I majored in a hobby.”
 

By Olivia Drake, The Wesleyan Connection editor

The Wesleyan Connection: Campus Snapshot

SUMMER SERIES : East L.A.-based Quetzal performed as part of the Center for the Arts Nights series June 29. The group was found by guitarist/jarana/bajo sexto player Quetzal Flores, who brings a grass-roots approach to fusing the folk styles of Mexico and Cuba along with elements of rock and blues.

Quetzal’s beats got the audience dancing in the aisles of Crowell Concert Hall. The concert was intended to be outside but rainy weather moved it indoors.
Quetzal kicked off the CFA Night Series, which also includes upcoming performances Eclipse: Visions of the Crescent and the Cross Forces of Nature Dance Theatre Company on July 6-7; Tim Crouch: An Oak Tree on July 20; and Jane Bunnett & Spirits of Havana on July 27. (Photos by Olivia Bartlett)

Kay Butterfield Celebrates 100th Birthday at Wesleyan


Friends and family celebrated Kay Butterfield’s 100th birthday July 27 in the Office of the President. Kay Butterfield is the wife of the late Victor Butterfield, who served as Wesleyan’s president 1943-1967. Pictured above is Middletown Mayor Sebastian Giuliano declaring July 27 Kay Butterfield Day in the City of Middletown.
Posted 07/28/06
Kay Butterfield, wife of former Wesleyan President Victor Butterfield, turned 100 July 27. She celebrated the day with friends and family during a celebration at the President’s House.

Kay has lived a life of idealism and service. She was born July 27, 1906 in Brooklyn, N.Y., the daughter of Philip Geyer and Sophie Westerman Geyer. Her grandfather, Philip Geyer, Sr. had emigrated from Bavaria, settling first in Newark, N.J, where he and his brothers established a brewery. The family moved to Brooklyn, and Kay’s father followed his father into the profession of Master Brewer, eventually owning Frank’s Brewery.

In 1919, the 18th Amendment to the Constitution, prohibition, caused a reversal of fortune for the Geyer family, which had all its assets invested in the family brewery. One result was that Kay would eventually have to finance her own college education.

Kay graduated from Girls’ High School in Brooklyn in 1922, one month shy of her 16th birthday. In the spring of her senior year, searching the school bulletin board for employment opportunities, she spotted a notice for a city-wide essay contest for a one-year scholarship to the Manhattan Business School. She won the prize, attended in 1922-23, and then earned enough money as a legal secretary on Wall Street to pay for her first year of college.

In 1924, Kay entered Cornell University as a freshman. She was the publicity manager for the Women’s Varsity Council; the women’s editor for the Cornell Daily Sun, a varsity member of the women’s basketball team; and president of Delta Gamma Sorority. She also was involved in Alpha Chi Alpha, the honor society for journalism; Raven and Serpent, the junior honor society; and Mortarboard, the senior honor society.

During her junior year at Cornell, Kay met Victor Lloyd Butterfield at a dance. The duo got married June 11, 1928. Two days later, Kay graduated with a bachelor’s of art in English. She had paid her entire way through college by working as a secretary and typing student papers, and as a legal secretary in Manhattan during the summers.

The Butterfields moved to Deerfield, Mass. where Vic taught and coached at Deerfield Academy and Kay taught fifth and sixth grade in a single classroom in the Deerfield Elementary School. She called it “baptism by fire.”

In 1929, Vic joined the faculty of the Riverdale Country School in the Bronx. Kay taught mathematics to all grades at the Neighborhood School in Riverdale. An apartment and meals were included at Riverdale, allowing them to save all their earnings for graduate school for Vic. In 1931, the couple moved to Cambridge, Mass., where Vic entered Harvard as a Ph.D candidate. Kay became a door-to-door salesperson and typed doctoral theses for extra income. Her habits of thrift and industry enabled Vic and Kay to spend the summer of 1934 in Europe after Vic’s resident Ph.D work was completed.

Vic was hired by Wesleyan as the dean of Admission from 1935 to 1941, and worked as the associate dean from 1941 to 1942, acting president in 1942, then president from 1943 to 1967.

In 1938, the Butterfields built their first house on a four-acre plot on Randolph Road in Middletown. Kay cut all the studs and joists with a power saw, cut rock wool into bats for the insulation, and secured them with slats that she nailed in. They lived there until Vic’s appointment as president in 1943 and, then moved to a brick house on High Street. When the war ended, they moved into the President’s House at 269 High. After Vic’s retirement, they went back to their beloved small house on Randolph Road.

During the years of Vic’s presidency, Kay was heavily involved in college life. She loved the seminars, conferences, concerts, and the sporting events. She was a regular at games and matches, particularly football, basketball, and wrestling. She volunteered for decades at the Wesleyan Blood Drive, registering donors, as well as donating blood herself.

Much of her energy went toward the job of entertaining at the President’s House. Money was scarce in those days, and badly needed to improve faculty salaries. So Kay economized by cooking and baking for receptions and dinners for trustees, faculty, students and honorary degree recipients. On one occasion, during a period of intense rivalry in football between Trinity and Wesleyan, she even cooked and served dinner for both varsity teams on the night before the big game.

Kay became involved early on in the Middletown community. Before her own children were born, she was a Girl Scout leader. The YMCA was her earliest and longest commitment. As a member of the Women’s Board, she help nurture the girls’ club. She also raised large sums of money for the YMCA through her chairmanship of the Y’s annual Tour of Homes. When the women’s lounge needed new slipcovers, Kay and her fellow board members brought their sewing machines for a bee, and made them all themselves. It was through the “Y” that Kay was a long-time member of the Middletown League of Women Voters, as well as its president from 1936-37. She was also a member of the Board of Education (1952-1965), an annual campaigner for the United Way, and a Board member of Connecticut Citizens for Public Schools.

She also had a long connection with the Davison Art Center. In the early 1960s, Curator Heinrich Schwarz, hoping to add to the large print collection left to Wesleyan by George W. class of 1892 and Harriet Davison, proposed to Kay the idea of forming a “Friends of the Davison Art Center” to raise money for acquisitions.

Kay has been the recipient of a number of awards for her service, including the B’nai B’rith “Woman of the Year” award in the 1950s, the Baldwin Medal for service to Wesleyan in 1982, and received an honorary “Doctor of Humane Letters” from Wesleyan in 1997.

In the late 1960s, after Vic’s retirement from Wesleyan, Kay renewed her ties to the First Church of Christ, Middletown, which she had joined in the 1950s. Kay taught Sunday School until she was in her 90s, and after the Vietnam War, she tutored children from Vietnam and Cambodia through the church.

In the mid 1990s, she wrote a series of essays for the Middletown Press on backyard bird-watching, on her particular pleasure in crows, on Elderhostels, on her two hip replacements, and on her decision at the age of 94 to leave her beloved Randolph Road home and move to One MacDonough Place, where she now resides.

Another great love of Kay’s throughout her life has been music, and particularly singing. She had a huge repertoire – everything from Vaudeville to Negro Spirituals. Kay still loves singing – now with the One MacDonough Singers.

In honor of her 100 years, the Governor’s Office proclaimed July 27 as Kay Butterfield Day in the State of Connecticut, and the Mayor’s Office declared July 27 as Kay Butterfield Day in the City of Middletown.

 
Photos by Olivia Drake, Wesleyan Connection editor. Text contributed.

Wesleyan Breaks Fund-Raising Record, Garners Award


Max Schenkein ’08 chats with an alumnus during a Wesleyan Fund fund-raising drive. Below, Sean Collins ’08 and Ana Lombera ’09 request gifts for Wesleyan. The student callers, along with staff in University Relations, helped raise more than $35 million this past year.
Posted 07/28/06
Wesleyan enters its 175th anniversary year celebration with a tremendous gift from its alumni, friends, and other supporters: a record-breaking $35,054,196 in cash gifts, surpassing the 2005 record by $3.7 million.

These funds will support financial aid, faculty, facilities, and programs. Fifty-four percent of alumni participated in giving to Wesleyan in 2006, equaling 2005’s participation rate.

The official tally, announced this week by Barbara-Jan Wilson, vice president for University Relations, marks a significant milestone for Wesleyan.

“This generous support ensures Wesleyan’s future and announces to the worldwide Wesleyan community that our University is strong, getting stronger, and will be here for future generations,” Wilson says.

Wilson added that the Board of Trustees, President Douglas Bennet, alumni and parent volunteers including the Development Committee and the University Relations staff, are vital members of Wesleyan’s fund-raising effort.

“This development team represents a rare convergence of talent, skill, professionalism, dedication, and energy,” Wilson says.

The Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) agrees with Wilson. CASE has awarded Wesleyan the CASE-Wealth ID Award for Educational Fund Raising: Overall Performance in the Private Liberal Arts Institutions category. In 2002, Wealth ID, a provider of wealth screening services and fund-raising solutions, joined CASE as a sponsor of the Educational Fund Raising Awards.

“What is best about the CASE Award is that this honor was awarded not for what Wesleyan received, but for what so many alumni, staff, and friends gave,” Wilson says. “The more we give, the more we receive. That defines the Wesleyan experience.”

“Wesleyan, already ranked highly for academic excellence, now demonstrates an exemplary new standard of excellence in support of private education through its fund-raising performance,” says Mark Bailey, director of Development Communications.

CASE, a nonprofit education association, supports educational institutions by enhancing the effectiveness of the alumni relations, communications and fund-raising professionals who serve it.

Other winners in the private liberal arts institution category include Amherst College in Massachusetts; Berea College in Kentucky; Bowdoin College in Maine; Middlebury College in Vermont; and Wellesley College in Massachusetts.

 
By Justin Harmon, vice president for Public Affairs. Photos contributed by Regan Schubel.

ITS VP Says His Department Can Handle Any Technology Problem


Ganesan “Ravi” Ravishanker has worked at Wesleyan 20 years. He was recently promoted to associate vice president of Information Technology Services.
 
Posted 07/07/06
When there’s nothing broken, don’t try to fix it.

That’s how Ganesan “Ravi” Ravishanker feels about Information Technology Services. The newly-promoted associate vice president of ITS says the university can feel comfortable that its technology needs are in good hands.

“I inherited a very hard working organization and I’m not intending to change anything drastically within the department,” Ravishanker says from his fifth floor office in Exley Science Center. “Technology problems can arise and hit us very fast, and our department is very capable of responding to these situations.”

This has always been the case, he says.

When Ravishanker arrived at Wesleyan 20 years ago, he shared a dual appointment in the former Wesleyan Computing Center and the Chemistry Department with David Beveridge, the University Professor of the Sciences and Mathematics and professor of chemistry. Professor Beveridge’s group measured the movement of DNA molecules over time using molecular modeling program. Though they could only capture the motions over a hundred picoseconds (1 picosecond is one-trillionth of a second) the results from these simulations were huge.

He and Beveridge developed a program called Molecular Dynamics Analysis Toolchest, to analyze and present this data in a concise graphical format. This is still in active use by several molecular modeling labs.

“Keep in mind, this is 1986. Computer power was very limited, but we were doing cutting-edge simulations of DNA,” Ravishanker says. “It was very rare for a small university to have the computer equipment we had, and that has always been one of the best parts about working at Wesleyan. We are always able to go looking for the next best thing in technology and implement them.”

As technology became more complex, so did Ravishanker’s responsibilities. Although he enjoyed working in the Beveridge lab, he was offered a full-time management position in the Wesleyan Computing Center. The number of people using personal computers and applications such as e-mail was growing in leaps and bounds, and the Internet was just beginning to take form. Managing all these posed special challenges and Ravishanker wanted to be part of this, and jumped at the opportunity.

“I feel very privileged that I got to be part of the evolution of the Internet right from the start,” he says. “I had no idea the Internet would become so huge and simplify lives the way that it has. It’s been nothing but an exciting journey here.”

From 1994-1996, the Wesleyan Computing Center under went several iterations and changes in management. Ravishanker spent a year as interim director and was later promoted to director of Technology Support Services. He stayed in this role until June 2006, when he was promoted as associate VP.

“Ravi is one of the most energetic, customer-orientated, bright, down to earth, collegial people that I have ever worked with,” says John Meerts, vice president for Finance and Administration. “I’m supremely confident he will guide ITS in a superb fashion in his new VP role.”

Ravishanker leads monthly meetings for the entire ITS department to keep everyone abreast on each other’s projects and upcoming deadlines. He offers help and advice to anyone who needs it, and enjoys taking on his own projects when time allows.

Ravishanker is the E-Portfolio’s author and wrote several of its applications, such as the bulk email system and various e-mail tools. He’s mastered several programming languages including as Java, FORTRAN and PERL and understands all e-mail, server and networking issues on campus.

“I used to be a very hands-on manager,” he says. “I wanted to be able to do anything anyone else in this department can do, in addition to being a manager. But that has to change now.”

Ravishanker, a native of Sri Lanka, attended college in southern India and earned a Ph.D in theoretical chemistry Hunter College of the City University of New York. He has always had an interest in technology.

In his new VP role, Ravishanker has two immediate goals in mind. He wants to make Web Mail more efficient. A group of ITS staff are currently implementing various technologies to accomplish this. He also wants to explore with the cooperation of ITS staff opportunities available through Web 2.0 and see how these services can be advantageous to Wesleyan. The term Web 2.0 refers to a second generation of services available on the World Wide Web that allows users to collaborate and share information online. He cites blogs and wikis as examples of Web 2.0 technologies. Leading by example, the “gone paperless” guru already uses a Web 2.0 blog to communicate with his department.

“Applying new Web technologies to enhance the sense of community and help collaborate better will be our goal in the coming year,” he says.

Ravishanker spends his free time playing golf and the occasional game of cricket. But he returns to the computer for his ultimate hobby – tuning into South-Indian music stations.

“I’m always humming along with them,” he says, smiling.
 

By Olivia Drake, The Wesleyan Connection editor

Chris Potter: Hockey, Golf Coach Busy on the Greens and Ice


Posted 07/07/06
Q: Chris, you’re the head men’s ice hockey coach and the head golf coach. How do you manage doing both?

A: I have a strong passion for both sports and I enjoy coaching both teams. It does get a little crazy, but being organized helps. Also, I have great support for both programs. Lastly, I am very fortunate to coach great student-athletes. They are very motivated and they know what it takes to balance their academics with athletics, which is not always easy.

Q: Who are your assistant coaches?

A: Jim Langlois and Matt Plante are assistant coaches in hockey. Jeff Gilarde is my assistant for golf. He has a great passion for the game and loves working with the players. Matt has been with me for two years and has been a tremendous asset for the program. We have been heavily recruiting for the past two years and he has done a great job. Jim has been with Wesleyan Hockey for more than 20 years and has a lot of experience in coaching. Having good people working with you is extremely important.

Q: How long have you coached at Wesleyan?

A: I have coached the hockey team for three years and the golf team for two and a half years.

Q: Do you consider ice hockey and golf at all similar?

A: I would have to say yes and no. I think the obvious reason for it not being the same is hockey is more of a team sport than golf. Golf you are out there on your own and you have to deal with ups and downs on your own. Golf can really test you mentally. Hockey from a coaching perspective is more difficult. We practice four days a week, focusing on how to get the team to work together to achieve our goal: winning. The team relies on individuals and the individuals rely on the team. I think where they may overlap is dealing with people on an individual basis. Coaching golf I tend to rely on coaching the individual and that can carry over to hockey. Not everyone is motivated the same way. Coaching golf has helped my coaching ability with hockey.

Q: How old were you when you began playing sports?

A: I started playing hockey when I was 4. I also played baseball growing up.

Q: At the University of Connecticut, you were a four-year ice hockey letterman, an All-American as a senior and a two-time all-NECAC and all-New England selection. When did you decide that you wanted to be a coach and where did you first coach?

A: At first, I always wanted to play. I was playing in Roanoke, Virginia after college and I really started to understand the game and learn more about coaching. I played for Frank Anzalone and he had a strong passion for the game and coaching. He was extremely detailed and always prepared. I finished my third year and received a call from my college coach Bruce Marshall. They started a graduate assistant program and asked me if I was interested. It was a great opportunity to get into coaching and further my education.

Q: What did you major in at UConn?

A: I graduated with an economics degree and earned my master’s in education.

Q: What classes do you, or have you taught, as an adjunct associate professor of physical education?

A: I teach a golf class, intro to skating and a fitness class.

Q: In 1997, you got involved with the USA Hockey-Team New England as an instructor, assistant coach, and later as a head coach. Are you still involved with this team?

A: I was fortunate to get involved with Team New England when I coached at UConn. Jim Tortorella at Colby College was the program director. I am still involved today and have also coached at the national festival for the 17 age group. New England is one of many districts in USA hockey. Every summer, New England runs a 13,14,15, and 16 camp in Burlington, Vermont. In conjunction with those camps we select players to participate in the national camps held in St. Cloud, Minnesota and Rochester, New York. For the past six years I have coached at the 17 festival, which this year is July 7-14. It is a great opportunity to see the best 17’s in the country and learn more about the game. Dallas Bossort, the NESCAC Rookie of the Year, played for Team Dakota at the 17 festival.

Q: Do you follow the National Hockey League?

A: I do follow the NHL and I am very pleased with the rule changes and the leagues focus on improving the game. I am a Bruins fan but disappointed with the trade of Joe Thorton. I always enjoy watching the Red Wings play.

Q: What months does the hockey season span? Golf season?

A: Golf has two seasons. We have a fall schedule and a spring schedule. The golf team will begin practice in September. We get right into it. The NESCAC’s are Sept. 9-10. It’s like playing for the championship the first week of practice. We finish the fall season in October and hockey picks up Nov. 1. Hockey feels like two seasons because we have six to seven games before exam break and Christmas break. The players are off the ice for about two weeks. They return the first week of January and we play every weekend into the first weekend in March. After the playoffs and depending how far we go it usually ends middle of March right before Spring Break.

Q: Where does the golf team practice and play?

A: We have a great relationship with Lyman Orchards in Middlefield. They have two 18-hole courses and a great practice facility.

Q: In your opinion, what makes an ideal student-athlete? Would you like to mention any individuals who will be key players on the teams next year?

A: I think we have a lot of the ideal student-athletes here at Wesleyan. You have to be self-motivated and utilize good management skills to be able to balance both. We have a good core of players coming back next year and the addition of some new faces. Will Bennett has been the team’s captain for two years and he will be joined by Ryan Hendrickson. Last season our goaltending emerged. Freshman Mike Palladino did a tremendous job in the first half and when Dave Scardella returned he stepped up and helped our team into the playoffs, which earned him NESCAC 2nd Team. I was also very pleased with our D-core last year the sophomores took another step and the freshman class really adjusted well. Dallas Bossort was recognized as the NESCAC Rookie of the Year.

Q: Do you continue to play hockey and golf aside from coaching the sports?

A: I do more golf than hockey, but I do occasionally skate. There is a charity league in Rhode Island I get to every now and then.

Q: Do you have any free time?

A: My wife, Lisa, and I have 15 nieces and nephews, so between spending time with them and hockey and golf, I am always busy.

Q: What are your thoughts on working in Wesleyan’s Athletic Department?

A: I have really enjoyed working here at Wesleyan. Duke Snyder built a tremendous hockey program and impressed a lot of people and they continue to give back. I have been amazed at the support. I look forward to adding to these two programs and continue to improve them everyday.
 

By Olivia Drake, The Wesleyan Connection editor

Summer Programs Extend Learning Year-Round


Harry Saranchak, a Wesleyan Writers Conference participant, reviews his writing outside the Davenport Campus Center June 19. The conference is one of 31 campus programs occurring this summer at Wesleyan.
Posted 07/06/06
Learning never ceases at Wesleyan, even in the summer.

 

The Cardinal Hoop Clinic. The Russian Intensive Program. The Health Professions Partnership Initiative. These are just a few of 31 on campus programs running during the summer months.

 

The programs are not just for college-aged students, either. Many are specifically designed for younger children and adults.

 

The programs actually began this year before the class of 2006 attended commencement May 18 with the Russian Intensive Program. May closed with the opening of the Hughes Summer Research Program.

 

June’s highlights included 50th edition of The Wesleyan Writers Conference and the beginning of the six-week-long Upward Bound program, which is designed to prepare selected students academically and socially for the upcoming school year. In addition to academics, students participate in activities addressing the issues which affect today’s teens: AIDS, teen pregnancy, drugs and alcohol.

From June 26-August 11, Wesleyan’s Project to Increase Mastery of Mathematics and Science  (PIMMS) holds nine day-long summer institutes for area teachers. Teachers can take workshops on problem solving; using math games and activities to teach estimation; helping students master fractions, ratios, proportions and percents; and using technology in the classroom.

The Health Professions Partnership Initiative (HPPI) began June 26 and ends August 4. Through this program, minorities who recently graduated high school can explore health professions. At Wesleyan, the students have the option to study anatomy, biochemistry, biology, biophysics, biotechnology, chemistry, pre dentistry, dentistry, epidemiology, biomedical engineering, genetics, pre-medicine, nursing, nutrition, pathology, pre-pharmacology, pharmacology, psychology, public health, science and biostatistics.

Several programs focus on athletics. The Cardinal Softball Camp, Summertime Sports Soccer Academy, Select Soccer Academy, Adult Baseball Clinic, Cardinal Field Hockey Camp, Fundamental Basketball Camps, The Lacrosse Schools, the East Coast Soccer Academy, the Total Volleyball Camp, and Tennis Camp all begin in July. Wesleyan coaches create the curriculum and teach at many of these camps, and Wesleyan student-athletes are often employed as instructors.

 

Summer activities round out Aug. 25 with International Student Orientation and New Student Orientation on Aug. 29.

 
By Olivia Drake, Wesleyan Connection editor

Classical Studies Welcomes Latin Literature Expert to Department


Lauren Caldwell, assistant professor of classical studies, will teach Latin and a course on Vergil’s Aeneid next fall.
 
Posted 07/06/06
Lauren Caldwell was hired as an assistant professor of classical studies on July 1.

Caldwell has an A.B. in Classics from Princeton University and received her M.A. and Ph.D from the University of Michigan. Her research interests are Roman social history, Latin literature, Roman law and ancient medicine.

Strong support for the faculty’s scholarly and pedagogical goals attracted Caldwell to Wesleyan.

“I am strongly committed to my research and to my teaching, and Wesleyan does a remarkable job of supporting faculty scholarship, while also focusing on undergraduate instruction,” Caldwell says. “Universities that successfully balance these two parts of academic life are rare, and for this reason I am thrilled to be at Wesleyan.”

Moreover, since the days when she wrote a senior undergraduate thesis on literacy in the Roman world, Caldwell has recognized the value of students’ receiving close guidance from faculty.

“Wesleyan is wonderful because its small size allows faculty to follow students through their time at the university, especially in their major,” she explains. “When I visited the campus and the Classical Studies Department, I was impressed by both the students – many of whom asked excellent questions about my research and teaching – and by the faculty, who are dedicated to advising students and helping them gain the most they can from their coursework. I wouldn’t be here today without the support of advisers and mentors, and I am happy to have the opportunity to give some of that back at Wesleyan.”

Caldwell comes to Wesleyan from the Department of Classics at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, where she was a visiting assistant professor. At Georgetown, she taught intermediate and advanced Latin, including the authors Cicero, Vergil, Tacitus and Apuleius. She also taught the History of the Roman Empire and courses on Roman Egypt, Roman law, ancient slavery and ancient medicine.

At Wesleyan, Caldwell will teach First-Year Latin and a course on Vergil’s Aeneid in the fall and focus on revising her book manuscript, Scripted Lives: Girls’ Coming of Age in the Early Roman Empire, for Cambridge University Press. Her other publications include “Roman Girls’ Transition to Marriage in Legal Thought,” in Finding Persephone: Women’s Rituals in the Ancient Mediterranean, forthcoming with Indiana University Press, 2007; and “Dido’s Deductio: Aeneid 4.127-168,” for Classical Philology.

Caldwell lives in Middletown with her husband, Bob, who is a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Classical Studies. In her spare time, she enjoys cooking, exploring Connecticut’s state parks, and, less often, traveling to Roman sites, most recently in Tunisia and Spain.
 

By Olivia Drake, The Wesleyan Connection editor

The Wesleyan Connection: Campus Snapshot

SUMMER LECTURE: Dana Royer, assistant professor of earth and environmental science, pictured in center in blue, speaks to an audience as part of The Hughes Program in the Life Sciences Summer Lecture Series June 14 in Shanklin 107. Royer’s talk was titled “What Fossils Can Tell Us about the Climate and Ecology of Earth Millions of Years Ago.” The Wesleyan University Hughes Grant was awarded to encourage participation and interest in the life sciences by undergraduates. The Lecture Series is ongoing throughout the summer and open to the public. (Photo by Olivia Bartlett)

Service-Learning Director Expands Program Across Several Departments


Rob Rosenthal, professor of sociology and director of the Service Learning Center will celebrate his 20th year at Wesleyan in 2007.
 
Posted 06/16/06
Six years ago, Rob Rosenthal’s community research seminar became so popular students were knocking on President Bennet’s door requesting more classes like it.

“What we discovered was that there was a great need for classes that emphasized service-learning,” says Rosenthal, who would become the director of the new Service-Learning Center. “It’s a great way for students to be of service for the community and learn at the same time.”

Service-learning classes mesh regular classroom study and lectures with experiences in the real world. Rosenthal meets with outside agency directors to discuss ways Wesleyan students can be of assistance and works with professors to develop classes. In the classes, students are partnered with an outside organization or agency.

In 2003, there were only a few SL classes available in a limited number of departments, but Rosenthal pushed for more courses across all disciplines and upped the number five courses a year. During the 2005-06 academic year, students were take service-learning classes in biology, music, psychology, earth and environmental sciences and dance.

“Just like when you’re taking a science class and you have textbooks, lectures and labs, in these classes, your lab is the real world,” Rosenthal explains. “It really adds a whole new dimension to learning and to teaching. It’s a fantastic pedagogical approach which encourages students to take control of their own education.”

Rosenthal cites two recent course examples. Last year, Katja Kolcio, assistant professor of dance, taught a service-learning course called Dance Teaching Workshop: Theory and Practice. In this theoretical and practical course, she taught Wesleyan students how to teach dance and movement to children and adults. Practical teaching and service outside of Wesleyan campus was required for the class.

Likewise, Timothy Ku, assistant professor of earth and environmental sciences, taught Environmental Geochemistry as a service-learning course. Students studied the quantitative treatment of chemical equilibrium in natural systems such as lakes, rivers, and the oceans in the classroom, and then constructed a study of the North End landfill for the City of Middletown to see if methane and other gases could be economically harvested.

Next year, students will be teaching community theater in a juvenile training center, conducting research at a local community health center, and mentoring Spanish-speaking students at an area elementary school.

“It’s just wonderful that students can study theories in class and then go out and test these theories and argue about them with each other, based on their actual experiences,” Rosenthal says.

Serving as director of the Service-Learning Center is only one hat Rosenthal wears on campus. He spends half his time teaching classes in the Department of Sociology. Each, he says, are equally rewarding positions.

As a professor of sociology, Rosenthal is an expert on housing, homelessness, social movements and the culture of social movements. He received his bachelor’s degree from Rutgers University and his master’s of arts and Ph.D from the University of California Santa Barbara. He studied sociology at both institutions.

Rosenthal is the author of 18 published articles, seven of which cover the topic of homelessness. His book, Homeless in Paradise received the Association for Humanist Sociology Book Award in 1995. He’s currently working on two books, The Persistence of Homelessness, and Playing for Change: Music in Social Movements, each to be published in 2007.

He teaches Introductory Sociology, Urban Sociology, Housing and Public Policy, and Music in Social Movements to undergrads, and recently taught Music in Social Movements to students enrolled in the Graduate Liberal Studies Program. In this class, Rosenthal questions how the actual use of music can create movement cultures. Students listen to musicians such as Bob Dylan, Woody Guthrie, Billie Holiday, Janis Joplin, Rage Against the Machine, and Public Enemy and discuss how their music relates to movements in the United States including the labor, civil rights, new left, women’s, and current inner city movements.

Knowing that their professor has a deep affection for all music, Rosenthal’s students stock his music collection with home-made compilation disks.

“The great thing about being the ‘music guy’ is that students like to bring me all kinds of music to listen to,” Rosenthal says. “I’m interested in all music genres. Even the best of death-metal will be good.”

When Rosenthal is not teaching, he enjoys listening to music on his own times, playing basketball, and spending time with his wife, Sunny, and children Sam, 18, and Annie, 15, at their home in Middletown.

After 19 years at Wesleyan, Rosenthal hopes his future at Wesleyan is “more of the same.”

“Wesleyan has become so much of a positive force, I hope to see more of that and be part of it,” he says.

 

By Olivia Drake, The Wesleyan Connection editor

Bennet Attends Forum on Education, Democracy


Posted 06/16/06
The Association of American Colleges and Universities invited Wesleyan President Doug Bennet to attend a forum June 22-23 in Strasbourg, France.

The forum, titled “The Responsibility of Higher Education for a Democratic Culture: Citizenship, Human Rights, and Civic Responsibility,” was held at the Council of Europe headquarters. The council co-sponsored the forum.

Bennet was one of 300 higher education leaders, policy makers and public authorities from North America and Europe to attend.

“For this select group, we chose President Bennet because we thought he would be especially effective representing United States higher education and he would likely use his influence to help underscore the importance of educating students to be informed, empowered and responsible local and global citizens after they graduate,” says Carol Geary Schneider, president of the AAC&U.

In addition to 12 years as Wesleyan’s president, Bennet has served as U.S. assistant secretary of state for international organizational affairs, as president of National Public Radio, and as head of the Agency for International Development and as Assistant Secretary of State for Congressional Relations..

The forum addressed a number of key issues including fostering democratic cultures; social cohesion and intercultural dialog; promoting human rights and democratic citizenship; teaching, research and engagement; building sustainable democratic communities; and knowledge, actions and civic responsibility.

“These issues are essential in terms of how we approach liberal education now and in the future,” said Bennet. “Our goal must be to enable students to become thoughtful innovators and conscientious global citizens who can engage the world around them and make it better.”

The forum explored the responsibility of higher education for advancing sustainable democratic culture and invited participants to discuss a declaration and practical follow-up activities.

 
By Olivia Drake, Wesleyan Connection editor and David Pesci, director of Media Relations

Professors, Alumni Perform and Direct in Tuba Ensemble in New York


Pictured at left, Stewart Gillmor, professor of history and science and professor of science in society, performs during “The Bang on a Can Marathon” June 4 in New York City. Below, Anthony Braxton, professor of music, directs the band. Braxton wrote the band’s composition.

Posted 06/16/06
Strutting outside the World Financial Center in New York City, Stewart Gillmor bellowed his five valve double-belled euphonium for thousands of spectators. He was one of 75 tuba players to march in the annual “The Bang on a Can Marathon” June 4 in New York City.

Gillmor, professor of history and science and professor of science in society, is a member of the Tuba Marching Band, directed by Wesleyan Professor of Music Anthony Braxton. Braxton’s band performed his own opus, “Composition No. 19,” a marching piece for tubas.

“It was quite a show, and quite a good, avant-garde thing to do in New York,” Gillmor says.
The “Bang on a Can Marathon” is a 10-hour eclectic super-mix of boundary-smashing genre-defying music by pioneering artists from around the world. It featured newly commissioned works by classical, electronica, jazz and rock artists. The New York Times heralded “Composition No. 19” as the “biggest spectacle at this year’s … marathon.”

With a baton in hand, Braxton led the tuba band with co-conductors and Wesleyan alumni Taylor Bynum ’98, James Fei ’99 and Matthew Welch ’01. Each conductor led a quarter of the band, with players horning with old European instruments called helicons, and sousaphones, tubas, mini-baritones and euphoniums.

Gillmor’s euphonium was rare. Most have three or four valves, but his 1940 Holton-brand has five, which allowed him to switch between two horn “bells” with the fifth key. It is one octave higher than that of a tuba.

“There were several real musicians there, some were symphony musicians, but most of us were not professionals,” Gillmor says. “Most of us were aspiring artists. It was a very geeky group.”

The uncomplicated melody of “Composition No. 19,” included fluttering notes, growls, 10-second solos, whispery sounds and several “blab, blab, blab,” sounds, Gilmore explains.

In addition to Braxton’s tuba band, performers included Julia Wolfe’s piece for six pianos; Yat Kha, a Tuvan-throat-singing Siberian punk band; Amiina, the all-female Icelandic ambient quartet; Bang on a Can drummer David Cossin with Wilco drummer Glenn Kotche; Björk collaborators Matmos with So Percussion; Evan Ziporyn’s Gamelan Galak Tika; cellist Maya Beiser; the group Alarm Will Sound; and Aphex Twin, among others.

The show finished inside the Winter Garden. Braxton’s group, which is made up of tuba and low brass players from New Jersey, Connecticut and New York, had only two rehearsals prior to the performance, one the day before, and then again on the day of.

“We sounded pretty good and the audience seemed to really like us,” Gillmor says.

 
By Olivia Drake, Wesleyan Connection editor. Photos by Stewart Gillmor III.