Tag Archive for Claire Potter

Campus Violence Topic of Key Issues Forum April 27

Almost half of college students have experienced abuse in a relationship, according to a 2008 study. Abuse can range from cyber- stalking to beatings and rape.

On April 27, Wesleyan University, The Hartford Courant and FOX CT will present a Key Issues Forum titled “The Person You Think You Know: Signs and Solutions of Campus Violence” at 6 p.m. in Beckham Hall. The forum will feature experts who will discuss relationship violence on campuses, including how to recognize danger signs and where to get help.

The panelists are:
Claire Potter, professor of American studies, professor of history, whose research interest includes the study of violence against women.

Jaclyn Friedman ’93, who is a performer and co-editor of “Yes Means Yes! Visions of Female Sexual Power and a World Without Rape.”

Connie J. Kirkland, director of sexual assault services at George Mason University in Virginia and a national expert on campus stalking.

Janet Peckinpaugh, a 30-year broadcast journalist with her own media marketing firm who has been a victim of stalking and domestic violence.

Laurie Perez, reporter, FOX CT will moderate the event.

“Violence  — stalking, intimate partner violence, sexual assault and hazing –among young people is a problem in the United States, and to that extent, we have to assume that it is a campus problem to some degree,” Potter says. ” In addition, according to the Department of Justice, women in particular are most likely to be the object of violence between the ages of 16 and 24; hence, you might even argue that we on college campuses are at the epicenter of something we could affect and intervene in.  What seems to me most relevant, however, is that administrators and faculty always want to be in the position of anticipating challenges proactively, rather than responding to incidents of violence on campus and assessing, after the fact, what we might have done to help someone who has already been harmed.”

The event is co-sponsored by the Hartford Courant and FOX CT, and presented in partnership with Wesleyan University. It is free and open to the public. Anyone interested in attending is encouraged to register by e-mail at corpaffairs@courant.com or by calling 860-241-3614.

Potter Writes about Partner Violence in Hartford Courant

Claire Potter, professor of history, professor of American studies, wrote an Op-ed titled “Intimate Partner Violence: A Scourge Hauled Out of the Shadows,” for the April 4 edition of The Hartford Courant.

Potter discusses the often unreported crime of intimate partner violence and how recognition of these incidents has at least increased over the last few decades. While awareness of these incidents as crimes has increased since the 1970s, when Potter was first exposed to it, the patterns and incidents themselves remain entrenched.

“Reflecting on this as an adult feminist, I think that we — several women and men — had no language to describe what we knew. The phrase ‘domestic violence’ was just emerging, even in policy circles,” she writes.

Potter will be a panelist April 27 at Wesleyan at a Key Issues Forum, “The Person You Think You Know: Signs and Solutions of Campus Violence.”

‘War’ Topic of Ongoing Humanities’ Lecture Series

Sally Bachner, assistant professor of English, spoke on “Rape Trauma, Combat Trauma, and the Making of PTSD: Feminist Fiction in the 1970s” Feb. 15 in the Russell House. Bachner's talk was part of the ongoing Center for the Humanities Spring Lecture Series on "War." (Photo by Stefan Weinberger '10)

Sally Bachner, assistant professor of English, spoke on “Rape Trauma, Combat Trauma, and the Making of PTSD: Feminist Fiction in the 1970s” Feb. 15 in the Russell House. Bachner's talk was part of the ongoing Center for the Humanities Spring Lecture Series on "War." (Photo by Stefan Weinberger '10)

In the 1970s, veterans, activists and psychiatrists were hard at work getting the disorder that came to be called post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) included in the upcoming edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders III. During the same period, feminists were building a successful anti-rape movement that crucially insisted that rape is a form of violence.

On Feb. 15, Sally Bachner, assistant professor of English, spoke on “Rape Trauma, Combat Trauma, and the Making of PTSD: Feminist Fiction in the 1970s” during the Center for the John E. Sawyer Spring Lecture Series on War.

The public is invited to all CHUM lectures. (Photo by Stefan Weinberger '10)

The public is invited to all CHUM lectures. (Photo by Stefan Weinberger '10)

Bachner proposed that while both of these groups sought to bring suffering – of combat veterans and rape victims, respectively – into speech, many feminist novelists of this period instead turn to the figure of the soldier to figure rape as unspeakable. PTSD functions in these texts as a technology for figuring what was initially conceived of as suppressed speech about violence against women as a putatively “unspeakable” trauma.

Bachner, who is currently completing a book on violence in contemporary American fiction titled, The Prestige of Violence: American Fiction, 1962-2002, is among a dozen guests speaking in CHUM’s ongoing lecture series. Past topics this spring include robots and war, the war between international law and politics, U.S. foreign policy with Iraq and Afghanistan and war and the nation. Most recently, Trevor Paglen, artist and