Tag Archive for Freeman Center

Ma ’17 Exhibits Painting Thesis at Freeman Gallery

Paintings by Jiaqi Maria Ma '17 are on exhibit in the Freeman Center for East Asian Studies Gallery. Ma created the paintings, titled (BEIJING | 北京) for her thesis at Wesleyan.

Paintings by Jiaqi Maria Ma ’17 are on exhibit at the Freeman Center for East Asian Studies Gallery. Ma, pictured at right, created the paintings for her Wesleyan thesis titled (BEIJING | 北京).

On Sept. 20, Ma presented an artists talk inside the gallery. (BEIJING | 北京) consists of a series of five paintings based on her experiences in Beijing. "I feel as though I made my memories real by building my own city through the process of painting," she said.

On Sept. 20, Ma presented an artist’s talk inside the gallery. (BEIJING | 北京) consists of a series of five paintings based on her experiences living in Beijing. “I feel as though I made my memories real by building my own city through the process of painting,” she said. Ma, a Freeman Asian Scholar, double majored in classical studies and studio art and minored in archaeology.

Schwarcz Delivers 40th Annual Mansfield Freeman Lecture

Vera Schwarcz, the Freeman Professor of History and East Asian Studies, professor of history, delivered the 40th Annual Mansfield Freeman Lecture on April 16. She spoke in Daniel Family Commons on “The Human Dot on Yellow Mountain: Re-thinking 45 Years of China Study.” (Photos by Dat Vu ’15.)

For more than four decades, Schwarcz has grappled with intellectual dilemmas surrounding a changing reality in China. She has written extensively about comparative history, trauma and memory, as well as the role of intellectuals in the pursuit of the truth.

For more than four decades, Schwarcz has grappled with intellectual dilemmas surrounding a changing reality in China. She has written extensively about comparative history, trauma and memory, as well as the role of intellectuals in the pursuit of the truth.

In her lecture, Schwarcz offered a retrospective gaze upon the turning points in Western understanding of China, and upon the impact of the Freeman Legacy in East Asian Studies at Wesleyan. She also examined the cultural context that shapes our shifting views of China today.

In her lecture, Schwarcz offered a retrospective gaze upon the turning points in Western understanding of China, and upon the impact of the Freeman Legacy in East Asian Studies at Wesleyan. She also examined the cultural context that shapes our shifting views of China today.

Since 1976, the Mansfield Freeman Lecture has featured an outstanding scholar or other luminary in the field of East Asian Studies.

Since 1976, the Mansfield Freeman Lecture has featured an outstanding scholar or other luminary in the field of East Asian Studies.

Freeman Gallery Features Exhibit on Human, Geographic Form

In the multi dimensional installation "Silent Faces/Angkor," artist Mary Heebner knits together imagery and writing to create an elemental, spiritual, and involving interpretation of the myths of the ancient Angkor temple complex that plays on the links she has found between human and geographic forms. The exhibit is on display at the Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies Gallery through May 25.

In the multi dimensional installation “Silent Faces/Angkor,” artist Mary Heebner knits together imagery and writing to create an elemental, spiritual, and involving interpretation of the myths of the ancient Angkor temple complex that plays on the links she has found between human and geographic forms. The exhibit is on display at the Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies Gallery through May 25.

Yamashita ’71, Bestor, Speak on Tohoku Earthquake, Disaster

Michael Yamashita '71, photographer for the National Geographic Magazine, spoke during the Freeman East Asian Studies Lecture Series March 8. The topic was "Tohoku Earthquake/Tsunami & Disaster, Food, and Fishing: The Aftermath of March 11." After graduating from Wesleyan with a degree in East Asian studies, he spent seven years in Asia, which became his photographic area of specialty. Upon returning to the U.S., Yamashita began shooting for the National Geographic as well as other American and international magazines and clients. His work has taken him to six continents.

Ted Bestor, the Reischauer Institute Professor of Social Anthropology and Japanese Studies at Harvard University is a specialist on contemporary Japanese society and culture, focusing much of his research on Tokyo. His current research focuses on the aftermath of the March 11 Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster, particularly their impact on national food supply and perceptions of food safety. (Photos by Bill Tyner '13)

The next FEAS lecture is on “Murakami Ryz and the Madonna Horror Complex,” at 4:30 p.m. March 29. View all upcoming FEAS lectures online here.

Shinohara Speaks about Contemporary Japanese Prints

In this video, Artist-in-Residence Keiji Shinohara introduces “A Late Christmas Gift: Contemporary Prints from Japan” at the Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies on Feb. 1. The 46 prints in this exhibition represent a wide range of contemporary Japanese printmakers, from established artists to graduate students and includes works in all print media. Shinohara is an internationally known woodblock printer who has been at Wesleyan for almost 20 years.

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Photographer, Embroiderers Collaborate for “Metamorphosis” Exhibition

Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies Curator Patrick Dowdey gives Hartford Courant reporter Susan Dunne an introduction to an embroidery titled "Graceful Branch Movement." The work is featured in the center's exhibition, "Metamorphosis: the Collaboration Between Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum and the Suzhou Embroiderers" through Dec. 9. Seo-in "Claire" Choi '13 admires the embroidery "Graceful Branch Movement" as it is unpacked in preparation for the exhibition. The piece is the tallest two-sided embroidery panel ever created. "Graceful Branch" is derived from Robert Glenn Ketchum's recent digital image, "TURN, TURN, TURN" that also will be displayed as a photographic print.

East Asian Studies Majors Teach Local Students through Hands-on Cultural Activities


Erica Chon ’13 teaches a group of students and teachers from the Lorraine Foster Day School how to create a sushi roll during the Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies Outreach Program March 4. The Outreach Program is designed to reach local students by providing a range of hands-on cultural activities that introduce them to various aspects of East Asian cultures. More than 300 students in grades K-12 participate in the program every year.


Freeman Scholars Join Wesleyan from 11 Countries

The Wesleyan Freeman Asian Scholars Program enables qualified young men and women from each of 11 countries or regions – The People’s Republic of China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam to come to Wesleyan on full tuition scholarships.

This program is made possible by Wesleyan University and the Freeman Foundation, which aims to improve understanding and to strengthen ties between the United States and the countries of the Pacific Rim. Entry into the Wesleyan Freeman Asian Scholars Program is highly competitive: only one student will be selected annually from each country.

Below are photos of the 2010-11 Freeman Scholars at Wesleyan on Oct. 8. This is the 16th class of scholars. (Photos by Bill Burkhart)

The Class of 2011.

Givner ’10 to Experience Chinese Culture First Hand

Matthew Givner ’10

On Sept. 1, Matthew Givner ’10 became one of 19 Princeton-in-Asia fellows from around the world who is teaching English in a Chinese province.

Givner moved to Dalain, a city of 6.5 million people located 288 miles east of Beijing.  There, he is teaching English, writing, reading and speaking to students at Dalian University of Technology with three other fellows. He teaches 14 class hours per week.

Givner learned of the program through a family friend and Wesleyan’s Career Resource Center. He attended two information sessions on the program at the Career Resource Center and decided to apply.  

Nakamura Speaks on Nativist Movement Scholar

Miri Nakamura, assistant professor of Asian languages and literatures, spoke on "The Supernatural Writings of Ueda Akinari," Feb. 5 in the Freeman Center for Easy Asian Studies. Ueda Akinari (1734-1809) was a writer, poet, a medical doctor, and a scholar of the nativist movement in Edo period Japan.

Miri Nakamura, assistant professor of Asian languages and literatures, spoke on "The Supernatural Writings of Ueda Akinari," Feb. 5 in the Freeman Center for Easy Asian Studies. Ueda Akinari (1734-1809) was a writer, poet, a medical doctor, and a scholar of the nativist movement in Edo period Japan.

Nakamura explained how Akinari’s use of the supernatural is tied to his philosophy on nativism—a proto-nationalist movement that aimed to seek a “Japan” untainted by foreign (mainly Chinese) influences. Akinari's most famous works include Tales of Moonlight and Rain (1776) and Tales of the Spring Rain (1806).

Nakamura explained how Akinari’s use of the supernatural is tied to his philosophy on nativism—a proto-nationalist movement that aimed to seek a “Japan” untainted by foreign (mainly Chinese) influences. Akinari's most famous works include Tales of Moonlight and Rain (1776) and Tales of the Spring Rain (1806).

Vera Schwarcz, the Mansfield Freeman Professor of East Asian Studies, director of the Freeman Center, chair of the East Asian Studies Program and professor of history, listens to Nakamura's talk. (Photos by Stefan Weinberger '10)

Vera Schwarcz, the Mansfield Freeman Professor of East Asian Studies, director of the Freeman Center, chair of the East Asian Studies Program and professor of history, listens to Nakamura's talk. (Photos by Stefan Weinberger '10)