Tag Archive for Hingorani

Hingorani Receives State Award for Tobacco-Related Illness Research

At left, State Senator Joseph Crisco awarded Manju Hingorani, associate professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, with a Department of Public Health grant to fund her research titled "Role of DNA Mismatch Repair in Tobacco Smoke-Mediated Carcinogenesis.”

A Connecticut Department of Public Health (DPH) award will fund a biomedical research project on tobacco-related illnesses.

On Oct. 26, Senator Joseph Crisco (D-Woodbridge) presented Manju Hingorani, associate professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, with one of the eight awards, supported by the Connecticut DPH Biomedical Trust Fund. Hingorani received a $165,083 grant to promote understanding of the mechanisms whereby DNA mismatch repair suppresses carcinogenesis and development of refractory cancers.

“While we have made considerable progress in the area of tobacco use prevention, tobacco-related illnesses continue to be the leading causes of disability and death,” said Senator Crisco, sponsor of legislation in 2005 creating the Biomedical Trust Fund in a state press release. “This research is helping to shine new light on how tobacco use contributes to chronic diseases, and moves us forward in the effort to save lives of those stricken with cancer, heart disease, and other smoking-related diseases, which are leading causes of death in Connecticut.”

Hingorani’s study was selected from 17 highly-competitive applications. This is the first time Wesleyan has received a grant from the Biomedical Research Trust Fund.

The grant will fund a post-doc and research associate’s projects through September 2012.

The funding “is a positive indication that Connecticut is moving forward with a strong commitment to carrying out the goals of the biomedical research bill, and that is to use a portion of the tobacco settlement funding to provide funding for research efforts to help fight cancer, heart disease, and other diseases that may be linked to smoking,” Senator Crisco said in the press release.

According to state health officials, tobacco is the single most preventable cause of mortality and morbidity in our society. In Connecticut, tobacco use is associated with over 5,000 deaths per year. These deaths are primarily caused by cancer, heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Tobacco also causes secondary adverse health effects to nonsmokers exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke is a significant cause of morbidity in children that manifests itself in diseases such as asthma, bronchitis and pneumonia.

Hingorani Awarded Grants from State, NIH, NSF

Manju Hingorani

Manju Hingorani, associate professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, received a $165,083 grant from the Connecticut Department of Health for her study titled “Role of DNA Mismatch Repair in Tobacco Smoke-Mediated Carcinogenesis.” The grant will fund a post-doc and research associate’s projects through September 2012.

Also, Hingorani, received a $497,532 grant from the National Institutes of Health for her study titled “PCNA Clamp Mechanisms in DNA Replication and Repair.” The grant will fund graduate and undergraduate students’ research projects through June 2013. The project is supported by Award number R15GM094047 from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences.

Also, Hingorani received a $765,141 grant from the National Science Foundation for her study titled “Kinetic Mechanisms of DNA Mismatch Repair Proteins.” The grant will fund a post-doc and graduate and undergraduate students’ research projects through September 2014. The project is supported by Award number MCB-1022203 from the Division of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences.

Hingorani, Royer Published in National Academy of Sciences

Manju Hingorani, associate professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, is the author of “S. cerevisiae Msh2-Msh6 DNA binding kinetics reveal a mechanism of targeting sites for DNA mismatch repair,” published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ” Early Edition,” December 2009.

Dana Royer, assistant professor of earth and environmental sciences, is the author of “Fossil soils constrain ancient climate sensitivity,” published in the same journal.

Hughes Summer Research Program Begins with a Bash

Michael Weir, director of the Hughes Program in the Life Sciences, professor of biology, speaks to students at the 21st Hughes Summer Research Program pizza party May 27.

Michael Weir, director of the Hughes Program in the Life Sciences, professor of biology, speaks to students at a pizza party that launched the the 21st Hughes Summer Research Program May 27. Weir and Laurel Appel, director of the McNair Program, explained various seminars and workshops available to complement the students' summer-long research efforts.

The gathering allowed the students to meet and mingle with several faculty members including, at left, Ishita Mukerji, professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, and Manju Hingorani, associate professor of molecular biology and biochemistry.

The gathering allowed the students to meet and mingle with several faculty members including, at left, Ishita Mukerji, professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, and Manju Hingorani, associate professor of molecular biology and biochemistry.

Pizza party attendees included 58 Hughes Fellows, eight McNair Fellows, nine Mellon Fellows, six SCIC Fellows, 11 students supported by other funds, and volunteers who started their 10 week summer research projects.

Pizza party attendees included 58 Hughes Fellows, eight McNair Fellows, nine Mellon Fellows, six SCIC Fellows, 11 students supported by other funds, and volunteers who started their 10 week summer research projects.

Bill Nelligan, director of environmental halth, safety and sustainability, stands by empty pizza boxes from the party. Nelligan taught the fellows about safety issues. (Photos by Laurel Appel)

Bill Nelligan, director of environmental health, safety and sustainability, stands by empty pizza boxes from the party. Nelligan taught the fellows about safety issues in and around the labs. (Photos by Laurel Appel)

Hingorani, Biro ’09 Co-Author Article on Metal Toxin

Manju Hingorani, associate professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, is the co-author of “Mechanism of Cadmium-mediated Inhibition of Msh2-Msh6 Function in DNA Mismatch Repair,” published in Biochemistry, March 25, 2009. Three undergraduates from three countries worked on the project in the Hingorani Lab at Wesleyan. They include Francis Noah Biro ’09; Markus Wieland, an exchange student from University of Konstanz; and Karan Hingorani, Manju Hingorani’s nephew from St. Xaviers College in Mumbai who did volunteer work in the lab. The project focused on how the heavy metal toxin Cadmium (found in cigarette smoke, industrial pollution, batteries, etc.) causes DNA damage and blocks DNA repair, which promotes development of cancer.

Hingorani also co-authored the article “Mechanism of ATP-Driven PCNA Clamp Loading by S. cerevisiae RFC,” published in the Journal of Molecular Biology, March 13, 2009.