Tag Archive for mellon fellows

Mellon Mays Fellow Haymon ’16 is Double Majoring in German Studies, Theater

Miranda Haymon '16 will be directing her own adaptation of Slaughterhouse-Five in the Center for the Arts Theater. (Photo by Laurie Kenney)

Next year, Miranda Haymon ’16 will be directing her own adaptation of Slaughterhouse-Five in the Center for the Arts Theater. As a Mellon Mays Fellow, Haymon will explore how (or if) artistic works, movements and theories reflect artists’ political positions. “Through this project I hope to put myself in a better position to understand the definition of political theater in the context of post World War II Germany and beyond.” (Photo by Laurie Kenney)

In this News @ Wesleyan story, we speak with Miranda Haymon from the Class of 2016. #THISISWHY

Q: Miranda, what are you majoring in and why?

A: I am a German studies and theater double major but when I started at Wesleyan, I thought I was going to create my own linguistics major under the University Major option. I remember very clearly the Wesleyan Admissions Dean telling me I could take four languages for all four years if I wanted to — I was instantly sold. Instead of doing that, I ended up taking a few theater classes, a German language class and a First Year Seminar cross-listed in German Studies.

Mellon Fellows Explore Significance of Race, Social Class in South Africa

CaVar Reid '11, second from left, speaks to his peers during Mellon South African Summer Program, held Jan. 4-10 in Cape Town, South Africa.

CaVar Reid '11, second from left, speaks to his peers during Mellon South African Summer Program, held Jan. 4-10 in Cape Town, South Africa.

In 1966, the apartheid government controlling South Africa began forcing more than 60,000 residents of color from their Cape Town homes in attempt to destroy a multi-racial neighborhood called District Six.

On Jan. 8, 2010, Taylor Cain ’11 and CaVar Reid ’11 toured this area, once a flourishing and lively community of freed slaves and immigrants. The township exploration was just one way Cain and Reid gained an understanding of the South African socio-economic, racial, cultural, historical and environmental landscape while interacting with students from academic institutions in the United States and South Africa.

“Knowing the history involved in District Six made going through it a sombering  experience because as we saw all the newer building but we always had in the back of our minds, the thousands of people who were physically forced out of these homes and schools,” Reid recalls. “Some areas have been redeveloped a little but … There is actually big plot of land with a lot of rubble from some of the destroyed homes.”

As Wesleyan Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellows, Cain and Reid participated in the Mellon South African Program, held Jan. 3-10 in Cape Town.

Mellon Fellows Study Imprisoned Fathers, Haitian Diaspora, Jamaica’s Post-Independence Identity

CaVar Reid '11, a Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow, presents his research proposal July 30 in Fisk Hall. Reid's project is titled "Ain't No Fathers in the Hood: An Ethnography of Incarcerated Black Fatherhood."

CaVar Reid '11, a Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow, presents his research proposal July 30 in Fisk Hall. Reid's project is titled "Ain't No Fathers in the Hood: An Ethnography of Incarcerated Black Fatherhood."

According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, one out of every three black men between the ages 20 and 29 is in prison, on probation or on parole. Of these men, 94 percent are fathers.

English and African American Studies major CaVar Reid ’11 is curious to discover how prison affects a man’s ability to be a father.

“I want to ask them, ‘What were your expectations about your relationships with your children when you were incarcerated? How do you think your incarceration has affected your children? How did you stay involved with your children?'” Reid says.

As a 2009-11 Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow, Reid will have the opportunity to interview incarcerated and former prisoners at the Osborne Association for an independent research project titled “Ain’t No Fathers in the Hood: An Ethnography of Incarcerated Black Fatherhood.” His study will include the interviews, and cite historians, social workers and anthropologists on prison fatherhood.

“With my data I am trying to tell the story of a group of black men who, I would suggest,