Swinehart Explains How Indigenous People Took Part in British Service

Kirk Swinehart, assistant professor of history, led a talk titled "Mourning War: A Story of Love and Greed in British America," Dec. 7 in Russell House.

Kirk Swinehart, assistant professor of history, led a talk titled "Mourning War: A Story of Love and Greed in British America," Dec. 7 in Russell House.

Swinehart discussed the biracial dynasty of Sir William Johnson, an Irish immigrant and adopted Mohawk who emerged as one of the 18th century's most colorful and divisive political figures. Johnson served as the superintendent of Indian affairs for the northern colonies.

Swinehart discussed the biracial dynasty of Sir William Johnson, an Irish immigrant and adopted Mohawk who emerged as one of the 18th century's most colorful and divisive political figures. Johnson served as the superintendent of Indian affairs for the northern colonies.

Students listen to Swinehart's presentation.

Students listen to Swinehart's presentation.

In his lecture, Swinehart suggested how the remarkable story of Johnson's ill-fated clan contains a larger story about elusive forces that would bring indigenous peoples into British service well into the 20th century.

In his lecture, Swinehart suggested how the remarkable story of Johnson's ill-fated clan contains a larger story about elusive forces that would bring indigenous peoples into British service well into the 20th century. (Photos by Stefan Weinberger '10)